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What do you do when the "vibe" of your session

Discussion in 'Pro Audio Equipment' started by anonymous, May 28, 2001.

  1. anonymous

    anonymous Guests

    So...you're running a session and a couple of the band members decide to have an argument...or one thing leads to another, and the vibe that was once there--isn't.

    What do you do to get the thing back on track and productive again?
     
  2. hargerst

    hargerst Distinguished Member

    If it's early on in the session, I'd call a break and try some "attitude adjustment" to see if I can get them back on track. If it's late in the session, I'd call it quits, but I'd get the problem resolved (somehow) before they split for the night.

    If it carried over to the next day, I'd call a group meeting and basically say, "Hey guys, this is ^#$%ed and we ain't gonna get anything worthwhile if it keeps up, so fix it or let's call it quits".
     
  3. realdynamix

    realdynamix Well-Known Member

    Being the middleman in an argument is not very comfortable. If there is a producer, than a deliberate look would signal a message. If all else fails, "the clock is ticking" sometimes brings a quick resolution.
    Been there a few times. Hope it works out.
    --Rick
     
  4. dgooder

    dgooder Guest

    I don't think there is any one answer.

    If you're in charge of vibe, you should already have a good idea of the personalities involved, making the solution a "custom fix" for the situation. It may be as simple as a few chosen words (inspirational) or playing a favorite cut over the mains. Sometimes you need to break out the pipe, other times a break for food works. One thing for certain is to stay positive (unless negativity is the artist's "thing"). I don't think a good fix would be to remind them the "clock is ticking." That in itself will destroy the vibe.

    Dave g http://www.groovestainproductions.com
     
  5. miketholen

    miketholen Member

    :eek: that's the producer's job. :D
    I refuse to work or try to work under a bad vibe. Nothing happens...worth a $*^t anyway.
    I've tried producing but it seems you need a masters in psychology to make $*^t happen. Or you need to be such a hard ass that there's no room for "bad vibe"
    I like to engineer much better, I'm in my own little world somewhat. the other approach I've been exposed to is to do a bunch of drugs/alcohol and work away-while this approach is temporary it is a band aid of sorts that doesn't always heal the wound but sometimes it's magic!
    :D
     
  6. Ang1970

    Ang1970 Well-Known Member

    Originally posted by David Goodermuth:
    One thing for certain is to stay positive (unless negativity is the artist's "thing").
    You mean like pessimism? Or all out Satanic worship? LOL

    Sometimes people just have to get things off their chest. Sometimes they are burned out from the last 18 months on the road. Sometimes they don't even want to be in the band anymore, and are begging for someone else to remove the responsibility of quitting for them. Each situation may require a different fix.

    Coming from you Fletcher, this is a bit like "which compressor should I use on the snare?" hehe :)
     
  7. alphajerk

    alphajerk Active Member

    the quickest fix i had was i recorded their little arguement and blasted that over the cans, they stopped dead in their tracks to stare at us in the CR rolling over laughing and started laughing themselves. it was a getting it off the chests situation. another fight they were having whilei was hooking up the microphones and was busting a gut at them, nearly in tears from laughing at them fight. they were even gonna take it outside so they wouldnt disrespect my studio. i was going to get my video camera and everything... ended up rolling a bob instead.

    sometimes, the peace pipe is in order

    other times is a lunch/dinner break

    or a call it for the day.

    i have moderated too many situations boiling in the bands, that required delicate care. im pretty good at that, even got back together a band that was really good but had disbanded, of course they probably hate me now but they are playing again. just fixed a problem in another. you just have to gain all the members trust and dont play sides unless there is an obvious one.
     
  8. lebozze

    lebozze Guest

    Originally posted by Fletcher:
    So...you're running a session and a couple of the band members decide to have an argument...or one thing leads to another, and the vibe that was once there--isn't.

    What do you do to get the thing back on track and productive again?

    Hi Fletcher.
    have a rest, time always make problems fade away.And also, keep your attitude positive.
    Don't ever give them the impression that
    the problem is wasting studio time. Tell everybody that this happens sometimes.
    Just figure out how serious the problem is and then take a decision.

    Cheers
    Filippo
     
  9. alphajerk

    alphajerk Active Member

    you know worse than just band members fighting that i have had to deal with is boyfriend/girlfriend in the band im recording on a "break" :D that you should just stay out of all together and make use of the tension in the recording.
     
  10. bluebass

    bluebass Guest

    Did a session at a local college about 2 years ago where the band came in and was dead! I mean riga-mortis had set in. Apparently, the drummer had gone out the night before and had a severe hang-over and everybody was pissed.

    After barely getting through two songs you could cut the tension with a knife. The vibe was complete toilet water and everybody knew it.

    About halfway through the third song the guitar player exploded and set off a chain reaction. The entire band was screaming at the top of there lungs at the drummer and at each other. They stormed out of the studio and didn't come back for about 30 minutes.

    When they came back they all looked a bit ruffed up, especially the drummer who definitely had a shiner.

    They picked up their instruments, asked if I was ready, and went to town! What
    ever gang initiation like ceremony had gone on in the parking lot, it worked wonders.

    They went from totally dead and disgusted to fired up and ready to kill! The takes after there little brawl were 100 percent better.

    Not sure if 'fisticuffs' in the parking lot will work in allot of instances...but it sure did that time! ;)

    Tim L
     
  11. anonymous

    anonymous Guests

    I tend to use boredome as a trick. bore em with some stories or an over long 'break' or some tedius recording task.. till they get keen to 'get down with it finaly!!!"
    The same would work with a fight... just yak on till they are desperate for you to shut up & pick up their guitars!
    :)
    Jules
     
  12. Kevin F. Rose

    Kevin F. Rose Active Member

    Originally posted by alphajerk:
    you know worse than just band members fighting that i have had to deal with is boyfriend/girlfriend in the band im recording on a "break"

    Dude, I live for this kind of $*^t...used to go to the club thick part of town at 2 in the am just to watch the stupidity fly.
    We have a cattle prod at the studio that comes in tres handy for these instances. I had a husband and wife team in and every time someone ^#$%ed up or bitched I'd offer it to one of the bandmembers as a joke. Sometimes it gets used... It will break the tension.
    The other method which works for a battle of opinion or ideas means stating; "it's quicker to try it than deny it." Arguing just wastes time, energy and greatly decreases sperm count. If that doesn't work call 'em both dumbasses and suggest using the sphincterphone.
    One thing for certain this is the kind of $*^t recording school can't teach you. You got it or you don't.
     
  13. Jay Hudson

    Jay Hudson Guest

    I would suggest a food break.
     

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