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Noobie need help!!! Trying to CD/Radio quality in hip-hop mixes

Discussion in 'Recording' started by LP_TheBoss, Dec 24, 2010.

  1. LP_TheBoss

    LP_TheBoss Active Member

    So i have all this equipment but i feel like im not using its full potential.
    i have it set-up like this:

    Rode NT1-A ---> Presonus TubePRE ----> DBX 266XL ----> Mbox 2 ----> ProTools 8/ Windows Vista

    Basically I'm looking for that professional sound that are CD/ Radio quality. I feel like the tracks i have mixed have too much body or something isn't sounding like it had had been professionally done. I only 18 and im just trying to learn and develop my skills as an audio engineer. On this site are some examples of songs i have mixed:
    A Case of the Mondays | K'leb

    Any suggestions on to how make the vocals sound like at least like this:
    Sickkkk! | Nike Nando

    Hopefully someone knows what im talking about and hears the difference between the vocals i mixed and the vocals from the other artist.
    All answers are appreciated!!!!
    :biggrin:
     
  2. TheJackAttack

    TheJackAttack Distinguished Member

    Your first step would be to dump the compressor on the recording path. If you need to compress, use a good plugin. Once you have enough experience to know when and how much compression you might want on a specific instrument/voice you might consider tracking with the compressor at that point.

    Now you need to start playing with stereo versus mono on the individual tracks. Some things work best in mono and panned. Some work best double tracked and interleaved as "stereo." Some things work best actually tracked in stereo. Basically there is too much variation to give a straight line checklist.

    You need to click the book link at the top navigation bar and go to your local library or purchase from Amazon a couple of books. The first EVERY sound guy should have, the Gary Davis Sound Reinforcement Handbook. Another book to maybe check out specifically for mixing is the Art of Mixing or Live Sound Mixing. Other than that, it is all about experimenting.
     
  3. LP_TheBoss

    LP_TheBoss Active Member

    Exactly what type of compressor plug-in do you suggest me looking into?
    I want to get a WAVES bundle but that's too much for me and also is that the best software for the quality im trying to get?
    Thank You for the response. I thought nobody would even pay attention to my post.
    SMFH.
    Thank You.
    Im also looking into the iZotope Ozone Plug-in.
    Is it worth it?
     
  4. TheJackAttack

    TheJackAttack Distinguished Member

    iZotope makes some effective plugins. A compressor, whether plug or physical, is a useful yet dangerous tool. It can smooth or crush depending on how it's used. A good place to get your feet wet on plugins would be the Floorfish plugs and the GVST plugs which I find to be effective. I do use iZotope plugs, specifically the RX Advanced and sometimes the multiband compressor, but truly the WAVES and UAD etc are the high end for a reason.
     
  5. LP_TheBoss

    LP_TheBoss Active Member

    Why would you use the RX Advanced?
    That's for audio restoration and if you have XLR mic you wouldn't need that, correct?
    And I know that experimenting with the compression is the only way to get that right sound that your comfortable with but is there any other processes that you would know of that would get that professional CD/ Radio quality I'm looking for?
     
  6. TheJackAttack

    TheJackAttack Distinguished Member

    You asked about a company, Izotope. I answered that the primary Izotope plug I used/have experience with was the RX and occasionally a multiband compressor. Implied but not overtly stated is that Ozone-a mastering suite of plugins-is not a place to start as it is too easy to ruin the audio.

    What I recommended is you start with free plugs from two companies-GVST and the Fish Fillets.

    (Dead Link Removed)
    GVST
     

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