Practical Mixing Training

Discussion in 'Mixing & Editing' started by kaushpaul, Jul 19, 2003.

  1. kaushpaul

    kaushpaul Guest

    Does anyone know of any school or institute in the Bay Area (preferably San Francisco) where I can take a course in mixing?

    I've found a few schools that offer online courses but I'm looking for a more hands-on approach to learning. I've read a few books by George Petersen and Jeff Strong but need practical training now as opposed to theoretical.
     
  2. RandomGuest

    RandomGuest Guest

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2001
    no school....

    simply get your foot in a facility in which you can work your way up from and internship to an assistant.

    IMHO you cant really teach someone how to mix other than some basic fundamentals from which you could get out of a book. Nothing beats watching a seasoned engineer doing it.

    Theres no shortcuts in this business....just get out and do it... the sooner you start the faster you can get to where you want to be.
     
  3. Guitarman

    Guitarman Guest

    Hey Kaushik,

    It would seem by reading your posts that you have a very good understanding of dynamics, processing etc.

    The need for a school to learn how to mix I think is null. One thing you have to remember is that when you mix not everything has to be there a hundred percent. Am not just talking about volumes. I am talking about frequencies also.

    Alot of guys don't undertsand that just because somethings sound great "solo'ed up" but when put them in the mix it gets muddied. This is because frequencies are clashing between things and the like.

    I usually start a mix with the kick, bass, and vocal. Then I bring the others into it slowly. Once you get the idea how certain instruments share a frequency base very similar with others you will learn that it doesn't take more than a 2 or 3 db change to a particular frequency(s) to get things correct.

    Not knowing your setup or if you even have a setup, it is hard to say where you should begin. But I hope this little but helps. And remember your mix space is tremendously important to have some kind of acoustical control. Or at least an understanding of what your room is doing to your mixes.

    Best wishes,

    JD( o}===;;;
     
  4. MisterBlue

    MisterBlue Guest

    Kaushik,

    I just did some work on my latest production with a very nice lady that runs a studio in Belmont, CA. She is a 5-time grammy nominee with a couple of gold albums under the belt and she told me that she is thinking about giving some "Mixing Master Classes".

    You might want to contact her and get on the mailing list. Here is where you can find some info:
    http://otrstudios.com/studinfo.html

    Other than these kind of events you simply have to "do it". Either on your own or by starting as an intern at another facility, as was mentioned by others.

    MisterBlue.
     
  5. Opus2000

    Opus2000 Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2001
    Spend an afternoon with Bob Clearmountain! :D
     
  6. paul lani

    paul lani Guest

    forget the schools for this simple rule that i really
    believe IS true:
    those who can , do
    those who can't , teach.
    most of the radical techniques that are used by the
    hired gun mixers would never be in a book because
    it violates proper engineering rules and laws.
    just listen carefully to the mixes that float your boat
    and a/b and soon you will be in the zone.
    s
     
  7. Treena Foster

    Treena Foster Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2003
    Mr. Blue are you talking about Cookie, I worked with her myself in the 80's that women rocks!

    :h: Treena
     
  8. MisterBlue

    MisterBlue Guest

    Treena,

    you are absolutely right! Cookie Marenco is the person I am talking about. She is mastering my latest project. We have made it through the first rev. and a fine job she did!

    And indeed, she rocks and is just a pleasure to work with :D .

    MisterBlue.
     
  9. Treena Foster

    Treena Foster Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2003
    MisterBlue, is Amy still booking the studio for Cookie? Cookie introduced me to the late great Leo Kulka, he taught me how to cut a groove into vinyl, a lost art for sure!

    Kaushik, you would do very well for yourself, if you can get into Cookies one on one sessions. Hands on is the best way to learn what to do and what not to do.


    Treena :h:
     
  10. kaushpaul

    kaushpaul Guest

    Thanks for the insightful feedback everyone...saved me a bundle on an online course on mixing...

    I'll look around for a studio near my home and try and see if I can intern there.

    And will definitely try and spend some time with Cookie, if its possible.
     

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