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Voiceovers – Most commonly used mic/gear?

Discussion in 'Recording' started by Jimmy, Jan 9, 2004.

  1. Jimmy

    Jimmy Guest

    For broadcast radio/television voiceovers, what is the most widely used microphone(s)…

    Also what is the de facto recording chain (pre/mic/comp/eq >> tape/hard drive, etc) – specifically, what pieces of gear/hardware/software….

    Thanks –

  2. AudioGaff

    AudioGaff Distinguished Member

    Feb 23, 2001
    Silicon Valley
    For voiceover mics in broadcast, the most popular tends to be the EV RE20, Shure SM7, and Sennhieser U421 but anything goes these days.

    The same thing for processing chains. Anything goes. The defacto standard in broadcasting for many years was the Focusrite Red-7 and still to this day, very strong sales is the reason the unit is still being made. I know it is one of my favorites in all vocal applications as well as guitar, kick and snare.

    Call a few places and ask the audio engineer what they are using...
  3. Jimmy

    Jimmy Guest

    Thanks AudioGaff --
  4. ozraves

    ozraves Active Member

    Feb 25, 2002
    oklahoma city
    Home Page:
    The Neumann U87 certainly gets used.

    The Blue Mouse and Audio-Technica AT4047 show up. Both are U47 fet influenced mics.

    I have a friend who produces storytellers. He likes the Blue Baby Bottle.

    I like the EV RE20.
  5. David French

    David French Distinguished Member

    Jun 19, 2002
    Another vote for the RE20. I've done a couple of voiceovers, and this mic was a joy to use on both of them.
  6. djmac

    djmac Guest

    I used to work in radio and do some voice over stuff @ my studio as well. When i was in radio i used a EV RE20, with a DBX 220 compressor. Now i use an AKG 3000, which seems to work out great and i have the old faithful 220. But to give it that "ballsy" sound you have to use a good compressor. And if you have a computer to edit it on run a vocal compressor in it as well. Just my opinion though.
  7. djmac

    djmac Guest

    Oh gear. The chain is like this ... Mic>Board for EQ>then compressor>HD24 ADAT>Computer using Cool Edit Pro 2.0 for my voice work for the fact that you can take out breaths and it has a great vocal compressor on it as well. For the radio stations i worked for we all used CEP for the precision and ease of multi-track use on commercials.
  8. SME

    SME Guest

    Most post studios use the defacto 416, most talent like the U87. A great U87 alternative (less expensive), is the TLM103.
    Pres are the Focurite Red, or the Presonus.

    I, recently, have used the Rode NT1A, plugged into a Mackie 1202VLZ for Travel Channel show narration into my Protools rig.2 of the VO guys are big time LA talent, and heard no complaints.

    Bottom line, its the engineers, and VO artist's talent that make it work!!!!
  9. It depends on the talent.
    Really good VO people with good voice and breath control can get away with a U47 or u87 or a modern alternative such as the Soundelux E47.
    A top line vocal channel makes it sound god-like, such as the Pendulum Quartet.
    Less experienced talent sound better on the dynamics, RE20, SM7, SM5, Senn 421.
    A great budget vocal channel is the Symetrix 528E.
    Any good quiet pre run into your DAW also works well.
    Remember, we're talking human voice here, not a symphony orchestra.
    I run CoolEdit Pro 2 (now Audition) and use the software compressor for my home voiceover studio in a custom curve.
    Some of my clients like the RE20 sound best, others like the sound of my RCA 77dx.
  10. Davedog

    Davedog Distinguished Member

    Dec 10, 2001
    Pacific NW
    Now how many times have I told you yahoos that the Symetrix 528 is a great budget pre/strip.!!
  11. Jimmy

    Jimmy Guest

    Thanks guys for all of the great input…

    The reason I ask, is that I’m doing some voice work and using a pretty good large diaphragm mic (CAD E-350). Since it might not be the perfect mic, I thought I’d try Antares mic modeler (said sheepishly at the risk of getting flogged in here).

    Set up properly, the U87 gold (Antares modeled version) actually sounds very good, maybe even great. The sound is not so extraordinarily far from that of the E-350, but it does add a little extra sumthin’, sumthin’…

    What I’m most surprised with though is that there is no modeled version of the RE20! Please someone correct me if I am wrong, but I’ve searched far and wide (Antares site/updates etc) and can’t find a version of it…

    Perhaps dedicated voiceover mics are not what they’re shooting for… Humm.

    Thanks again –

  12. StevenGurg

    StevenGurg Guest

    I have been doing voiceovers and spoken word with a Rode NTK, SPL De-esser, and Sound Forge. but recently I bought an EV RE20 and ran it into my UA 6176 and was blown away by how smooth and creamy it sounds. So the RE20 into a 6176 is my first choice, followed by my MXL V67 Mogami into a TC Electronics Gold Channel (custom preset).
  13. maintiger

    maintiger Distinguished Member

    Dec 3, 2003
    Whittier, California, USA
    Home Page:
    a ribbon works well... I have an rca D77 which gets you a creamy sound for VO's- there are some ribbon mics out there that compare- (I forget who makes it but there is a D77 copy out there for about a grand)

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