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Your thoughts

Discussion in 'Pro Audio Equipment' started by dirtysanchez, Dec 23, 2002.

  1. dirtysanchez

    dirtysanchez Guest

    What is your opinion on Conservatory of Recording Arts & Sciences. Do you think it is worth it? I have a friend who started there recently and I told him he would be better off money and career wise if he just found an intership here in town and learned that way. He opted for the school. What's your thoughts?
     
  2. Kurt Foster

    Kurt Foster Distinguished Member

    I look at all "recording school" programes with a raised eyebrow. A lot of this lies with the fact that for many of them there are no prerequisite requirements … other than the ability to write a huge cheque! In my opinion, a lot of the students in these types of schools are attending because their parents have insisted they do something and going to a recording school seems to be a glamorous and easy way to Mom and Dad off their back! They come out of these "schools" unprepared to make a living and with Mommy and Daddy saying "That's it, we've met our responsibility .. it's time for you to make your own way!" One intern "The Conservatory of Recording Arts & Sciences" sent me would come to sessions, sit and literally cry to the clients how his rich Mommy and Daddy didn't understand him because they wouldn't continue to support him in the fashion he had become accustomed to. All in all, it comes down to what the student does with the information and knowledge they gain at such an institution. I have had interns from "The Conservatory of Recording Arts & Sciences" and other programes that were idiots and I have had some that knew what they were doing and had a real passion for the art.

    I also once knew a guy that secured a position at "The Conservatory of Recording Arts & Sciences" as an instructor. The thought crossed my mind, "How did he get that position?" My basic impression of him was he was a moron. (I seem to think that about a lot of people in audio, sometimes myself included.) :D Go figure! After a student completes the curriculum, if they cannot secure an internship at a studio, they cannot get their diploma. "The Conservatory of Recording Arts & Sciences" does attempt to assist in placing a student in an internship but there are no guarantees. In a percentile, very few students from these types of schools ever go on to become a big time recording engineer. These feelings I am sharing are not exclusive to "The Conservatory of Recording Arts & Sciences" but rather all these types of programes.

    I advise young people who are interested in this business to go to College and take electronics, computer and business administration courses. Get a degree! Learn to earn money! Money doesn't buy happiness, but it sure makes a good down payment! On the side they can get involved recording their friends. Many "real" colleges also offer some rudimentary or even quite good audio recording and television courses, to supplement their music and media curriculum. IMO that is the way to go. …………….. Fats
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    It's my opinion, I'll play with it if I want to!
     
  3. e-cue

    e-cue Active Member

    I'd suggest it. Here's why. It's a lot cheaper than the other schools, and the peers I've met after recording school (yeah, I went to one so effin' what) from the Consevatory ended up on the same level on avarage as everyone else. My advice, goto a cheaper school because you really learn the meat & potatos the year after you graduate scrubbin toliets, mopping floors, and doing food runs. Recording schools aren't nessasary, but they will teach you a lot of stuff that will take you a long time to learn on your own. As with any education, I'd suggest concentrating on learning, not on grades.
     
  4. dirtysanchez

    dirtysanchez Guest

    thanks for the responses.

    e-cue,
    i agree with you about the scrubbing toilets, etc. and this was another thing I told my friend. I feel that part of the engineering experience has to do with dealing with people. You have to have patience in some aspects and none in others and he is not one that will take "go clean that toilet" lightly.
    To me it's to each his own. I couldn't afford the school so I chose finding someone locally who was willing to take an intern. I feel that I've learned quite a bit that way, and I don't work well in the classroom environment.

    thanks again for all ya'lls insite!
     

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