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Polished Sounding Tambourines

Discussion in 'Pro Audio Equipment' started by Kricun, Nov 3, 2003.

  1. Kricun

    Kricun Guest

    How do you get those really perfect polished sounding tambourines that you hear on records today? You know the ones I'm talking about. Anybody care to share your techniques? Samples or live?
  2. white swan

    white swan Guest

    I use Liquid Pledge.

    Sorry, just joking.

    The key to great sounding tambourines, in my limited experience, is:

    1) Don't get too close to the mic.

    2) Use the best most accurate small diaphragm condenser you can find. Preferably omni.

    3) Don't get too close to the mic.

    Obviously, a good sounding instrument and a player who really knows how to play it is a big part of it too. Oh yeah, did I mention don't get too close to the mic? :D
  3. Ethan Winer

    Ethan Winer Active Member

    Mar 19, 2001
    New Milford, CT USA
    Home Page:

    White swan nailed it - twice. :D

    Besides wanting to be at least three feet back from the mike, you'll get the most convincing sound if the floor is reflective. Too many home studios have a dead room with carpet, and that always sounds lifeless and lackluster. If you don't have an area with a bare floor, put the player near a bare wall or corner. You really need some nearby reflection to have the recording sound like the player is right there in the room with you. Note that this works with all acoustic instruments, not just tambourines.

  4. denial

    denial Guest

    I'm not a big fan of Brass tambourines as they sound too much like Jingle Bells. Nickel is the way to go but YMMV.
  5. Mundox

    Mundox Guest

    Put the player next to the glass. Record the direct signal as well as the reflection off the glass.(one mic)

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