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qustions about drum recording

Discussion in 'Drums' started by chizknocka, Jan 1, 2008.

  1. chizknocka

    chizknocka Guest

    ok so i bought some mics for me drums but i dont know what goes between them and my pc, since well my pc doesnt come with 7 phantom powered condenser in's :).

    so what would i need, a mixer, would it have to be powered, or is there some other type of device used for this. a want to record everything on my pc, i have a nice sound card, again my question is: what goes between the end of the 7 mic cables and my 2 (red/white) component sound card in's and record each track(drum) individualy.

  2. Boswell

    Boswell Distinguished Moderator Resource Member

    Apr 19, 2006
    Home Page:
    No, you don't need a mixer for multi-track recording, but you do need a multi-channel interface. You can mix in software. Your sound card, however nice, is of no use in this application as it is a stereo (2-channel) device.

    So what you should be looking for is an 8-channel FireWire interface such as the Presonus FireStudio Project or the MOTU 8pre. If your computer does not yet have a FireWire card, get a PCI FireWire interface if you have a desktop or a Cardbus FireWire card if you have a laptop.

    This all begs the question of why you need seven microphones for your drumkit. Many great recordings have been made with a pair of decent overheads and a carefully chosen kick mic. Add a snare mic if you must, but more than that and the phasing issues start getting in the way of the sound quality.
  3. rockstardave

    rockstardave Active Member

    Mar 3, 2006
    +1 on what was already said.

    if you want a true multi track, you'll need an 8ch firewire interface like those listed.

    you could go the cheaper route and get a 8+ channel mixer. as long as there are at least 7 xlr inputs and it has phantom power you should be set. dont worry about a "powered mixer", the power they are talking about is the power necessary to run a PA (not phantom power, they are totally different things). then run the main outputs of the mixer (L and R) into your soundcard (Red and White).

    this second way wouldn't give you a true multitrack though, but it'll save you about $350.

    my 2 cents
  4. bent

    bent No Bad Vibes! Well-Known Member

    Oct 26, 2007
    Cocoa, FL
    Chiznocka, which make / model comprise the seven mics you bought?
  5. craigerb

    craigerb Guest

    Hi, long time drummer here, newb to DAW... thought I'd reply...

    I use 7 mics on my kit as well ... (6 piece CAD kit and 1 SM57)...I run them into my pc via channels 2-7 on my Presonus Firepod then use Nuendo software for mixing, etc....

    5 piece Yamaha Recording Custom - one (moving coil) mic on each tom (10, 12, 16,) SM57 on snare, 2 Overhead condensers, 1 kick drum mic....
    (no phase issues if you position mics smartly)

    I use the Nuendo stock gates and dynamics VST's/EQ's and then Waves Rverb on top of the drum group to give it some pop

    ....drum sounds are great for the budget, and easy to achieve with some tweaking and tips from forum browsing
  6. AwedOne

    AwedOne Guest

    Boswell wrote:

    Ya know, I've seen lots of videos of studio sessions, from jazz to metal, where the drums are all mic'd up, and the sound is superlative.

    I think it's more a matter of what type of sound you're looking for. If you want a "big room" sound and you've got a big room, then yeah, 3-4 mic's would capture that. If you're recording a Gospel, Mass Choir type, then the ability to create seperate and distinct EQ's for hi hat, snare, and kick is vital.

    If like me, you're recording in a small drum room with lousy acoustics, then what works best for my situation is 7 mics: kick, snare, 3 toms, hi hat and one OH behind me.
  7. Cucco

    Cucco Distinguished Member

    Mar 8, 2004
    Fredericksburg, VA
    Not possible...

  8. craigerb

    craigerb Guest

    maybe i should have said "no real nasty phasing"... newb here...

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