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Overhead Drum Micing... Condensor Or Dynamic

Discussion in 'Room & Overhead' started by scotter, Apr 16, 2006.

  1. scotter

    scotter Guest

    I play drums in a cover band that gigs often. Small to medium clubs and outdoor functions as well. I woulld like to overhead vs close mic. I have a Shure Beta 52 for the kick and Shure SM57 for snare.

    I am confused. Do I need Dynamic or Condensor mics for overheads. I want to capture the the toms as well as the cymbals. The drums are DW and all cymbals are Sabian AA or better. Five pc kit 2 crash/1 ride/1 china crash/2 splash and of course hats.

    Any comments would be greatly appreciated. Thank You.....Scott
     
  2. RemyRAD

    RemyRAD Well-Known Member

    Dear Scott, you are already on the right track! (Pun intended)

    You already have the 2 most important microphones and you should put those on the snare drum and bass drum respectively, close in. The 2 overhead Mike's typically are condenser type but don't have to be. 2 overhead SM57 microphones will also yield quality results! They are simply great microphones on percussion handsdown. (Pun intended) I would not rack them up too high (pun intended) but rather keeping them slightly lower in order to catch more lower tone on the toms. Keep them within 2 feet above or in front of the toms. I have frequently made excellent recordings as I have described above when wind or off axis noise was more of a factor. The dynamics (pun intended) are dynamically better in that response (pun intended).

    Making recordings for "Pun & Profit"
    Ms. Remy Ann David
     
  3. moonbaby

    moonbaby Mmmmmm Well-Known Member

    I do a lot of live drumkit mic'ing throughout the year, and love the challenges that a live drummer in a big band present me. I have found a relatively new dynamic mic to replace the ubiquitous SM81 as OH mics.
    This is the Audix i5 dynamic. It is very tough and durable, has great low end to pick up the toms, and the top end is very "condenser-like". What I mean by this is that it is extended but not harsh-very good for the cymbals. They also work great on the Latin Percussion type of instruments that I regularly run across. And they're a mere $100 a pop, making them a great alternative to the 57.
     
  4. scotter

    scotter Guest

    Remy/Moonbaby...............guys thank you very much. This band is a three pc. Guitar/Bass/Drums. It is a challenge and the audio is critical. I will post back on what I find. Next gig is outdoor festival style in two weeks. I'll set up as you guys recommend and let you know how it worked. Thanks,again.........Scott
     
  5. scotter

    scotter Guest

    We just did two outdoor gigs. We set up two Audix I5 overheads, a Shure Beta 52 on the kick and a Shure 57 on the snare. The sound was awesome and required only four channels on the board. We are completely satisfied. Thanks for the input. By the way, I am completely blown away by the I5...............Thanks,again........Scott
     
  6. moonbaby

    moonbaby Mmmmmm Well-Known Member

    Glad to hear that you liked the i5!! I think it is a great mic that, once people who are sworn 57 users try it, will get a lot more use.
     

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