Removing reverb on vocals?

Discussion in 'Mixing & Editing' started by nellie, Mar 21, 2005.

  1. nellie

    nellie Guest

    I recorded our jazz-funk band at a gig last week. I took the female vocal input from the Aux 2 send on the PA mixer but didn't realise that it had reverb on it, and it's too wet. Doh.
    Do you have any tips on reducing it? I'm using Sonar 4 but any hints would be welcome.
  2. jonyoung

    jonyoung Well-Known Member

    Dec 31, 2003
    Would it be against your standards to have the vocalist come over and cut new tracks at home? It would probably take less time and certainly be more effective. You could do it "live" (one pass, no punches).
  3. huub

    huub Guest

    just put a vocal dereverbifier plugin across it...
  4. JonLewis

    JonLewis Guest

    “Vocal dereverbifier plugin”, I hope you are kidding. Sometimes I think these CSI shows do a disservice to the industry. I've had people ask me to split up the different elements of a recording. “You know, like they do on TV.”

    Back to reality, you might be able to get rid of some of it with gating, EQ and maybe some compression/expansion, but you wont like what it does to the vocals. With just some careful gating you will be able to shorten the decay, but the original reverb will still be there to some extent NO MATTER WHAT YOU DO.

    Your best bet is to try to re-cut the vocals, but that may not work so hot either due to the bleed into all of the other mics on stage. Live recordings are very difficult to impossible to replace something that was there in the original performance, even with each mic tracked separately. Sorry to say, you may be stuck with just dealing with it.

    Good luck,
  5. nellie

    nellie Guest

    Thanks for the replies guys - but as I thought - not really an easy solution. Jon - you're right about the bleed, so I'll try some gating which may reduce it somewhat.
  6. Dave62

    Dave62 Guest

    I have had good luck recutting "Live" vocals by using the same mic as live, and having the singer sing in the control room to the mains. This puts some of the live wash back into the recording, although the performance has to be very exact or you might hear echo's of the original in the other tracks.
  7. rhydian

    rhydian Active Member

    Jan 26, 2005
    Southwell, Nottingham, UK


    Regarding the dereverbifier! convolution technology may be able to remove the reverb by creating a reverse impulse in theory, but I don't know of any software that allows you to reverse the impuse. Any innovators out there? It's mathematically like reversing an algorithm.... :wink:
  8. Dave62

    Dave62 Guest

    Just read this in another thread about snare and hihat leakage thought it might work here.
    Take your Eq'd edited vocal track and bnc it so it is a unified region with no extra effects or inserts in its track. Then copy it to another empty track and invert it. Make sure it is panned the same and the volume is equal. With these two tracks soloed You should now not hear anything because of 100% phase cancellation. Then insert a compressor in both tracks leaving the threshold of the main track full on so it doesn't do any thing. Compress the heck out of the inverted track. The onset of compression on the inverted track will now cause the main track vocal to pop thru and will silence out the reverb when the compressor cuts out. This takes a bit of adjustment with the attack /release /comp settings but it works very well on snare drums and doesn't sound like a gate. The compressor on the main track is only there to make sure the delay is the same.
  9. audiofreqs

    audiofreqs Guest

    digital fish phones has a free transient designer plugin that MIGHT work for you. basically what it does is controls the attack and SUSTAIN of a sound source. i figure if she's not singing too fast, you might be able to tame the sustain of the reverb.
    here's the link to the plugin:

    (Dead Link Removed)

    vst only

    good luck!!
  10. nellie

    nellie Guest

    Thanks, guys,
    Some good ideas here. I'll try them both.
  11. dpd

    dpd Active Member

    Sep 29, 2004
    well, if you know exactly what you put in, you could take it out. Call me sometime next century....

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