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Reaktor Vs. MAX/MSP

Discussion in 'Recording' started by Kruddler, Jul 6, 2011.

  1. Kruddler

    Kruddler Active Member

    I recently bought Native Instruments Komplete package. I was quite dissapointed to find that a lot of standard stuff seemed to be missing from the package. For example, there was no such thing as a standalone High Pass VST effect. After some research I found that all the bits and pieces I was looking for are contained in Reaktor. My first is impression of Reaktor was: what the hell is this clunky piece of crap? This is nothing like my other vsts!

    But, being a programmer I began investigating and came across the vast array of various synths and effects that people had created using Reaktor. I'm now completely turned around on the idea and can see that a platform like Reaktor is what I need to go forward and build sounds that were previously impossible to build.

    Let me just preface this by saying: these kind of platforms are the way of the future! I've already come across some of my favourite synths and effects in Reaktor. But, before I get carried away and start programming and building in Reaktor, I need to make sure that I am investing my time on the right platform. Could someone please enlighten me about the differences between Max and Reaktor?

    Particularly I'm interested in:
    • Programming Model (Language, object oriented?, easy to learn? overly verbose syntax?)
    • Built in algorithms (e.g. Reaktor has built in high pass/low pass, reverb etc)
    • Cross platform compatibility (works on Mac and Windows)
    • Limitations (Am I going to hit a wall at some point with Reaktor? Are there just more people creating better quality Max synths?)
    • Strengths (is there something that one of the platforms does particularly well)
    Also, I use Ableton Live, so is Max for Live the complete Max product? Max For Live is cheaper than straight up Max. If there are other platforms out there that rival Reaktor and MAX for quality and flexibility, I would like to hear it but please focus on the comparison between the two.

    I'd love to hear some educated opinions on this.
     
  2. Kruddler

    Kruddler Active Member

    Doesn't anyone even know what I am talking about?
     
  3. IIRs

    IIRs Well-Known Member

    I know what you're talking about. But I've never used Max (or Live) so I can't provide the comparison you're asking for.

    Reaktor is a monster however: seeing as you already own it you should probably dive in and try building a simple synth or effect. If Max provides a demo version you can then do the same in that...

    My limited knowledge of Max suggests to me that its more of a generalised programming environment, capable of handling graphics and video etc. Think of Reaktor as a synth that is so deeply modular that it is almost a programming language.

    Reaktor comes with a large library of building blocks (plus a huge online user library), so if its purely audio dsp stuff you want to build Reaktor might get you there quicker.
     
  4. Kruddler

    Kruddler Active Member

    Almost a programming language?

    I was under the impression that there was some kind of programming language underneath the hood. I hadn't investigated it though.

    From what I read, Max uses Java which would be a big plus. I'll have to post on the NI forums to figure out whether or no Reaktor even has a programming language.
     
  5. IIRs

    IIRs Well-Known Member

    You won't be writing any code in Reaktor: its all about connecting modules with virtual cables. But you get to manipulate arrays of data via the Table modules, and the core cells allow for some serious DSP trickery.

    I suggest you give it a try!
     
  6. Kruddler

    Kruddler Active Member

    Yeah I will. But, a rule of thumb as a programmer has always been:

    1) Try to design software so that the configuration thereof can be done without code
    2) Allow for writing code just in case.

    It worries me that there's no coding in Reaktor.

    To go completely off topic here. We give our customer two options to write their business logic: workflow or code. Code is always chosen because workflow (connecting boxes up like Reaktor) is just a clunkier way of writing code.
     
  7. IIRs

    IIRs Well-Known Member

    How you getting on with Reaktor?

    I've just released a tutorial video which you might find useful...
     
  8. Kruddler

    Kruddler Active Member

    Well, I should have just jumped in to this by now. But, I still don't have ay feedback from anyone about the differences between the two platforms so I haven't started building anything.

    I'm reluctant to get started with Reaktor because quite frankly, it looks old and clunky. I don't want to spend my time coming to understand a platform and then realise that I would have been better off with Max.

    Anyway, I'll be buying Max for Live soon. I'll probably start when I get that.
     
  9. Kruddler

    Kruddler Active Member

    I have both now. I'm building Max patches really quickly and easily. +1 For M4L.

    Reaktor may have more processing ability, but the user interface sucks, and you can't do things like automate external parameters.

    I'm having great fun making patches that modulate parameters on external VSTs.
     
  10. kev037

    kev037 Member

    yeap

    U were right krud,comparing all the software vsti's i have,
    i find reaktor more efficient in audio processing and full-on RAM usage,
    Being technical most of the vsti's hold the same story of osc,env,delay,lfo,filter,fx,
    But reaktor synths are entirely different and its unique from other vsti's,
    chilling on with my new year production brought the icing on cake,
    some people find automation features,editing all sucks with reaktor,
    what i feel is,we wont get all we need with one interface,we gotta
    manipulate the best out with which we got,incase of reaktor,we
    oughta bring the best sounds out,so its basically our efforts and
    experimentation.
     

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