Ordering units in a compressor chain

Discussion in 'Mastering' started by audiovisceral, Mar 6, 2006.

  1. Mastering dogma states, I understand, that multiple compressors with smaller amounts of attenuation will provide a more natural result than fewer compressors with a higher attenuation.

    In ordering compressor units, then, what set of principles do you apply?

    Is it generally best to apply high attack/release compression first to take care of transients, and then progress to more relaxed low attack/release compression?

    Or might one start with the low attack/release compression and move up to the high attack/release, ending with the highest attack/release of all (ie. the limiting)?
     
  2. pingu

    pingu Guest

    So whats the reason behind you wanting these levels?
     
  3. TrilliumSound

    TrilliumSound Active Member

    Here again, no rules.Well, actually, yes, there is a rule: How does it sounds?

    How does it sounds when you try both? Which one sounds better to your ears and taste? Why don't you want to try it out? Trying this out could take less time than posting and waiting for a formula online imo.

    Best.
     
  4. RemyRAD

    RemyRAD Well-Known Member

    Well if you look at it from a broadcast point of view, generally you would compress first with slower attack and release times to "pump up the volume". Then you would at the peak limiter with a fast attack and release time to stay within legal limits. Conversely for a different kind of effect in recording, you could reverse that which would give you tighter control with some overall automatic gain control to even things out a bit? You only to this stuff for the sound which is dictated by your perceptions. You can control the horizontal. You can control the vertical. You can adjust the focus for a soft blur or sharpen it to crystal clarity. You are now entering THE OUTER LIMITS!

    You're traveling through another dimension
    Ms. Remy Ann David
     

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