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Studio and production techniques

Discussion in 'Recording' started by kilkus, Jan 3, 2006.

  1. kilkus

    kilkus Guest

    Hello. I'm currently at a music college here in London and I have been given a task of writing a one page essay on studio and production techniques, but as I have no knowledge of how a studio works or it's techniques, I have no idea where to start!

    Here is the question I have been given:

    'Compose a short essay on the basic functions of a recording studio, and identify the key personnel and their roles and responsibilities.'

    It doesn't have to be long, just one page, and I was wondering if anyone could give me any information on this subject, or any good websites which will help me with the answer. It has to be in by Friday and I was given it today so I don't have a lot of time, but any help what so ever will be greatly appreciated!

    I know this is a synth forum, but I remember from a previous question I asked that you were all very friendly on here, so I thought i'd give it a go at asking on here again!

    Thank you very much!

    Kind regards,
    -Alex.
     
  2. RemyRAD

    RemyRAD Guest

    Well Alex, the key personnel in the studio. Of course the producer who provides most of the conceptual music and style oriented suggestions and overall quality control of the music and performers. The A1 engineer who basically is technically in charge of how things are miced and set up along with recording and mixing. The A2 assistant engineer who are the extended hands of the A1 and generally the overall "gopher" (go for). He puts the microphones where the A1 wants them and also " tweaks" them as the A1 fine tunes the sound. The producer is also quite frequently at the " Mastering" session where the mixed recording is transferred for replication purposes. The A2 may also be called upon to do "overdubs" at other times, which is the process of adding to or, correcting previous multi-track performances, already recorded and/or in addition to but not always. The A2 also frequently keeps track of all of the track sheets and other technical information for the A1 and producer and is usually in charge of getting coffee, getting soft drinks, getting lunch, getting the hell out and getting the studio clean.

    Now of course the other key personnel in the studio is the owner of the Company, the accountant, the bookkeeper and your public relations/advertising person. Not to mention your chief engineer and his other staff, who is frequently in charge of equipment/technical maintenance and/or design and installation, upgrades, modifications, etc..

    As far as subject matter is concerned, I really think you "Picked a dilly"!

    An idiot American who turned down a maintenance position from Sir George Martin 25 years ago! I'll never stop kicking myself in the ass for that one!

    Remy Ann David
     
  3. alimoniack

    alimoniack Guest

    It might be worth noting that the personell in a recording studio can range from the large network mentioned above to one guy on his own. In a large commercial studio the type of setup remy mentions is typical but producers are sometimes brought in by the clients themselves, (the only people missing from the list) rather than being employed by the studio. A lot of pro producers are freelance or run a studio themselves. Also, I've never ever seen an assistant engineer being forced to get lunch for other people, that's really harsh!

    The function can also vary widely from recording demos for metal bands on a small set up, recording music for tv/film/radio etc with very few live instruments, to recording commercially released albums by established artists on analog tape with the very best equipment.

    I'd say your remit is impossible, one page can never cover the scope of such a question since the function is almost infinitely varied, as are the different personell structures...

    You could try a few typical examples but make the point about diversity...it would still be hard to get on one page.

    The best of luck!
     

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