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Rack Gear

Discussion in 'Pro Audio Equipment' started by northshorenoob, Jan 28, 2005.

  1. I am very new to the whole rack thing and I was wondering how I would be able to hook a simple compressor up to all 8 channels on my mixer. Is this possible or do I compress after recorded or how does it work? Thanks
  2. DaveRunyan

    DaveRunyan Active Member

    Dec 13, 2004
    IT depends on what you are recording. I find myself compressing some tracks while recording if I know it will benifit from it like bass guitar, vocals and sometimes acoustic guitar if the player is all over the place. Other things I wait to see if they need it when I mix. If you want to compress all 8 channels at the time of recording then you will need 8 compressors or 4 stereo ones. Same goes for mix down if you are summing to a mixer unless you only compress the mix/master bus.

    Just a note to remember. If you compress everything all the time you may find you are adding a bunch of noise in the long run as well as killing the "life" of a performance. Use a compressor only when you need it.
  3. What would I need to compress on drums? And what about noise gates? Wouldn't I have to run noise gates on every channel while recording?
  4. Massive Mastering

    Massive Mastering Distinguished Member

    Jul 18, 2004
    Chicago area, IL, USA
    Home Page:
    You basically need one channel of comression for each channel you need to compress. Same with noise gates.

    Some pointers...

    * If your not sure if the track needs it, best to leave it alone.

    * Compression and gating during recording is discouraged unless you REALLY know what you're going for - Once it's there, you're stuck with it.

    * On gates, keep in mind that leakage that sounds good is called "ambience" and amibience that sounds bad is called "leakage" - In other words, the same rules apply - Don't go around throwing gates on everything unless it's called for.

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