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Stereo or Mono signal for Vocals?

Discussion in 'Vocals' started by ORSUP, Sep 24, 2007.

  1. ORSUP

    ORSUP Guest

    I have been debating about this with myself for a bit and decided to ask the crew here what your opinions are.
    This is the path I use for recording VOCALS.

    After my mic I currently use a tube pre-amp to a Digitech Studio 4 (for a bit of compression) then send a stereo signal out to my DAW. I have found that the stereo signal is much nicer and fuller when I send the signal to the DAW stereo. So I use a STEREO vocal track to work with.
    Does any one have preferences or is this out of the norm? I would really appreciate some feedback.
  2. Boswell

    Boswell Distinguished Moderator Resource Member

    Apr 19, 2006
    Home Page:
    If you prefer the sound of the stereo vocal track, go with it. You are presumably mixing down to a 2-track CD with the vocals nominally centred anyway, so it makes little difference to subsequent processing.
  3. TVPostSound

    TVPostSound Guest

    From your description, you are not stereo!!
    Its a double mono.
  4. Cucco

    Cucco Distinguished Member

    Mar 8, 2004
    Fredericksburg, VA
    Here's a good way to see if you're actually stereo or not (and my guess is you're not...you're probably dual mono as TVPS states).

    Take your stereo track and reverse the phase on only one side of the stereo track. If the sound goes away...double mono. If the sound changes but doesn't completely disappear...you're stereo. The latter is very unlikely (unless you're feeding it out of a reverb box too).

    Cheers -

  5. ORSUP

    ORSUP Guest

    Both good points. I will try that.
  6. BobRogers

    BobRogers Distinguished Member

    Apr 4, 2006
    Blacksburg, VA
    If it turns out you are in dual mono, so you are in a situation that shouldn't sound different, but does...the answer usually turns out to be that one setting is slightly louder than the other for some odd reason. Easiest way to fool yourself on A/B comparisons is not to match the volumes exactly (and darn tough to do right).

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