TLM-170

Discussion in 'Location Recording' started by John Stafford, Mar 28, 2005.

  1. John Stafford

    John Stafford Well-Known Member

    Does anybody here use this?

    I'm sort of intrigued by it. I know it's supposed to have a very transparent sound, so I'm wondering how a pair would work as mains, piano or general duties.

    I haven't seen it used very often for musical applications, although I've often seen it used for voiceover work -often coupled with a U87.

    In this part of the world, a second-hand TLM-170 original version costs about 65% of the price of a second-hand U87 although they are the same price new.

    Thanks
    John
     
  2. FifthCircle

    FifthCircle Well-Known Member

    I've used them a bunch... When they work, they are great... However, they can be one of those "picky" mics to use. Sometimes they sound a bit "limp" as compared to other mics out there, but on some instruments that can be a good thing. For brass they work well, for choirs, they can sound good. The multiple patterns are certainly a help. When close micing strings, they can also do well, but I wouldn't use them as a main orchestral or string quartet pickup.

    --Ben
     
  3. John Stafford

    John Stafford Well-Known Member

    Ben
    Thank you for the info. They're probably not the mic I'm looking for. Like the U89, I've rarely heard anyone get passionate about these mics. The attraction for me is that they're so cheap second hand, and they have lots of patterns. I suppose I should keep looking, as I'm still not 100% sure of what I want from a multi-pattern mic.

    Your opinion is greatly appreciated.
    John
     
  4. Cucco

    Cucco Distinguished Member

    Hey John,

    I'm not sure what happened, but I put up a reply and now I see it's not here. :evil:

    My thought on the TLM170 is that it's one of the better "new" mics Neumann has introduced in a while (definitely embarasses the TLM103). A mic that, instead of trying to "emulate" finer mics of previous days simply produces it's own and distinct sound. I can see where ben is coming from suggesting that it might sound "limp" on some sources - I would never use it on a Dvorak wind section for example. But for piano and chorus, it's a downright good mic.

    My thoughts though - for the money - the MG M930 - impossible to beat for anywhere near the price.

    J.
     
  5. John Stafford

    John Stafford Well-Known Member

    Thanks Jeremy
    There is something up, as the little orange thingy didn't show up even when you posted this time.

    The MG930 is tempting, although over here I think the M296 is very near it in price. That's SERIOUSLY tempting! The problem is though, that they hold their value, and I can't really afford a pair new. The TLM170i doesn't hold its value (although I think it's the same as the newer version apart from the remote control).

    There are great bargains to be had with the MKHs, but they hardy ever show up on the market (other than the shotguns). It's a strange marketplace, as I've seen current Schoeps models go for more second-hand than new! Maybe that's because people are looking in the wrong place for their prices on new models (or maybe I deal with gangsters :twisted: ).

    It's just so hard to choose, but the one thing in the 170's favour is that it's multipattern.

    Oh decisions, decisions.....how exquisitely agonising :wink:

    John
     
  6. Zilla

    Zilla Active Member

    I second Ben's opinion, and his use of "limp" as an adjective is right on the mark. There are just so many other multi-pattern mics out there that are more usefull and, well... less limp.
     
  7. John Stafford

    John Stafford Well-Known Member

    Hi Zilla
    Which one's would you consider?

    BTW I've heard that Sonodore do mods on the 170 that are supposedly stunning, but that probably costs more than the mic itself!

    John
     
  8. Sonarerec

    Sonarerec Guest

    When you say that they are cheap, exactly what does that mean in Euros or USD?

    Rich
     
  9. John Stafford

    John Stafford Well-Known Member

    Hi Rich
    They can be had for less than 800 euro. I don't know if that's good by American standards, but I've never come across a decent U87 for much less than e1500. I don't know if that seems cheap to you, but pricing structures for new mics are very different over here.

    I'd like to try the older 170 without the newer circuit boards and compare it to the current model.

    John
     
  10. Sonarerec

    Sonarerec Guest

    John,

    I cannot PM you so please contact me via the email link found on my website.

    Rich
     
  11. John Stafford

    John Stafford Well-Known Member

    Hi Rich
    I sent you an e-mail and it bounced back for some reason. Maybe you could try and e-mail me and see if it gets through. I have an MSN account so it's not always the most reliable.

    I don't want to put my e-mail address on a forum due to the spam risk. The first four letters are john followed by staf without any spaces in between, and I'm at msn.com.

    Looking forward to hearing from you!
    John
     
  12. Plush

    Plush Guest

    We totally endorse the TLM-170 and the U-89 as examples of flat sounding mics. They are particularly good on choir because they minimize siblilant sound and not together "Sssss. . ." sounds in the ensemble. Also wonderful on wood wind and strings.

    The two mics use the same capsule, but different electronics.

    800 Euro is a good price for these by any standards. In the US, if you can find them for $1200.00 or less, you are getting a great mic for great money.

    Just forget the arguments that some make that they sound limp or otherwise flaccid. If you need assistance in a "personal" of "private" part of your life , there are other alternatives much different than a microphone.
     
  13. Sonarerec

    Sonarerec Guest

    Hudson,

    I have used my 193s (same cap) as mains for woodwinds and would also choose them for choral if my SF12 would not do (such as with an orchestra) but I am curious if you would use them for mains for situations other than these?

    It also occurs to me that they could be nice on a brass quintet...or stg qt for less "slash and burn"....

    Rich
     
  14. Sonarerec

    Sonarerec Guest

    Hudson,

    I have used my 193s (same cap) as mains for woodwinds and would also choose them for choral if my SF12 would not do (such as with an orchestra) but I am curious if you would use them for mains for situations other than these?

    It also occurs to me that they could be nice on a brass quintet...or stg qt for less "slash and burn"....

    Rich
     

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