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recording with a Line6 UX2 POD

Discussion in 'Recording' started by clapp26, Jun 29, 2010.

  1. clapp26

    clapp26 Guest

    Hello all,

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    This is my first post on the forums. I signed up to hopefully broaden my horizons and learn more about recording. I'm currently using a Line6 UX2 POD running into my laptop for my acoustic/ele, electric, bass, and vocals. I have been using FL Studio to make my drum beats (which isn't working out too well). I have a few questions...

    1) Does anyone else have a POD that they are using for recording? If so, what are your experiences with it?

    2) Would I be better off buying a multitrack recorder for recording?

    3) What is the best way to record drums? I personally do not have a drum set nor do I play drums, so the only way I know of right now is to use .wav files that I find online or use FL studio. Obviously it is going to be hard to record drums if I can't even play them.

    4) When putting a song together, what instrument do you normally record first?

    Any and all help is appreciated. Thanks!

    Brandon
     
  2. niclaus

    niclaus Active Member

    Hey!

    Welcome to RO.

    I bought the first version of the Pod like almost 10 years ago now, but i never used it to record a proper session.
    I used it to rehearse or so at home during the night so i wouldn't wake everyone, but it's nothing compare to the real pressure and feeling comin out of a real speaker.
    Lots of people have been using them for the last few years, and the problem is that you soon find yourself havin the exact same sound as the guy next door, which is not what i'm looking for when recording something.

    Even though I'm sure the newer versions are a lot better it doesn't change what i feel about those...
    I might use it for a fill or two, but i wouldn't do the main tracks through it...

    Anyway, that's how I feel.

    I don't know anything about FLstudio but i have been using BFD a couple of times and i found it pretty good (that's if you have the extra libraries).

    Hope it helps.

    N.
     
  3. clapp26

    clapp26 Guest

    I believe that I feel the exact same way about them... it seems like more of a headache to me than anything else. I have crackles/pops/latency to deal with when I'm using it, and it would be amazing if I could actually record a full 3 minutes without the thing crackling or stopping for 2-3 seconds.

    Would you suggest a multitrack recorder? If so, do you think 8 tracks would be enough?

    I'm not sure what all I can do on a multitrack recorder but I'd rather record into something that was made to record music THEN export it to the PC for mixing and editing.
     
  4. niclaus

    niclaus Active Member

    I was talking more about the amp emulation thing than the interface in itself.
    Maybe you could start by using a simple mic on a guitar cabinet. That would be a start.

    What is the software you are recording into?
     
  5. McLaughlin

    McLaughlin Active Member

    Hi Clapp,
    If I were you, and looking for a quick and easy jump into recording (if such a thing exists), I'd look into the Pro Tools Mbox 2 line, and depending on budget, the 002/003 racks. I'm very biased towards Pro Tools however. With a little Mbox setup you can get a professional level interface, not to mention the software itself. You'll still be able to use your POD, and Pro Tools also comes with a few different Amp Simulators built in.

    You can even just pick up a SM57 and record your guitar amp straight into it. A 57 will only run you about $99 new, and you'll have it for the rest of your life as its a go to cab mic at any level studio.

    What you'll also get, is a version of Reason, and Ableton which you can also use for your drum sampling/sequencing, and rewire those straight into Pro Tools. These two programs are far superior to any experience I've had with FL.
     
  6. niclaus

    niclaus Active Member

    Listen to McLaughlin, he's right. That'd be a first step!!!
     
  7. clapp26

    clapp26 Guest

    Thanks for the help guys, I'll look into getting those. I am using a Line6 UX2 TonePort POD (the old toneport model, not the newer UX2's) but I got the crackling and latency to stop by changing my buffer size.

    I've used Ableton before and liked it a lot, but then changed to Acid Pro 7 in an attempt to fix the crackling.

    I picked up a concert mic for about $50 and it seems to sound great coming through the POD, but I will definitely consider the 57 later on if it is better.

    My Line6 POD that I'm using comes with GearBox as the software to use the pod with, and has a lot of effects.

    I'll look into getting Reason also, and did like Ableton more than Acid because it seemed to have more features available. I have a friend who uses FL studio for his beats (he's into techno/DJ rave beats and I'm into country/rock) and I'm not sure that I can accomplish what I am wanting with FL.
     
  8. soapfloats

    soapfloats Well-Known Member

    If you plan on recording more than guitar, I'd suggest you look into a proper interface - something w/ firewire and 8 input channels/preamps.

    The 002/003 that McLaughlin suggests is the type of device I am talking about.
    However, I must caution against PT. While it is "the industry standard", PT forces you to use certain interfaces.
    I generally don't like companies that make you use ONLY something made by them or a partner company.
    I want portability and flexibility.

    MOTU, Presonus, and others make devices on par w/ or better than the 002/003 racks, IMHO.
    Furthermore, you can use them w/ any DAW (and they all come w/ a "light" version of some really nice ones).

    Finally, should you choose to upgrade, you'll find it a lot easier and cheaper outside of PT/Digidesign/M-Audio.
    Case in point: I recently upgraded from my Presonus Firestudio (like an 003) to an RME Fireface 800.
    More channels, better conversion, better preamps, better routing, better everything. Can't use it w/ PT.
    To get something similar/better than the RME, you'd have to go to PT HD, and spend thousands of dollars.
    My RME cost me $1500. You do the math.

    Disclaimer: There are advantages to PT and its sister-products. There may even be a way to achieve something like my RME upgrade w/o going HD.
    I prefer to build my own modular system, however, and use the gear I want, not the gear they say I have to.
     

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