Thinking about reverbs now...hardware that is. Soliciting advice please.

Discussion in 'Tracking / Mixing / Editing' started by sshack, Feb 5, 2010.

  1. sshack

    sshack Active Member

    So, I've been using ITB verbs for a while now and haven't been unhappy, but I decided to hook up my old LXP-1 for grins and giggles the other day and thought the difference was pretty drastic. Naturally, it got me thinking about purchasing a good 'all around' reverb unit so I thought I would come and ask you guys for some advice and/or direction.

    My budget could be as much as $1000, but I'd prefer to keep it under $700. Delays would be nice too, but it's not a deal breaker.

    Most of the applications would probably be around vocals (lead and BGVs) and acoustic guitars. In the meantime, I'm going to keep playing with and using the LXP-1 as it doesn't suck.

    Thanks in advanced.
     
  2. hueseph

    hueseph Well-Known Member

    Don't suppose there's a working used Lexicon M480L laying around somewhere? I don't know anymore. I can't keep up. Too much gear. Too little money.
     
  3. CoyoteTrax

    CoyoteTrax Well-Known Member

    With that kind of budget it's hard not to say PCM 90 or 70
     
  4. Kev

    Kev Well-Known Member

    ALEX
    like the LXP-1
    another of the cheaper reverbs that punch above their weight
     
  5. AudioGaff

    AudioGaff Well-Known Member

    Use the search function. Topic has been discussed many times and even again recently. Go the extra mile, save and spend what it takes to get great reverb rather than try fit a reverb in to a low budget.
     
  6. BusterMudd

    BusterMudd Active Member

    If used PCM-90's are going for <$1k, I'm shopping in the wrong department stores.
     
  7. CoyoteTrax

    CoyoteTrax Well-Known Member

    You're shopping in the wrong dept stores my man. Bidding on ebay usually sees 'em go for $700 but plenty of buy it now ads on the bay let 'em go for $800-900.
     
  8. TopherNeverDies

    TopherNeverDies Active Member

    Bustermud,

    Now is a good time to buy used gear, that's for sure. I just purchased a PCM91 for 699 used. Best part was when it came in it was still in original package with the manual and everything. In fact it looked like it had never been touched minus two small marks from rack screws. I made have lucked out with that one but there's other gems to find. Guitarcenter.com has a used section and you can check all of their store's used stock. I've been checking every now and then and it has paid off. The studio I work for got a great deal on a 737sp.
     
  9. AudioGaff

    AudioGaff Well-Known Member

    Picked myself up a Mint PCM91 several weeks back for $700 on craigslist from a desperate tearful soul. I was going to flip it and make a few bucks as I don't need it, but I think I may just keep it as a thrasher in my live effects rack.

    I wasn't thinking forward enough when I bought mine that now that Lexicon sells the PCM series reverbs in plug-format, that the 90/91 hardware versions were bound to drop to insane prices compared to just a few years ago.
     
  10. audiokid

    audiokid Staff

    AG, do PCM series reverb plugins sound as good as the hardware?
     
  11. RemyRAD

    RemyRAD Guest

    A really good hardware electronic reverb should have some randomness built into it. The best ones have it. The cheaper ones don't. Case in point. I have 2 Lexicon LXP 1's. In a peculiar situation I thought I would get a better, denser reverb if I used one for each channel of a stereo pair. This turned out not to be the case. Since these are mono in & stereo out, I thought the density of having both channels summed would provide me with a better reverb. It didn't. What I got was solid mono. This turned out this way because these lesser expensive reverbs have no randomness in their algorithms. It's strictly a mathematical equation and when both are set the same, there is no difference between the two outputs. This really blew my mind. In that respect, I should've taken the stereo output from each having adjusted the 2 with slightly different settings on each, running them in parallel. But I just got lazy and utilized a single unit instead.

    I don't have my QUANTEC room simulator anymore. Just a bunch of cheap units.
    Mx. Remy Ann David
     
  12. AudioGaff

    AudioGaff Well-Known Member

    Ya, they do. The plugs are 99% the same as the newer PCM92 hadware unit (based on the PCM91) and the plugs have some tweaks and bug fixes that are yet to be updated in the PCM92 hardware. Lex got it right and they are not the CPU hogs that you might expect them to be. I won't be selling my old school Lex M300 anytime soon as I still like and prefer that box for some things, but those two reverbs and my two Eventide's, TC M5000 and TC PowerCore (verbs from M5000 & M6000) should get me by for for most projects. And it's nice to know that for some projects I won't need to use any of those other half-ass wannabe reverb plugs but still not need to rely on external hardware reverb like I did in the past.
     
  13. Link555

    Link555 Well-Known Member

    Make that 2 votes for the Lexicon ALEX. Something about it, sounds like a memory....
     
  14. lambchop

    lambchop Active Member

    Too bad! You just missed a chance of getting an AKG BX10 spring reverb off of evilbay for $1,225.00. We had one of those in our recording studio back in the 1970's. What a sweet sounding reverb that was.

    AKG BX 10 Vintage Studio Spring Reverb on eBay.ca (item 170453874721 end time 09-Mar-10 23:28:48 EST)
     
  15. kmetal

    kmetal Kyle P. Gushue Well-Known Member

    Not sure if your looking for studio or live, but ever considered a high end (processor hungry) reverb pluggin? You gain the advantage of multiple "instances". From what i've read of the pro's, lexicon (hardware) seems to be a prevalent reverb in their mixes. "Behind The Glass" by Howard Massey, mentions quite a bit of gear.
     
  16. RemyRAD

    RemyRAD Guest

    Anyone interested in an AKG BX 20? I've had this since the late 1970s, I worked for the original owner of this unit. I used this extensively in the late 1970s, early 1980s. It's still quite sweet and dense sounding. Not at all like an EMT 140 and certainly a lot smaller.

    Let me know? Remy@RemyDavid.com Make me an offer I can't refuse.

    Dancing with reverbs
    Mx. Remy Ann David
     
  17. audiokid

    audiokid Staff

    Akg bx 20

    :tongue:
    wow Remy, what a gem that is. Are they difficult to ship? How much does it weigh? Do you have any pics? I'm going to google it now and try and show the crowd one.
    I would love to have this. hmm, just too far away.
     
  18. audiokid

    audiokid Staff

    Remy, what's the difference between the e?
    A beauty for my acoustic music. Please tell us more about this reverb, who's voice or songs have been through it etc. Remy, we need to get you on the front page sometime. You are always surprising me.

    Here's a pic.

    imgfd6adf6azik1z&#106.jpg
     
  19. RemyRAD

    RemyRAD Guest

    Yup, that's the one. It is the BX20E version. Not sure what the difference was prior to the E version? I don't have the reverb time remote control. But that is just a couple of potentiometers and no additional circuitry. Easy to build one up since I have the schematics/manual. I had been using it at the home studio which I am in the process of dismantling. It's actually quite amazing how this thing works. For those that are not familiar with it, it was the only good sounding spring reverb ever made. Sure, there were plenty of others but nothing like this. Each spring is 3 m long. That's more than 9 feet per spring. The spring is folded over twice with both transducing emitters & receivers at both ends. The signal was fed into both ends of the spring and the signal was received from both ends of the spring. The direct single is nulled out electronically. I guess this is what they referred to as their TTL or " Torsional Transmission Line". The reverb time is controlled electronically and not mechanically as in an EMT. Yeah, not an easy item to ship to say the least. But I am interested in lightening my load. Although it has handles on it it should not be thought of as a portable unit. In fact AKG does not recommend moving it around a whole lot as it is rather fragile. Another reason why I have not installed it in the truck. Back in October I heard Allen Sides demonstrating his $32,000 speaker system. He was playing some of his recordings from the late 1970s. As I was listening, I thought it sounded marvelous and asked him if it was an EMT. He told me it wasn't, "it was a BX 20E". Make no mistake, it does not sound like a plate. No real sizzle. Just beautiful smooth reverb. Yeah, great on acoustic stuff.

    Taking offers
    Mx. Remy Ann David
     
  20. planet10

    planet10 Active Member

    hardware units all the way!!
    tc electronics m2000, m3000
     

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