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SOUND ENGINEERING SCHOOLS: Middle Tennesee State Univ.

Discussion in 'Recording' started by CoryX, Aug 11, 2006.

  1. CoryX

    CoryX Guest

    i was really looking into Full Sail, but i keep hearing bad reveiws about it. My dad really wants me to go to MTSU because they supposably have an amazing audio production 4 year program deal.

    What do yall think?
  2. sheet

    sheet Well-Known Member

    May 28, 2003
    Kansas City, KS
    Home Page:
    MTSU is a very good school. I would take it over Full Sail. It would be cheaper for you to live in TN as well. There are too many people going to these schools that come out with crap for skills and knowledge. That's the only thing bad about them. It is the students, not necessarilly the schools. You can learn what you WANT to learn. Being in TN, you are more likely to run into people with more experience and know how to make a record.

    Edited: Corrected hoe, meant how.
  3. McLaughlin

    McLaughlin Active Member

    Aug 7, 2006
    The Institute of Production And Recording

    It was started and is run by world renowned Audio Engineers. Students can book 1 of 8 studios 24/7 (Full Sail doesnt offer any individual Studio time). Practically every teacher (and ever Engineering teach) has atleast a gold record to their name.

    Its the place to be.

    Also, Full Sail is more concerned with making money and getting as many people through the building in a 24 hour period as possible (4am classes...)
  4. MadMax

    MadMax Distinguished Member

    Mar 18, 2001
    Sunny & warm NC
    Home Page:
    Good friend of mine's on faculty there.

    I know several grads... good skillsets.

    I'd recommend it!

  5. Nirvalica

    Nirvalica Guest

    i want to go to school for music engineering and MTSU is one of the places i want to go. i lived in a suburb of nashville for about 2 years, and i loved the area. lots of music stuff everywhere there. i don't know much about the school itself, but the nashville area is excellent for people into music and especially live sound (mostly because there are lots of bands, and that means lots of PA systems and soundmen needed) and recording (music row...).
  6. Dan_Pence

    Dan_Pence Guest

    I'm a Full Sail grad. I actually grew up in Franklin, TN - 45 minutes from MTSU. When I was looking into recording schools, I considered MTSU. The only reason I chose Full Sail was due to the fact that I could focus hardcore on audio for a year, be done with, and get out into the industry.

    What's most important is how determined you are to succeed. If you're hardcore about learning and are absolutely sure you want to do audio - I would recommend Full Sail. If you aren't quite sure, or if you really would like to have a 'real' degree to go along with your audio education - I'd suggest taking the time to go to MTSU. MTSU has an EXCELLENT program for a state school, I must say. They aren't quite as cutting edge as Full Sail, but what's most important is learning the principles and concepts of audio, not necessarily every knob and button on the latest console.

    I'm currently finishing my B.B.A. at MTSU. Feel free to PM me if you need any help, advise, or if I could help you set up a meeting at MTSU or anything.

    They are both great schools - you're going to run into stupid people at both, trust me. The majority of people who go to recording schools are morons who don't know what they want to do with their lives or think it'd be "cool" to work in the audio industry. If you're serious, you'll soar past these losers and stick out those who might be in a position to give you a gig :).

    I hope this helps...
  7. Nirvalica

    Nirvalica Guest

    i lived in Brentwood for a few years, but now im in nj. i really liked the brentwood and nashville area.
  8. natural

    natural Active Member

    Jul 21, 2006
    Take the 4 years,
    The old saying-' We Learn From Our Mistakes' is true.
    You need to make at least about 4 years of mistakes. You might as well do it at school where you can learn from your mistakes, as opposed to going to a 1 yr school and making 3 years of mistakes in front of employers.
    You need time to:
    - develop the skills
    - learn how to not piss off the clients by pissing off many clients. (in this case, other students)
    - Fry a tweeter or two
    - Loose all your audio files and learn the lesson of archiving
    - balance your ck book
    - Loose all your clients audio files, because you didn't really learn the lesson the first time around
    - See how your peers develop over the years and steal their idea's.
    - loose another clients audio files, and swear that this time you've learned your lesson.
    Yep, 4 years sounds just about right. (some people need 5)
  9. JensenBohren

    JensenBohren Guest

    1. I'm a Full Sail Graduate.
    2. I enjoyed my experience, as I love audio and find it fascinating.
    3. I'm currently broke, no studio will hire me because Full Sail has lowered its threshold for passing tests and let too many graduates who don't really know or care what they're doing go into the workforce, and the Placement department doesn't know anyone within 250 miles of where I chose to settle--though they claimed they had contacts 'everywhere.'

    Don't get me wrong, if you have contacts in the industry and about 80K to burn, Full Sail ahead. If you're getting loans to go, and eating Ramen Noodles with the occasional cheese 80% of the meals you eat just to go there... well, you might consider alternative places. Not to say the information is bad-- it isn't. However, it is a LOT of information in a SHORT period of time, very little practical application for all the concepts involved, and skates on the edge between half-truths and lies upon occasion with some of its braggings.

    Also, if you decide to go back to college, not a single class from Full Sail will transfer to your next college-- most teachers don't have the degrees required for a class to translate, even though they know the subject like the back of their hand.

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