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Recording Clean Guitar

Discussion in 'Guitars' started by phatsam, Mar 6, 2008.

  1. phatsam

    phatsam Guest

    What is the best way to mix clean guitar? The guitar parts are mostly ska upbeats and there are a few clean guitar riffs.
     
  2. BrianaW

    BrianaW Active Member

    Hi,
    In Ska music I hear a lot of cut (maybe even high passing) up to about 150hz, maybe higher depending on the chords. Usually they stick to major triads on the G,B,+ E strings. If they are going any lower you may want to just cut to 100. Bump the low mids a little (400k or around there).Then you spank the heck out of it with compression with a faster attack... 2.5 maybe? Then you raise the highs around 2-5k... sometimes even stretching back to 1k. Don't shelve it tho, use a wide Q.

    That's just what I personally hear in a lot of Ska, and they usually use single coils in the neck position so the boosts I recommended are assuming there's a mid scoop from the pickup.. Depends on what the guitarist was using, and what you have on tape. Just keep it pretty dry and tight. I'm no expert, but I hope this helps at least a little.
     
  3. phatsam

    phatsam Guest

    Thank you much!
     
  4. Hydrowolftd

    Hydrowolftd Guest

    this might not help but my guitar doesnt sound the best for recording clean but i find that it sounds decent if i directly output from the amp into the mixer rather than mic-ing a clean amp. i also turn the volume down on the guitar probably half way if im using reverb at all and it keeps it pretty calm and clean.
     
  5. TheFraz

    TheFraz Active Member

    If clean tones be what you require, look for nor further then the big brother of squire.


    alright, now that my rhyming is done with. nothing, in my mind, tops the great clean tones of a nice tube fender. I am a personal fan of the twin reverb. its affordable, and flexible. and its full out classic fender tones.
     

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