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Rode NT1A?

Discussion in 'Vocals' started by mannyr, May 24, 2009.

  1. mannyr

    mannyr Active Member

    How good is this mic for vocals?
     
  2. Guitarfreak

    Guitarfreak Well-Known Member

    It's good but you need an interface to use it.
     
  3. mannyr

    mannyr Active Member

    I have a BLUE interface/preamp with 48V phantom power. will that work?

    and does an interface always have a preamp built in?
     
  4. Guitarfreak

    Guitarfreak Well-Known Member

    That icicle you are toting won't make the most of the Rode. It would be a waste of money if you ask me. The icicle is the weakest link in your chain as it is, and if you ask me it needs replacing if you want higher quality vocal work.

    Keep Rockin though lml :twisted: lml
    -Jake
     
  5. mannyr

    mannyr Active Member

    Well, first of all whats better SM58+Icicle or NT1A+Icicle.

    And second, some people tell me the icicle is fine, others say it's doing a bad job, but can anyone just tell me WHY it's the "weakest link"?? Does it have a bad reputation? Has anyone even used it when they tell me its bad? Its getting good reviews and it says its "high quality" input.. but I just would like to know WHY its so bad.
     
  6. Guitarfreak

    Guitarfreak Well-Known Member

    First of all, don't listen to advertisements. They are trying to sell a product, and they did. A 58 and nt1 through an icicle won't be much different, it isn't until you get better hardware that the differences in mics will really start to show.

    The bottom line is that you are trying to put a Corvette engine in a used Buick and roll up to the drag strip for a day at the tracks. The icicle isn't bad, but it isn't good either. It lacks the features and flexibility that will make great recordings.
     
  7. mannyr

    mannyr Active Member

    I understand, it's just - I'm not looking for top of the line quality here. I am on a budget, and what I'm making is a demo CD that will probably maybe go on iTunes. The only thing I care about is not getting a wet, ametuer karaoke sound. I want a decent, quasi-pro sound that makes the vocals flow and assimilate into the music and not be some karaoke ameteur. I want it to be passable, I'll be sending this to record companies haha. So will what I have accomplish that minimal task?
     
  8. Guitarfreak

    Guitarfreak Well-Known Member

    If you noticed in your last thread nobody recommended a condenser, nobody even said a new mic would solve your problem. But a few of us did say that a new interface was in order. Trust us, you can get a professional sound out of a 58, many studios do. You asked the professionals, you got your response, now you make your decision.

    ...no pressure 8)
     
  9. Codemonkey

    Codemonkey Well-Known Member

    Dude, the Icicle is fine. Does it do the job? Does it give you headaches? Does it work? Right. Keep it, until you have money to be upgrading.

    I'd rather know how to use an ugly, bent $5 hammer than own a $100 hammer made of polished chrome, but not know how to use it properly.
     
  10. mannyr

    mannyr Active Member

    Thanks, I mean all the other USB interfaces are very very expensive. But is it true that SM58 and NT1A will sound the exact same with this icicle? I'm looking for a difference in voice definition, like hearing those little nuances in the voice that make it sound more real. I thought a condenser mic would pick those up better.

    And can I use a windscreen instead of a pop filter on a condensor? Will it work?
     
  11. Guitarfreak

    Guitarfreak Well-Known Member

    He said in his last thread that 58 + icicle didn't sound good, and in his sound clip there were some obvious problems. This could also be user error though. I didn't think of that though. Codemonkey damn you :evil: . Why must you confuse our young disciple. Maybe he just needs a good spanking and a lesson in gain structuring.

    And I did not say they would sound exactly the same, but that it won't be night and day difference. I just think if you are willing to spend over 200 on a mic you could drop that same amount or a little more on a better interface.
     
  12. Codemonkey

    Codemonkey Well-Known Member

    Maybe he does, but you don't need to spend money to be good.

    If you want nuances, go for the condenser. Bear in mind those "nuances" will include the acoustics of your room and any background noise like computer fans or HVAC...
     
  13. mannyr

    mannyr Active Member

    The only real problem was the distortion in the voice.. which is definately the gain issue since I turned it up all the way and when it's lower that problem doesn't happen.
     
  14. mannyr

    mannyr Active Member

    Well see I'm offered the NT1A at a verrrryyy low good price. The seller also has a really good reputation so since it's so low and I need a condenser mic for the nuances, I thought I should get it. Don't you agree? I'm sure it wont be more than $50 dollars with this guy and trust me it's def not shady.
     
  15. Codemonkey

    Codemonkey Well-Known Member

    I said:
     
  16. mannyr

    mannyr Active Member

    Ooh okay thanks!!

    Yeah I know the room might be bad but if its totally quiet and I use a noise gate won't it be manageable?
     
  17. Guitarfreak

    Guitarfreak Well-Known Member

    It is really recommended that you use a condenser in a sonically sound room. I have no firsthand experience with the noises that a condenser picks up, but I have heard things. Like being able to hear an airplane pass overhead, or the garbage truck outside, or the sound of the air conditioning vents kicking on. That's part of the reason I was also steering you away from making a bum decision.

    Just thought I'd put that in there since nobody is responding and I'm off to work soon.
     
  18. mannyr

    mannyr Active Member

    Thanks!

    But how well will a noise gate using Logic 8 work?
     
  19. Guitarfreak

    Guitarfreak Well-Known Member

    Noise gates only work under a certain threshold. Whenever there is a sound above the threshold it is as if you had no gate at all. So if the washing machine is going in the background, then when the singer sings a phrase the washing machine will be heard, and when the singer stops so does the machine. You can EQ the sound down a bit, but you are also affecting the voice as well. The only way to truly remove a sound from a recording is to not let it be recorded in the first place.
     
  20. Codemonkey

    Codemonkey Well-Known Member

    Noise gate, bah.
    Guitarfreak is on the money - gating is something used mostly in sparse amounts, or experimental music.

    Tom mics come to mind, but those mics are placed very well and mixed at low volumes.
     

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