Vocal effects

Discussion in 'Tracking / Mixing / Editing' started by Paul007, Feb 7, 2012.

  1. Paul007

    Paul007 Guest

    Hello,
    do you estimate which effects are used in this sample in time 0:00 - 0:05 and 0:11 - 0:14? Thank you.

    http://www.djpmc.cz/mp3/LE_MIX_DE_PMC_-_DISCOCLUB_KUVAJT_20.01.2012.mp3


    Paul
     
  2. RemyRAD

    RemyRAD Well-Known Member

    This is typical pop rock radio production. What you are listening to could be Adobe Audition, Steinberg anything, ProTools.

    He was using a multitude of effects processing throughout that clip. Much of that was flanged with artificial short reverb i.e. an ambient generator effect. The flanging was creating low-frequency oscillated pitch shifting with the flanging (in stereo I might add) along with some minor length delays of a few milliseconds. Cool sounding isn't it? And you are most definitely listening to a condenser microphone which one can ascertain from the audible sibilance. There was also an awesome amount of compression and limiting that was utilized within that production along with whatever was just in front of the FM transmitter which was more compression & limiting along with high-frequency limiting and it was still UBER cool sounding. So it was not one effect but a series of layered and multiple effects. There is no single button preset that will give you all of that with a single selection. This is something that has to be built from experience. This is also not a single performance but a composite. And that's why this guy gets paid the big bucks at the radio station.

    Start experimenting you German guys are quite adept at that. So put your best Heil forward.
    Mx. Remy Ann David
     
  3. Unregistered

    Unregistered Guest

    Hello,
    Thank you very much for your answer. Could you please recommend me effects (e.g. from Waves) for starting processing vocal record? I'd like to get this result.

    Paul
     
  4. RemyRAD

    RemyRAD Well-Known Member

    I don't work much with the big Waves special effects packages so I really can't make any recommendation in the use of those. Other than, what I've already described to you as effects and how they were obtained is a generic description of what was utilized to describe what effects were used. So if some of your Waves effects featured those particular effects, you will need to utilize a certain amount of layering of those to obtain those variety of different effects utilized. It was no single effect and Waves Effects Packages will have to be called on for numerous effects. No different if you were to utilize your resident multitracked software effects package that are already in your multitracked software program. Combination of both those and Waves may be the best way to get what you want? Or, you may do just fine with just sticking with what Waves has to offer? There is no way I can tell you what to use only what was used. You will have to tweak by ear to obtain what you want.

    It might be interesting to also realize that just creating those effects may also not create the sonic excitement that is also added by the radio stations dynamic range processing devices just prior to the input of the transmitter. That's mostly multiband limiting with additional higher frequency limiter also thrown on that. And you don't necessarily want to put that effect on each track individually but on the stereo composite mix. So you'll be adding plenty of compression, EQ, limiting along with your effects. You'll then create your mix in stereo. Then you'll add additional multiband limiting to the completed mix to try and re-create that dense, highly processed value of excitement to the sound. Again, it's not necessary to utilize multiband limiting on each individual track while mixing. It may though, be necessary to utilize broadband limiting on each of those recorded tracks? The final pass of the stereo mix through the multiband will create more of that highly processed FM like sound.

    There is always more than one way to do everything
    Mx. Remy Ann David
     

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