1. Register NOW and become part of this fantastic knowledge base forum! This message will go away once you have registered.

Recording post hardcore/hardcore drums

Discussion in 'Drums' started by NocturnalGrad, Aug 10, 2005.

  1. Ok First...equipment: Right now I'm still in the market for more equipment but this is what I have...digi002 console, G5, D6, 6 SM57, 1 SM beta 58,
    I still need 2 condensor mics and a mic pre...either 4 or 8 channel to hook up to the 002.

    How would I go about recording drums for that genre...I'm hearing a lot using triggers...coated heads...

    Its hard to pick a spot to start so how about starting at the basics then moving on.

    The drummer uses A custom cymbals, pearl snare, but his drum set is a bit shady but will work. Hes a excellant drummer when it comes to different time signatures and 32nd and 64 notes on the double pedal. I believe his kick has a aquarium kick heads with a 8" hole.

    Any other information that you need to help me out..just let me know. thanks
     
  2. geeknik

    geeknik Guest

    Hey dude. I primarilly record this genre and am just getting started myself.

    I recently purchased a Tascam FW-1884, Behringer ADA-8000 for a total of 16 pres into my PC. Drumagog is what I have tinkered with for sampling the drums but the problem is I don't think it is available for mac. I know there are options out there for you that will produce very similar results. I think one is called apptrigga??? My drummer has an awesome kit but we used pretty crappy mic's, Audix fusion kit. We came out with some pretty decent results. http://www.eastkentuckysound.com/ROTM3.mp3 ... we were just playing around when we cut this sample. We cut vox on a cheap Behringer B-1 condenser and guitars using sm-57.

    For post-hardcore and hardcore...if it is old school or some newer posi type stuff I would stay away from triggers. However we are friends with a lot of big name drummers, like the drummer from underoath (see your avatar), and the drummer from haste the day, still remains, as i lay dying, etc etc we have played with em all. ALL of those guys use triggers to record. They may have more of a "new school" sound and somewhat more metal than some hardcore bands however. On our sample mp3 I didnt sample the kick because I didn't have a good sample to use. I have a posi hardcore band coming through on monday and I am going to test the waters out with drumamgog then.

    If you have a link to some of your stuff i'd love to hear it!!!
     
  3. jonnyc

    jonnyc Member

    You really don't need to use triggered sounds or any kind of soundreplacer although a lot of guys in that genre use them. I'm a firm believer in making the kit sound as good as possible and get the mics placed correctly. I just use eq and compression and some creative mixing to get the sounds the heavy guys are looking for. One trick to try, mic the beater side of the kick drum and in the hole, you'll get a good combo of click and boom which seems to be essential in harder music.
     
  4. geeknik

    geeknik Guest

    I am thinking about trying this technique next week. Making 1 sample... and using drumagog to replace the sound throughout.
     
  5. So are those drum programs for PC only or are there any Mac versions?
     
  6. geeknik

    geeknik Guest

    I think Drumagog is only for the PC at the current time. Apptrigga is for mac and I think there is something else you can use too just not sure what it is called.
     
  7. bobbo

    bobbo Active Member

    re

    ask them what kind of sound they want, if they want it kinda raw, is it for a demo, is it for an actual full length project. how much are you getting paid, is it worth your time to use a sound replacer program, etc.

    I've got very good results from just using eq and compression to get everything to stand out and be heard, remember to use panning and eq cutting to fit everyone into the mix.

    It takes lots of practice, and lots of trial and error, having some mics and a 002 isn't going to give you a hit recording if you are inexpeirenced.

    After you find out how the band/drummer wants the drums to sound like, (natural, hyped, mixture, compressed, ambient, etc) then go from there, expierement with mic placement prior to recording that band (if possible) in the space you are going to record the drums, and then move stuff around, then you have somewhat of an idea of where to place stuff, now i know that when you get that drummer in with his own drums his own cymbals and hitting velocity, its going to sound different, but you had practiced the basics.

    thats my 2 cents
     
  8. sickyboy

    sickyboy Guest

    I also am going to try this. Somebody told me a 57 is a good mic for the beater side. Going to use a D112 for the hole.
     
  9. geeknik

    geeknik Guest

    Same here. We rented a D112 at a shop for $20 for a month.
     
  10. Well actually I'm the bassist in the band with the drummer. So I know the sound that he wants but I'm not sure how well I can capture it with the 002 and some dynamic and large/small diaphragm condensor mics in a well acoustic sounding room (LxW1xW2XH: 21'x12'x13'x7'). I would like to try something with space like album from The Used, Maybe Memories, if that doesn't work then maybe something like an As I lay Dying sound.

    When we start recording, we're going to try to record in that same room playing together and seperate. I know going seperate will sound better, but with our style of music it will btake some time to get use to when playing to a click track and playing to the recorded drums or guitar or bass. But the drummer is pretty aggerisive with his dynamics. I have mentioned to him during parts of the song to 'play the mics' with his kit. Cause I'm not sure if its possilbe to mic everything on kit.

    This will be a E.P. project, 5 to 6 songs. Up this point as our history in a band, we mangaged to had made 4 demo cds...which are all horrible but ppl to buy them anyway. So since I'm really interesting into recording, I turned my bed room into a studio.
     
  11. geeknik

    geeknik Guest

    I don't know how you do it but this is what we always have done.

    Record drums and in a seperate room from all the other instruments OR line the instruments into the board. This way you can get a scratch track of all the guitars etc. You will keep the drum track and go in and re-record all the guitar parts.

    It works out good for us anyway.
     
  12. sickyboy

    sickyboy Guest

    Thats the way to do it. I put a D112 half way in the hole and a 57 on the outskirts of the beater side. Sounds great, that Korn sound. I didnt even comp or eq, sounded nearly perfect dry. Dont get me wrong, upgradeing to the D112 a day ago was a huge difference from that audix fusion pak one. LOL
     
  13. Yea...thats another way to do it too. We'll probably end up doing it that way. Probably just D.I. the guitar the guitar and send it through the headphones for our drummer, maybe a click track for both the drummer and guitarist...but w/e works we'll stick with.

    What do you use to mic the O.H. with?
     
  14. geeknik

    geeknik Guest

    I am just getting started to be honest so I have Audix Fusion Drum mic kit. Their are 2 condenser mics that come with it. I am using those for the time being. They actually sound pretty good. I am doing a session for a posi hardcore band in the morning. I hope to have some samples for you guys by midweek.
     
  15. That would be great!
     
  16. bobbo

    bobbo Active Member

    re

    i've got something i did in my makeshift practice space studio, i'll post it when i get home. its hardcore (i don't know all the diff hardcore genres), nothing was sound replaced, and the kick didn't come out the way i like due to not having enough damping on the kick, but it still cuts through and the drummer hits reallllly loud, exept on his tom rolls so his tom fills are very quiet. but you'll see. I tried to go for the converge overhead sound, kinda squashed. and it is alittle bit.

    later,
     
  17. geeknik

    geeknik Guest

    I recorded a band yesterday and have one song mixed. The singer is a little out of time in parts but I am going to post this on here so you guys can check my mixing and recording. I think it came out pretty good, and made the band sound pretty good. I'll put it up as soon as I make an mp3.
     
  18. geeknik

    geeknik Guest

    http://www.eastkentuckysound.com/mp3/somegaveall/sga.mp3

    This is what I did this weekend. The kick could've been better because half way through the session the mic fell out of the holder inside the kick drum!!! but it came out decent. The band isn't that great but you get a good idea. Let me know what I can do to get this sounding better.
     
  19. bobbo

    bobbo Active Member

    re

    here is short clip i have for the hardcore/metal sound i said i would post

    http://www.songramp.com/view.ez?sampleid=34637

    i really hate how this guys drums sound, the kick needed more dampning, and the snare is way too tight, but hey i did this for free for them, and i think it turned out somewhat ok, and wish i would have stuck with a dynamic mic for screams but i was too much into playing with my new tube mic, the groove tubes gt66 at the time that after scratch vox were done we were so pressed with time we weren't able to switch back after we had started the od vox, th e vox was just not "dirty" enough for him, he wanted it to be more dull and sound like him practicing or playing with the entire band, so that cristal clear tube mic didn't help him get the grungy sound so i just ran his vox through my radius 30 comp and crushed the $*^t out it and got it to break up a little bit on mix down.

    nothing was sound replaced, just the dude hitting the skins, and everything compressed as $*^t. i compressed those oh's so much, that i really didn't even need the tom mics turned on.

    later
    bobby
     
  20. zkaudio

    zkaudio Active Member

    maye sure you understand what will happen to polarity when you mic toms from the top or bottom... same with kick. Remember that when a kick drum is hit you want your speakers to initially push out, not in. Same for all drums. Also go track by track and line up the zero points after correcting polarity. I have found that it is easier when recording genres like this to keep the room very dead and add in atmosphere after the fact.. that way if you want VERY present, dry drums, it is easy.
     

Share This Page