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Rode NT5's and phantom power

Discussion in 'Pro Audio Equipment' started by the01habitat, Apr 4, 2007.

  1. the01habitat

    the01habitat Guest

    I got a pair of NT5's and the other day i muted the 2 channels i wanted to connect them to, then i connected them, and then i turned the phantom power on and what i got was a trip back to the retailer where i got them and they traded them out for a new pair. Only one mic worked and the other i had to turn the gain up insainly high and then all i got was noise and some of the cymbal i was trying to record. i think i blew trhe capsule out. I connected them in the correct order rite?
    1 mute channels
    2 connect mic
    3 turn on phantom power
    4 unmute channels
    5 bang on the drums all day
    rite or wrong?
    i read the manual and it led me to believe i did all correct except in the manual it says to turn the gain to full attenuation. that mean all the way up rite? i didnt do that. could that have blown my mics?
    can anyone tell me whats going on here?
     
  2. moonbaby

    moonbaby Mmmmmm Well-Known Member

    No, turning the gain pot all the way to the right will usually blow out...
    YOUR EARDRUMS! "Full attenuation" means pulling DOWN the gain all the way. You should start each channels gain setting at the minimum amount and then slowly bring it up to a good level, at least until you are familiar with your sources and the mixer they connect to.
    Anyway, I don't think that you hurt the mics. I have a pair of NT5s and think that they're a great tool to have. Mine have been through hell and back, and still have survived. Enjoy!
     
  3. dcj

    dcj Guest

    Moonbaby, I have a pair of NT5's also. I know that some people don't care for them, but I think they're great for what they are. I mainly use them as drum overheads. They do a good job at picking up the cymbal sizzle. In most cases I prefer them over my SM81's that cost twice as much.

    Are you sure that the problem you're having isn't with your phantom source? Though you may not want to experiment with other mic's just in case, you could take a multimeter and test the voltage outputs. Remember, that just because a mic doesn't work at all, it doesn't mean that the mic is faulty or that you've fried it with too much voltage. You may noy be getting any voltage at all. Other than that, I don't know what else to suggest. My NT5's have taken a lickin' and they keep on tickin'. Sorry about your bad experience with them.
     
  4. dcj

    dcj Guest

    Sorry, the last post was meant for the01habitat.
     
  5. the01habitat

    the01habitat Guest

    so let me get this straight, i should have the gain all the way down, mute the channels, connect the mics, turn the phantom power on, unmute the channels, and turn the gain up to the desired level?
    when taking the mics down should i shut the phantom power off before or after i unplug the mics so as i dont damage them?
    thanks for the advice in advance.
     
  6. Boswell

    Boswell Moderator Distinguished Member

    Yes.
    The NT5s themselves are robust and will take being plugged in and out of cables with PP present. It's the input circuits of the preamps that you need to treat with care, so what you are suggesting is safe practice.
     
  7. the01habitat

    the01habitat Guest

    thanks for clearing it up for me guys. heres a good one, after trying the replaced mics i came up with the same scenario, one mic wouldnt work so after testing everything but the mic cable it was connected to, it turned out to be that vary cable that was bad, lame. but get this, that cable is no good for condenser mics i guess, when i plug dynamic mics into it its fine, whats wrong here? i dont intend on keeping the cable but its one of 2 cables i made back in school and got an A in the class, what didnt the teacher catch? what did i do wrong to the cable? id guess i solidered the grond to the cold pin?
     
  8. Boswell

    Boswell Moderator Distinguished Member

    Most likely to be a short from pin 1 to pin 2 or from pin 1 to pin 3. Dynamic mics would appear to work OK, but the interference rejection would be low and if you had phantom power enabled, you would get 7mA d.c. flowing through the coil (not good).
     
  9. dcj

    dcj Guest

    Just a side note...... Habitat, I wouldn't work with any ribbon microphones for awhile if I was you.
     
  10. the01habitat

    the01habitat Guest

    There it is! Thats what I was waiting for, some kind of ill mannedred ridicule. Thank you so much dcj for that bit of information, Ill make sure not to use any ribbon mics any time soon and to put a end to learning anything about microphones and recording, but just because I believe you wanted to spout some knoledge, why dont you tell me, and the rest of the people paying attention to this post, why I shouldn't use any ribbon mics any time soon? Perhaps its got something to do with sending 48v to a ribbon mic? Break it down brotha D!
     
  11. dcj

    dcj Guest

    Habatit, I really didn't intend my statement to be some kind of ill mannedred ridicule. Just wanted to save you from frying any ribbons before you get your problem worked out. You obviously already knew what I meant by saying that it had something to do with sending 48v to a ribbon mic. So, you already had the knoledge!
     

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