those in the know, if you could lend an ear

Discussion in 'Mastering' started by maxwelllewis, Aug 5, 2006.

  1. maxwelllewis

    maxwelllewis Guest

    i mix with some bass-heavy (but flat-eq-ed via stereo) speakers, and when i listen to my stuff in a car stereo the highs are too high... i think my most basic problem is simply that i need some good studio monitors, but another question...

    would a wiser way of bypassing this bass-heavy-ness of my speakers just to eq all the tracks (in SONAR, btw, that's what i use) in the master panel so that it resembles a more "generic" stereo?

    anyway, here's the stuff i'm talking about (it sounds great on my speakers, and of course headphones):

    http://www.minusthemasses.com/mp3s/the escape.mp3

    also, since i am entirely self-taught and all that common stuff as that probably is these days, any general comments or tips or criticisms on the levels, eqing, mastering in general would be much appreciated. i'm obviously ambitious, and want to learn as much as possible... i am compulsive in my musical creation and will probably persue it as a job someday (i'm 21, almost undecided about the future, blah blah).

    thanks for all and any commentary!
     
  2. Michael Fossenkemper

    Michael Fossenkemper Distinguished past mastering moderator Well-Known Member

    Yes it does sound like a monitoring issue. It's a global to little weight on the track. The problem with just slapping some eq on the track in this environment, is that you are kind of shooting in the dark hit or miss kind of thing. I think some better time and money spent would be to go look for some better monitors. If that's not possible, then make friends with someone that has some better monitors so you can go over there and tweek the mix. You could also play around with the placement of the monitors too. If they are close to a wall or in the corners, it's going to enhance the low end coming out of them. move them away. It's always best to try and get the mix right from the start. So if you can fix this problem in your room, then you won't be second guessing the problems when you mix.
     
  3. maxwelllewis

    maxwelllewis Guest

    really? closer to walls increases low end? huh, should have thought of that, yes i understand the frequency dynamics ... i never think about those things. i'm sure other dynamics of my little room may effect things as well... hmm...

    thanks for the tip. what's this global comment, i don't know what that means.
     
  4. Michael Fossenkemper

    Michael Fossenkemper Distinguished past mastering moderator Well-Known Member

    Global in that the lack of body seems to be across the board (everything seems to be lacking it)
     
  5. maxwelllewis

    maxwelllewis Guest

    body? seriously, i'm entirely self taught and apparently unread as well.
     
  6. Michael Fossenkemper

    Michael Fossenkemper Distinguished past mastering moderator Well-Known Member

    What I mean by body, is that the sounds lack weight (low end, body). Everything seems well balanced level wise. The sounds aren't bad, it just needs to move a little more in the lowend. Which is why you think it sounds bright everywhere else. Experiment with placement of the monitors. move them around the room. play something other than your mixes and see where the monitors sound the best and try to find a way to work around that position. how big is your room?
     
  7. maxwelllewis

    maxwelllewis Guest

    it's like 12 x 12. very small. i'm moving out and into a car and to the east coast in about three weeks though.
     

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