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recording various percussions:what mic would be the best

Discussion in 'Percussion' started by yasuyoshik, Nov 13, 2001.

  1. yasuyoshik

    yasuyoshik Guest

    hi, I am newbie here and i wanna ask to experienced people here.
    what would be the best mic for recording verious percussions? I am working with latin percussion player. my budget is limited..s o I need one mic, which can record various kind of percussions.
    thanx, yasu
     
  2. Ang1970

    Ang1970 Well-Known Member

    This may have been suggested before, but at the risk of being redundant...

    SM57!!!
     
  3. hargerst

    hargerst Distinguished Member

    The SM57 is always a safe choice, but if you have phantom power available, try the Behringer ECM8000, a small omni reference mic that retails for $35. One of the best values around. I usually wind up using a small diameter condenser mic for recording percussion (1/2" or less).
     
  4. riconga

    riconga Member

    you will find that mic placement will make a much bigger difference than mic selection whichever one you choose.
     
  5. yasuyoshik

    yasuyoshik Guest

    thanx for replying to my question.
    I will check out mics you have mentioned. I have one more question. is it okay to record other perc (such as shakers and guiros) with same mic for congas? I jus wondering... If their sounds texture is different from congas and snars, should I use different mics for that percs?

    thank you, yasu
     
  6. hargerst

    hargerst Distinguished Member

    I've been using small omni mics to record percussion for the last couple of years, and the results have been pretty good. Yesterday, I recorded some congas with a Behringer ECM8000 and everybody seemed very pleased with the final product. The ECM8000s are similar to my Audix TR-40 omnis and both work well for drum overheads, congas, tambourines, guiros, shakers, etc.
     
  7. Bear's Gone Fission

    Bear's Gone Fission Active Member

    Damn, Harvey, Behringer?! Is this a "it's great for $35" sort of deal or does it stand up well to the TR-40? Trying to save for the modular MBHO stuff, so if they'll get me some mileage before they die . . .

    Bear
     
  8. Ang1970

    Ang1970 Well-Known Member

    Originally posted by yasu:
    is it okay to record other perc (such as shakers and guiros) with same mic for congas? I jus wondering... If their sounds texture is different from congas and snars, should I use different mics for that percs?

    No, there is no rule that you have to do that. If you did have several mics, it would give you the opportunity to listen with each and decide which sounds best for that particular instrument. But if you only have one, the recording police aren't gonna give you a ticket or arrest you. Like riconga suggested, mic placement can go a long way to getting the sound you want.
     
  9. e-cue

    e-cue Active Member

    Originally posted by Bear's Gone Fission:
    Damn, Harvey, Behringer?! Is this a "it's great for $35" sort of deal or does it stand up well to the TR-40? Trying to save for the modular MBHO stuff, so if they'll get me some mileage before they die . . .

    Bear

    I endorse Berhinger gear. Most people don't believe it sounds good because it's so cheap & dis their gear before they have even heard it. The ECM8000's are great for OH's, and I sometimes use them in place of 414's/orU87's now.
    Roles ribbon mics have given me some killer results on percussion. And, oh yeah SM57. If you don't have time to 'learn' these other mics.. roll with the 57.
     
  10. hargerst

    hargerst Distinguished Member

    I don't bash Behringer gear, but I don't think I've ever recommended any Behringer gear except for this one piece. It does sound like my Audix TR-40 - so far, EXACTLY like it. I've used it on just a few instruments so far, so all my testing isn't done yet, but it sure looks like it's gonna be a real winner.
     
  11. About that Behringer mike: can it handle louder sources?

    /Mats
     
  12. riconga

    riconga Member

    $*^t, now Im gonna have to try a beringer! I would add that chekere guiro and cha cha bells can be pretty nasty with any mic. try whichever mic you end up off axis and experiment with distance bleed from these insruments can ruin a recording so its possible you may want to roll off some high end.use a little compression on congas and timbales they like it and will be easier to mix. lately Ive been micing a three conga set up with one cardiod pointed staight down the middle from about 16 inches up. not good if bleeds gonna be a problem but its a pretty good fast setup and sounds better than you might think. good luck
    yours in clave, rick
     
  13. hargerst

    hargerst Distinguished Member

    Mats, it's rated at around 130 dB max SPL, so that should be pretty safe. The sensitivity is around 14mV/Pa, so that translates to about -36dB signal input, about 20 dB hotter than a dynamic.
     
  14. Thanks for the info Harvey.

    Well, I guess there's not much at stake here.
    Two Behringers will cost me less than one SM57...

    And if I don't like them, I could always pack them with a portable DAT for low-cost field recordings... I get questions almost every week about rental services but does not want people I don't know well use our stuff outside of the studio.

    /Mats
     
  15. Bear's Gone Fission

    Bear's Gone Fission Active Member

    I got a pair of the ECM8000's at Geetar Center (aigh). No time to put them through paces yet. Beware the latches on the cases, one broke instantly. Clips are included, which is nice, seem pretty durable. I've got my acoustic six string in nashville tuning, so that and my twelve ought to give a good idea of the mics' detail and any rough areas.

    Is the jangling keys thing for mics or pres or both? I'll try to get a shaker egg groving, too.

    Bear
     
  16. Bear's Gone Fission

    Bear's Gone Fission Active Member

    So far, I'm damned happy with the ECM8000. I'm listening on my stock Allen & Heath CMC board and Otari MX-5050 8HSD 1/2" 8 track, and a lot of cans vs. room comparison in real time. It's not exactly like being there, but it gets pretty nice on detail and accuracy, giving a sound that's very faithful to the acoustic guitar in the room. No real coloration detectable, no tonal change I wouldn't be able to isolate from my rig.

    Self noise could be a problem on solo tracks or quiet instruments, but I expected that one. The pickup seems very sensitive (I could hear my sweetie talking to the dog down the hall quite clearly), so this could exacerbate a noisy room. Shouldn't be much of a problem for loud or active sources, though.

    A pair of these and a pair of MXL 603s's and a guy could be pretty content until he could afford the deluxe small diaphragm condensor stuff.

    Thanks, Harvey!

    Bear
     
  17. Greg Malcangi

    Greg Malcangi Member

    << percussions:what mic would be the best? >>

    This is an impossible question to answer. There are so many variables which affect the sound captured by a mic: The acoustic of the live room, the make of instrument, the playing style of the musician, the rest of the gear in your recording chain and of course the type of sound required by the producer.

    So, I could say to you that for the best sound I prefer to use 2 Beyer MC740's to record marimba. But in your studio with different musicians, acoustics, styles, etc., an MC740 may not give you the sound you were after at all.

    In other words, I'm sure you are gaining a lot of useful information from this thread but you should bare in mind that what works great for someone in one situation may sound crap in another. I know this is a PITA, but that's what makes engineering and producing an art form rather than a pure science! :)

    Greg
     
  18. yasuyoshik

    yasuyoshik Guest

    thanx all.. I got enough info. As sound engineer/ producer, I am an amature, yet I totally agree with Greg in his last post. The performance of each equipment can be vary in the situations it will be in use. I jus began my career (or can I call it as hobby?) in a bedroom studio. I would like to have flexibilities and knowledge to adapt myself to verious studio enviroments. I would like to thank you all for sharing ur experience and thoughts on this issue :)
    thank you, Yasu
     

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