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U87 shock mounts - any decent "generics"?

Discussion in 'Pro Audio Equipment' started by hollywood_steve, Jun 20, 2001.

  1. hollywood_steve

    hollywood_steve Active Member

    Jan 3, 2001
    Totally willing to admit to being a cheap S.O.B. I'm purchasing an 87 next week and the mic does not come with any mount. The Neumann EA87 elastic mount seems really nice, but its also $75 more than an RNC stereo compressor! If there is no decent alternative, I'll shut up and write Neumann a check. But I was just wondering if anyone has found any other shock mounts that perform very well with the 87? I still haven't decided if I like the $70 Audio Technica mount that Royer supplies with the R121; but that's the sort of thing I'm looking for. Is there a good mid-priced mount that won't leave me wishing I had bought the EA87? (for what its worth, the AT mount does a fine job supporting and isolating my Royer, it just hangs a little bit crooked, at that can drive you nuts after a while.)

  2. UTS

    UTS Guest

    Hi Steve,

    Rode are selling shock mounts that fit to a Neumann U87. They are good quality and sell for approximately the same as the AT.


  3. MPlancke

    MPlancke Guest

    Originally posted by hollywood_steve:
    I'm purchasing an 87 next week and the mic does not come with any mount.

    If it's a original U87 you won't have much of a choice anyway. To my knowledge Neumann doesn't offer a shock mount that fits the U87, only the U87a models.

    I picked up a cheap shock mount from one of those Chinese U87 clones for $30 and use that on my original U87. It was a tight fit so I just leave the mic in the shock mount. It works okay, but I have noticed the mechanism for adjusting the position of the shock mount is pretty flimsy.
  4. RandomGuest

    RandomGuest Guest

    Feb 10, 2001
    I think 'Stedman' makes one that will fit a U87 as well...or...you can get the regular 'stand mount' and some 4" thick blocks of foam rubber...cut out notches in the foam for the legs of the mic stand [don't go all the way through]...the 'shock mounting occurs' when the stand stands on the foam rubber (so you want it fairly dense, like a sofa cushion kind of density)...isolating it from the floor...otherwise known as a shockmount].

    Total cost...about $10/slab.
  5. hollywood_steve

    hollywood_steve Active Member

    Jan 3, 2001
    Thanks for the replies. Two comments:
    1. it is a newer U87ai, not an old U87, so the Neumann mount WILL work.
    2. the Rode website can be a PITA; it looks nice, but its not "user friendly," and I can't find any info about their mounts. Does the mount that fits an 87 belong to a specifc Rode mic? That way, I could look up that Rode mic and maybe find info about the mount that way. Thanks.
  6. drumsound

    drumsound Active Member

    Feb 12, 2001
    Bloomington, IL
    Check out http://www.shockmount.com. I've got one and I think I'm going to get more. They are very simple home made devices that work well.
  7. Geoff Wood

    Geoff Wood Guest

    Rode shockmount that fits a U87 is an SM-1. Yes the website is very pretty, but I couldn't find this info there either ...

  8. dbock

    dbock Guest

    The Soundelux spider mount will fit a U87, 1/4" welded steel (won't break) makes the chinese mounts (which break) look like toys. About $200 street price.
  9. Tom Cram

    Tom Cram Active Member

    Mar 5, 2001
    salt lake city, utah
    Home Page:
    I checked out those shockmounts on the http://www.shockmount.com page. Is anyone else concerned about the tube shape affecting frequency response? Its basically a port living in the rear of the polar pattern.

    I'd go with a spider mount.
  10. Tom Cram

    Tom Cram Active Member

    Mar 5, 2001
    salt lake city, utah
    Home Page:
    I just did the math, and if my calculations are correct (my math is rusty) a 3" tube (approx size of shockmount) will affect 2.25kHz. This is smack dab in the middle of the audible range.

    Somebody check my math please. Here is the formula;

    Half wave @ 3"
    Full wave @ 6"
    Speed of sound in air is 344 m/sec

    freq = speed/wavelength

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