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who do you mix for?

Discussion in 'Pro Audio Equipment' started by planet red, Nov 8, 2001.

  1. planet red

    planet red Active Member

    Im just now getting into recording other people other than my friends bands and own projects. The project im working on now is a full length LP (yes vinyl... no clue why) for a punk rock band. Everything is recorded and now we're mixing and they want to ruin the whole mix. For some reason they hate mids. They want everything "scooped". I did a mix that i thought was pretty good, but they just want TONS of bass and high end. I dont want to release something that doesnt sound good with my name on it. So do you listen to what they say or do you just do what you want and tell them to F off? I really hate conflict, and if the project turns out well I know ill be booked up for awhile by a bunch of other bands. What to do what to do.....
     
  2. Scott Gould

    Scott Gould Active Member

    It's the golden rule - he who has the gold rules. In other words, whoever's paying calls the shots. If you don't want your name on the project, they should honor that too. Next time you'll know better. :D

    Scott
     
  3. soulconnect

    soulconnect Guest

    Why don't you have them play you a couple of cds where they like the sound, and then compare it to the sound of your mix. I've learned a lot about the bottom by listening to Dr. Dre. When you switch back and forth, it will be obvious if you have scooped too much mid. At least you'll have a common place to start talking from. The best outcome for a mix is to have everyone in agreement that it sounds good. You'll be happier with it too.

    Steve
     
  4. McAllister

    McAllister Member

    . . . now might be time to come up with an alias. To be used when you don't want your name attached. Of course, you can make up any story to feed the band; or you can spill the truth.
    Maybe make 2 mixes? one for the band, one for you - then you can blame it all on the mastering engineer.
    (that's a joke, guys. honest)
     
  5. anonymous

    anonymous Guests

    Get them to bring in a bunch of their favorite CD's. Pick one you can stand (or even like) then use this as a 'tone spectrum benchmark' for your mix sessions.. Switch back & forth between your mix & the CD and try to match it somewhat. They can't argue much with that, and it will show up the error of their ways if they were 'off target' on the scoped mids thang.. Reference reference reference - who is driving this bus anyway?

    :)
     
  6. MadMoose

    MadMoose Active Member

    I'm with Jules. Tell them that the studio monitors sound different then any system they own and they should bring CD's that they like the sound off to reference to. That solves two problems. First, they get to hear what your room sounds like. Second, you get to find out what kind of sound they're looking for. Vinyl is still big in the punk world. I've done a few 7" releases this year.
     
  7. Starfields76

    Starfields76 Guest

    Red - I hear ya, man. It's a very stressful situation to be in the middle of. Recently I worked with a band here that put me in a similar state of frustration only it was over a different kind of issue.

    Some bands don't want to sound good. I know it sounds silly but it's true. There is some kind of artsy mentality that tells them if it's too hifi or something that their credibility or integrity as an artist will be compromised. Be patient with that mentality though. The talent can be fragile sometimes.

    I agree that you should defniately reference the mixes to another CD the band brings you. If anything, it will give you an idea of why they are looking for that kind of sound.

    Good luck and let us know what happens with it.

    Kevin Bruchert
    Producer / Engineer
    Open Forum Audio
     
  8. planet red

    planet red Active Member

    Exactly, they dont want to sound good. They have brought it other cd's that sound like total mud and talk about how great they sound. Then i'll play something of similar genre that i think sounds good and they complain about the mids and clarity. It comes down to them not wanting to sound good and me not wanting to put my name on something that sounds bad.
     
  9. Bill Plummer

    Bill Plummer Guest

    Originally posted by planet red:
    The project im working on now is a full length LP (yes vinyl... no clue why) for a punk rock band. Everything is recorded and now we're mixing and they want to ruin the whole mix. For some reason they hate mids. They want everything "scooped". I did a mix that i thought was pretty good, but they just want TONS of bass and high end.

    They don't understand how mixes for vinyl are done. Extreme high and low end doesn't help a viynl product. It causes problems in manufacturing that aren't a concern for digital products. If you HAVE to scoop mids, don't hype the top and bottom too.
     
  10. MadMoose

    MadMoose Active Member

    Originally posted by planet red:
    Exactly, they dont want to sound good. They have brought it other cd's that sound like total mud and talk about how great they sound. Then i'll play something of similar genre that i think sounds good and they complain about the mids and clarity. It comes down to them not wanting to sound good and me not wanting to put my name on something that sounds bad.

    You could always tell them that someone else should mix it. Sometimes it's easier or better to walk away.
     
  11. Irene

    Irene Guest

    Planet Red

    You want to get more bookings so I think the best way to do that is to give them what they want. They are clear about it, and you say other records they like have the sound they're after. So I think it's a matter of taste not 'good versus bad'. Good energy generates work. I don't think people will judge you harshly on getting a niche sound right for a punk band, the opposite probably. Also if if you don't do it for them they may do it afterwards anyway and then you might really regret not having done it yourself !!!
    Good luck

    Renie
     
  12. planet red

    planet red Active Member

    YES! I was getting tired of mixing with them around and telling me everything I was doing didnt sound good, so I asked them to run out and get something to eat and I finished a full song the way I thought it should be and they came back and LOVED it. I guess they needed to hear a finished song.
    Isnt it a great feeling when you A/B your mixes against a record thats mastered and that had a way bigger budget and yours sounds better?
     
  13. Bill Plummer

    Bill Plummer Guest

    It's always a good idea to be left alone when you setup a mix. Get it close and THEN let it be heard. At that time be very open-minded about changes. This way you get to present your vision of the mix, and then the artist gets to offer theirs. If you both are coming from the same place it works out quite well.
     
  14. anonymous

    anonymous Guests

    "Isnt it a great feeling when you A/B your mixes against a record thats mastered and that had a way bigger budget and yours sounds better?"

    YES!

    :w:
     

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