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Question about track list sequencing.....

Discussion in 'Recording' started by Brenguy, Jul 31, 2009.

  1. Brenguy

    Brenguy Guest

    I'm recording a demo through Adobe Audition 3.0. There is one song that I have feedback in at the end. I want to know how I can blend in the next song on the track list so the feedback from the first song is heard as a transition instead of a silent pause in between tracks. What software do I need and how do I do it?


    -Thanks for any help
     
  2. jg49

    jg49 Well-Known Member

    Paste it together as one song
     
  3. TheJackAttack

    TheJackAttack Distinguished Member

    Are you wanting to eliminate the space between tracks or are you trying to cross fade the tracks?

    If you want to cross fade the tracks then you do need to combine the files into a single track and create an Index point (f8 while playing).

    When you burn the CD you can change the options regarding space between tracks. The first track usually has an empty 2 seconds.
     
  4. Brenguy

    Brenguy Guest

    Thanks... I do want to cross fade tracks but does that mean I have to combine two projects into one? Thats very cpu intensive because of the eq's and effects on both songs...... Is there a way to combine them after mixing and mastering?
     
  5. cfaalm

    cfaalm Active Member

    Just mix the songs like you intended and have the first song end with the feedback for the time you see fit.

    Then reimport those mixes into another project, place the second song where the feedback from the first song starts and mix them like two separate stereo tracks. Now they will become one stereo wave file. This step will overcome your CPU issues.

    When in Nero CD burner you can later insert the marker where the next track begins.

    If you have an app like Sony's CD architect you can just mix the songs and place them in there, no need to do a separate mix. I haven't looked that deep into Nero, but I think it can't do it like CD Architect can.

    Make sure none of your steps is in lossy formats.
     
  6. hueseph

    hueseph Well-Known Member

    I can't imagine why you would want to do this at any other time other than during "mastering". Definitely after the mix is done.

    Edit: Audition should come with a version of CD Architect.
     
  7. Brenguy

    Brenguy Guest

    So when I mix it down should I keep it 32 bit float... or down to 16 and then just open that new project up at 16 and import the two songs? I mix down to lossless wave files.
     
  8. TheJackAttack

    TheJackAttack Distinguished Member

    Audition has the ability to put songs in whatever order you want. However, if you have already broken your session and saved the tracks individually you won't be able to crossfade them without doing so in a separate mixing session. CD Architect won't do it either.

    If the tracks are already mixed down to 44.1/16 then leave them that way. "Mix" them in a session at those parameters with whatever crossfade you desire. Now bounce this "new" track to its own file. Open the new file and add a track marker at the appropriate point.
     
  9. Brenguy

    Brenguy Guest

    THanks!!
     
  10. hueseph

    hueseph Well-Known Member

    Stay at 32 bit as long as possible. Dithering down to 16 bit should be the very last step you take.

    You should be able to create your montage and save/export it to a 16 bit montage file which you can then burn to cd.
     
  11. TheJackAttack

    TheJackAttack Distinguished Member

    What my esteemed colleague says is true inre 32 bit unless you are going to use the tracks you have already bounced to 16/44.1. IMHO already bounced tracks should remain at their new native rate etc to prevent further possibility of conversion errors.

    If you are remixing your original source files then stay at 32 float.
     
  12. hueseph

    hueseph Well-Known Member

    Yep. I wasn't arguing with that, just clarifying the other point.
     

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