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Question of a different level

Discussion in 'Recording' started by Hkureshi, May 23, 2005.

  1. Hkureshi

    Hkureshi Guest

    Hey ppl i know this might sound naive and all but i couldnt help but ask that lets say i have a guitar track to record and i am recording directly on the computer now my guitar track has some real loud part and some real soft parts. so how do i set my levels. U guys will definetly say that i can record at a set level where the high parts do not clip and later i can compress it and stuff so the soft parts can come up a little......now if i do that noise to signal ratio is always there to give out noise once the soft part is compressed and noise gates do have tendency to take away the timbre of your instrument .So my question is how do i record can i change levels thru preamp or whatever during recording of a single track ?
  2. schizojames

    schizojames Active Member

    Feb 15, 2005
    Home Page:
    Invite a lady-friend over and ask her to "ride the faders" for you while you play the guitar. If she doesn't slap you, then she will be a great help. Otherwise you could take the time to automate the volume levels within your host program. If you are using 24bits then there should be plently of information to work with below -6dB.
  3. Hkureshi

    Hkureshi Guest

    Now i am assuming that you're trying to be funny but i suppose there is bits and pieces of subliminal information in your reply which i still didnt quite get but thanks anyway
  4. Reggie

    Reggie Distinguished Member

    Dec 20, 2004
    Here is the subliminal part:

    "ride the faders"...while you play the guitar

    Otherwise...automate the volume levels within your host program.

    If you are using 24bits then there should be plently of information to work with below -6dB.
    If the volume change has to do with clean parts versus overdriven parts, perhaps you should record clean guitar on one track and the loud part on a separate track so they can be dealt with separately.
  5. jonnyc

    jonnyc Guest

    He may not have any idea what automation is. You should be able to adjust the levels of volume within the track. In pro tools a black line shows up over the track and you take the little hand and set a point and adjust the volumes. So if you're set at -3 thruout the track you can keep that main level and boost some parts and bring other parts back down. Thats automation. Whoever I usually record I just make the guitarist record two tracks, loud track and soft track, or clean and dirty.
  6. Hkureshi

    Hkureshi Guest

    thanks guys i know what automation is but isnt that like saying that you're compressing youre stuff and the core level like making the soft part come up a little and loud parts go down you know what iam saying
  7. axel

    axel Guest

    hmm... don't get me wrong, but how about taking the given advise and try it out if it does what you expect for your recording, does it sound right?, then use it. full stop, by the way it's a different result then compressing a single recorded track, you have lots of options / room afterwards with two tracks recorded... just experiment around a bit and LISTEN to what it does...

  8. Hkureshi

    Hkureshi Guest

    No actually its all clean guitars no overdriven parts its just that the dynamics of the way the guitars are being played changes u know one part soft the other hard
  9. tedcrop

    tedcrop Guest

    record seperate tracks and mix them seperately.
  10. Kurt Foster

    Kurt Foster Distinguished Member

    Jul 2, 2002
    77 Sunset Lane.
    So in other words, you can't play the soft part loud enough and the loud part soft enough?

    Do what the man said to do ... ride the faders while recording, automate the playback or record 2 different tracks those are the options. Any further questions put you in danger of being labeled a "troll".

    BTW, consider that most pop records have a dynamic range of only a few dBs. Extremely soft parts that get extremely loud are the hallmark of amateur recordists. :roll:
  11. Hkureshi

    Hkureshi Guest

    alright dude no more questions chill out

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