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Ok, I'll start - What is Nuendo?

Discussion in 'Nuendo' started by Rick Greenly, Feb 15, 2001.

  1. Rick Greenly

    Rick Greenly Guest

    For those unfamiliar with the program, here's a brief description -

    Nuendo is a software program for Windows or Mac, designed to be a central environment that handles the usual recording operations of tracking, editing, mixing, etc. for any type of audio production.

    Nuendo is a native, or host-based recording application. That means it uses a computer's processing power to determine it's capabilities. Questions like "How many tracks does it have" are therefore answered by what it is installed in, and how that installation is configured. The advertised maximum track count is 200, YMWV. Steinberg offers dedicated Nuendo hardware for getting audio in and out of your computer, etc. but you can choose different hardware to suit your needs from many different suppliers. There are ups and downs to this approach, as we shall see in future threads.

    I suppose a short list of major features would be appropriate, since this topic title assumes little or no familiarity with the product, so here goes...

    - Unlimited undo/redo with history list
    - 64 Group channels
    - 32bit Floating Point 96k file support
    - VST Instrument support
    - Flexible automated surround sound mixing
    - Editable and auto crossfades
    - sync to MTC, Midi clock, 9pin
    - Cubase song file import
    - remote hardware control support
    - cue and track sheet printing
    - realtime VST plugin support

    and on and on...

    It's Steinberg's flagship audio production program, and it has a list price of $1,299. Current version is 1.5 for Windows, 1.01 for Mac, although 1.5 will ship soon for Mac as well.


    I hope that didn't sound too much like a brochure,

    Rick
     
  2. audiokid

    audiokid Staff

    Alright! can we call you a moderator? ;)
     
  3. SonOfSmawg

    SonOfSmawg Well-Known Member

    Thanks for the good start, Rick. I didn't know that Nuendo was available for Mac yet!
    Perhaps you could enlighten us to some typical turnkey systems that are configured to run Nuendo? I'm aware of the fact that Nuendo works well with dual-processor PCs, so does it work well with the dual-processor Macs? Any news on how it is working on the Mac 733?
     
  4. Rick Greenly

    Rick Greenly Guest

    Originally posted by audiokid:
    Alright! can we call you a moderator? ;)

    audiokid,

    Thanks for the vote of confidence. I am trying to get a moderator for this forum that works directly for Steinberg. Until then, I'll do the best I can to help anybody here. You want me to wear the badge for now? That's cool, but remember, I'm a sales guy, not a product specialist. Get ready to bump me when we get a replacement, ok?

    Nuendo is relatively new, and DEEP! I am learning about the details of the program right along with everybody else, but I don't sit down every day and use it in a professional environment. There are people that do, obviously, and I am learning from them about how Nuendo operates in the real world. Anybody can download the manual from Nuendo.com, but that will only get you so far.

    The best thing we can do here, IMO, is try to gain understanding of Nuendo's true strengths and weaknesses, not get sucked into the rumor mill and sniping that has plagued some other forums, and resist the temptation to bash anybody's products.

    That's a tall order, because people like to justify their purchases, and sometimes let their egos get the best of them. This isn't the Recording App Olympics.

    Comparisons are welcomed, encouraged, and extremely useful and informative if handled in a way that doesn't degenerate into the school yard "My app can beat up your app" kind of posts that don't really help anyone. Every program is somebody's fav. Cool. How does Nuendo compare? Let's find out!

    Cheers,

    Rick
     
  5. gtrmac

    gtrmac Guest

    I work for a Pro audio dealer/ studio builder in Japan that deals mostly with TV studios. I have been building systems for Nuendo since we have recently started selling it. I am using the following PC hardware with very good results:
    -Pentium III 1GHz Coppermine
    -Asus CUSL-2C Motherboard
    -512 MB Crucial Technologies PC133 SDRAM
    -IBM 75GXP 15GB ATA-100 7200RPM System Drive
    -Adaptec 19160 SCSI card
    -IBM 36 GB 10k RPM Ultra160 SCSI Audio Drive
    -Matrox G-450 Dual Head Graphics Card
    -Asus CD S-500 CD-ROM Drive
    -Teac CDW 512E CDRW (Plextor 12/10/32)
    -Nuendo 9652 Audio Card
    -Mitsui Floppy Disk Drive
    -Ultra160 SCSI Removable case
    -Boomrack Rackmount chassis

    -Win2000
    -Nuendo
    -WaveLab

    I have also been using a dual CPU system for demonstration. I'm not sold on the advantages of this yet though. There isn't a reasonably priced motherboard for a dual system which doesn't have some drawbacks. If someone "must" have two PIII's I might sell one though.
     
  6. Fredrik

    Fredrik Guest

    Hi!
    Why don't you think it's an advantage to have a dual processor machine with Nuendo? Which are the drawbacks, besides the price?
    Isn't the program properly designed for dual processing?

    Regards,
    Fredrik Lidin
     
  7. michael b

    michael b Guest

    'nuendo hardware' seems to include rebadged RME soundcard & converters. can't imagine a better endorsement for RME hardware.
     
  8. gtrmac

    gtrmac Guest

    In reply to the "drawbacks of two CPU system" question the problem is the availability of a suitable motherboard. The VIA chipset based motherboards like the MSI 694D and Abit VP-6 are burdened with the hardware compatability issues of the VIA chipset. The other solutions like the Intel OR840 and the Supermicro i840 based motherboards are very expensive, use RAMBUS memory, and are cluttered with onboard stuff that is not needed. The latter includes SCSI adaptor chips, graphics and audio. There just doesn't seem to be an ideal solution. The software runs quite well with a dual CPU system. If you are willing to spring for the i840 motherboard you will have a great system. I have a system running very well on an MSI 694D Pro by the way but it was a LOT of trouble to get all the drivers up to date.
     
  9. Rick Greenly

    Rick Greenly Guest

    Originally posted by michael b:
    'nuendo hardware' seems to include rebadged RME soundcard & converters. can't imagine a better endorsement for RME hardware.

    That's right. RME is Nuendo's OEM hardware supplier. Good sound quality, low latency, etc.

    Many Nuendo customers prefer to have their software and hardware ship from the same supplier, so Steinberg came up with this as a solution. The Studio System One addresses this quite nicely, being a package deal on the most popular Nuendo items for a substantial savings.

    Rick
     

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