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Working hours

Discussion in 'Recording' started by E-an, Nov 5, 2000.

  1. E-an

    E-an Guest

    Lo again,

    Just wondered what sorta hours other people work in their studio jobs, whether it be engineering, producing, editing or whatever?

    Do you dictate what hours you work, or is it more down the client and gauging how their creativity and enthusiasm is going....?

    How do you deal with those long long sessions - making sure you keep yourself mentally awake?

    Cya
     
  2. e-cue

    e-cue Active Member

    This ain't no hobby. 100 hours a week is my average. If this feels like work to you & your looking foward to 'time-off', I'd suggest find one of those real-jobs.
     
  3. SonOfSmawg

    SonOfSmawg Well-Known Member

    GET A REAL JOB? Man, if you are doing anything for 100 hours a week, you need
    to get a real life!!!
    Just kidding...I admire your dedication.
    I'm one of those guys with a real job,
    still building-up my studio on the side.
    It's not all so bad, though...at least I'm not touring!
     
  4. Ang1970

    Ang1970 Well-Known Member

    People who aren't from "the industry" don't get it when I tell them "between 20 and 160 hours/week."

    If you are freelance, you get to dictate your own hours... (Translation: you take every gig that comes to you and don't ever turn any work down.) If you are a house/staff engineer you're at the mercy of the studio.

    Mentally awake? Well, there's coffee. Notice how every studio worth it's salt has a pot waiting for you when you walk in? After a while (5-8 years) you kinda get used to it.


    ------------------
    --------------
    Angelo Quaglia
    AQ Productions
     
  5. E-an

    E-an Guest

    hehe nice comments all.....

    thanks e-cue but it isnt a hobby - I suspect like the rest of you its my life and I love my work! I have no concerns whatsoever about working very long hours.

    But still I do look forward to time off... everyone must do every so often. Time off to me is listening to more music / reading etc. but hey its still time off.

    As for coffeeeeeee.. man too much of that caffeine cant be good. Need to find something less horrific... gives me chest pains when I drink too much - LOL

    What I was actually referring to in terms of sessions was how do you deal with sessions where it is obvious the artist is tired and *should* knock it on the head.... but wants to continue - do you sit there wasting their time and yours?

    Just interested, chill peeps on the i work millions of hours competitions as well!

    Peace all,
    E
     
  6. Ang1970

    Ang1970 Well-Known Member

    If you yourself are not the producer, it really isn't your place to make that call. All you can do is try to get the producer to listen to what is happening so s/he can either tell you to wrap it up or find some way to inspire the talent.

    If you are the producer, don't beat around the bush. Tell em, "GET THE F*** OUT OF MY STUDIO!" No, just kidding, hehe. Just say, "We need to wrap this up and start fresh in the morning." New artists don't always know that that's an option.

    If the artist is the producer, they may need to learn where the limit of their abilities lies. Trying is the only way they can find out (and if they are paying for the session, they are entitled). Some people know where their limit is, and deliberately push themselves past it in order to elicit performances from a dreamlike state.

    Hope that helps,

    ------------------
    --------------
    Angelo Quaglia
    AQ Productions
     
  7. Originally posted by SonOfSmawg:
    It's not all so bad, though...at least I'm not touring![/B]

    Tell me about it!! 60-100 in a studio would be a, "real job," to me, and much preferable to my current situation. Load the truck, drive six hours, sleep four, arrive at the venue, unload the truck (sometimes the crew is great, other times you get stuck with kids), do sound check and rehersal, troubleshoot system, mix monitors (on an ancient Harrison), pack truck, drive five hours.........all for $150 per show. It works out to about minimum wage or less.
    Gawd, I love show business!

    :p :p
     
  8. e-cue

    e-cue Active Member

    If audio professionals (studio & live) quit their 'jobs' and got together, we could end world hunger, created world peace, and find a cure for cancer. Personally, I'd trade in all these for phatter kick drums. The only time I consider it work is when I have to chase down my money from some a-hole at the record label that's trying to b.s. me about how my 10th invoice was misplaced.
     
  9. anonymous

    anonymous Guests

    When I'm producing, our day starts at 10am. I expect the assistant "on venue" at 9a, the engineer between 9:30 and 9:45. We work until 6p, dinner break until 7-ish, then work until Midnight-ish.

    I also have a rule called "Sober 'till 6", which is no drugs, no drinking before "dinner break". The assistant must remain 100% sober at all times. The engineer can have a coupla three drinks if he feels it won't get in the way (especially when I'm engineering).

    I really hate working past midnight, though sometimes you have a real creative thing going and don't want to break the 'vibe'. I absolutely hate having my days 'turned around' [you know, the get up at 6 in the evening, start the session at 8pm and end at noon, 1p].

    Even doing my 'weasel' day gig...it's around 80+ hours a week. Depends on the week.
     
  10. anonymous

    anonymous Guests

    Originally posted by e-cue:
    The only time I consider it work is when I have to chase down my money from some a-hole at the record label that's trying to b.s. me about how my 10th invoice was misplaced.

    Sorry I missed this the first time through this thread. May I suggest you learn 'the discipline of the baseball bat'. I've had more than a few of those in my day (one of the main reasons I'm pretty happy being a weasel).

    There was one A&R admin moron who tried to string out my money past 100 days...I went to his office and casually explained that when I left his office, I would be taking my money, or his spleen...and I'd really prefer the money. His genius response was "are you threatening me?" Pulling out a switchblade I said: "no, promising"...to which he replied "you're never going to work for this label again"...and I said: "I knew that when you were 60 days late you moron, now get my fuckin' money before I have to hurt you".

    It worked, I got my money, and never worked for that label again. Funny, these people think that when they don't pay you but dangle other work infront of you that you'll be motivated to do more work for them to not get paid. Somehow, I miss the wisdom of that logic.
     
  11. e-cue

    e-cue Active Member

    lol, Fletch- You don't happen to work for Death Row Records do you???
     
  12. Aaron-Carey

    Aaron-Carey Active Member

    Ive gone after people before, only for them to try and guilt trip me, that its MY fault that I depend on my clients paying me! I think a lot of us would be happy if we were payed for even half of the time we spend.
    People want the most anal edits, righteous turd polishing, yet when it comes to their bill, dont want to pay even demo rates! I always tell them, " half, just HALF of your daily drug habbit money would pay your bill off! "
     
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  14. Guido

    Guido Guest

    I only guarantee my work if I spend no more than 8 hours in the studio on any one session. I honestly feel my hearing/mental wellness is much better because the last 6 years I have stuck closely to that schedule. Anything past 8 hrs. and I'm just guessin' at how it sounds. If we're "close" I have no problem hanging around and finishing. I have spent way too many hours fixing/remixing/recutting tracks I spent 16 hour days working on the first time. Just my opinion, but I have a few associates who do the same thing. Your hearing is precious and I cannot stress the importance of how much long, long days listening, even at reasonably quiet monitor levels, can screw with your ears. Without mine...I'm toast. I know some, however, that will debate the fact that I had "ears" to begin with....
     
  15. davemc

    davemc Guest

    Yeah 8-9 hours now a days and that is it for me. Its that stupid computer screen that does it, I used to do 12-14 hours no problem with analog. Its the blastered time concentrating editing/comping tracks. Then naming and/or keeping every vocal take. Then listening to said vocal takes to get half a word from one and etc. No one should of every told the musicians about this.
     
  16. e-cue

    e-cue Active Member

    CARPAL TUNNEL CARPAL TUNNEL!
    It's kinda funny how I work behind a computer all day, and then come home to spend more time on the computer. Shesh.
    I love the fact that I print stems / keep all my work in protools. Sure, I back it up. But I never give the back-ups to the slimy jerk-offs at the label. It's humerous to watch how quickly I get paid when labels need an emergency edit done.
     
  17. Gregg

    Gregg Guest

    After set up I usually limit the session to 6 or 7 hours as IMO the typical artist is out of juice. Once in a while we'll take it longer if it's working for everybody. Fresh is better. It's hard to say for sure but it seems like 40% or so of all the tracks we keep are the very first thing played. My fave is to say, "OK, run through the song so I can get levels and play the whole piece so I can check it all." Hit red and sometimes that's it.

    On the money thing I've saved myself lots of grief by getting it +up front+. Labels have to pay half of the projected budget in advance. When that's earned they do it again, half of what's left and so on. Credit has only worked well with established clients. :cool:

    Cheers,

    TB
     
  18. nrgmusic

    nrgmusic Member

    E-an wrote:
    ---------------------------------------------------------
    What I was actually referring to in terms of sessions was how do you deal with sessions where it is obvious the artist is tired and *should* knock it on the head.... but wants to continue - do you sit there wasting their time and yours?
    ---------------------------------------------------------
    Absolutely not!!
    If the Artist is tired I will always can the session, exactly for the reason that I do not want to waste their time or mine doing things that will end up in the trash the following day. I just kinda try to break it to them gently but firmly and call it a day. As Tonbarge said I also try to limit the sessions to about 6-7 hours and an absolute max out at 10 if we are on a buzz and to stop the session would lose a crucial performance.

    Simon :D
     
  19. alphajerk

    alphajerk Active Member

    absolutely no work in my studio before 2PM. i dont think people [musicians especially] have their brain in order in the morning hours. and sessions can go as late as 5am. i find MOST creativity happends @ 3am.

    the only sobriety rule i have is during setup, once signals are flowing... intoxicants should as well. its not until the room spins that it gets difficult to work on music [now if i was doing open heart surgery...]
     
  20. nrgmusic

    nrgmusic Member

    Quote;
    Originally posted by Alphajerk
    ---------------------------------------------------------
    the only sobriety rule i have is during setup, once signals are flowing... intoxicants should as well. its not until the room spins that it gets difficult to work on music [now if i was doing open heart surgery...]
    ---------------------------------------------------------

    Thats the way to do it!!!

    Simon :)
     

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