Skip to main content

Jewel Case inserts and tray liners

Member for

18 years 5 months
Hi,

At the high school I teach in, we produce a holiday Cd and in addition to duplication of the Cds, we do all the printing in house on a risograph (one color at a time low res printer) Because of this we've been very limited in the cover art we are able to produce.
Because this is a huge fundraiser I don't want to have to go through a printer and pay $1 or more per unit on paper for our Cds. I was wondering if anyone knows of a company that handles stock Christmas images that we could print the specifics of the CD on top of?

These could either be pre cut to Cd size or 8.5 x 11 or 11 x 17.

I did some searches and could only find blank templates or the "we'll make your design for you" types that are $1 or more each. For that price I could print my own, but we're looking at close to 2,000 units this year. I can buy 11 x 17 paper for $40.

Any help out in RO land?

Comments

Member for

17 years 8 months

Cucco Wed, 12/20/2006 - 10:49
Phil -

For what it's worth, we do all of our own printing in house here and our finished products (if I don't mind saying so myself) look pretty damn good.

For tray liners, we either use Neat-O pre-scored liners or we use a Martin-Yale device which cuts and scores paper so we can make our own.

For the jackets, we do a minimum of a 4 page booklet. To print, we use a high-weight gloss paper (which is the same kind used in commercial release CDs) The make/model is:
MeadWestvaco - Sterling White Gloss (Text)

It ain't cheap (around $80 per box with only half what's in a standard box of paper) and it ain't light (if you're beginning to age like I am, bring a helper!)

We fold manually (we have looked into paper folders, but I most to be too inprecise).

Then, to cut, I picked up a stack cutter on E-bay. It cost me about $120 versus the same cutter in the paper store which would have cost me about $600-$800. I had to assemble it myself and tweak it so that the alignment was right, but that only took a couple hours total.

As for the printing, we use color laser printers by Oki. You can actually pick these up REALLY cheap nowadays.

I used to use a wax-based printer by Xerox (Phaser 850) which cost about $4000. The new okis though set me back around $450 each.

If you'd like, I'll gladly send you a sample of one of our disc jackets.

If you did all this yourself, you might be out $600 or so to start, but it will save you TONS in the future. (I've figured it out, it costs me less than $.20 to create each jacket. Even factoring paying myself or my wife a nominal fee to do the "setup")

J.

Member for

19 years 11 months

Thomas W. Bethel Thu, 12/21/2006 - 04:55
We too use the OKI printer and we too had a Xerox 3200 wax printer which was nothing but a BIG HEADACHE and very costly to maintain and use. The service contract was really expensive but having their tech comeout on a one shot tech support call was even more so. The OKI really does a very nice job and I think it even looks better than the XEROX for consistant output. The Xerox was going though a lot of ink sticks in "idle" mode and we threw out a lot of melted crayon mess that was very expensive. At one point we had a clogged print head and the tech went though 4 ink sticks in about a 1/2 hour trying to clean the print head. ($99.00 for 4 print sticks) We finally donated the machine and the remaining inksticks to a local arts organization as a parts machine. It was not a very cost effective machine to own or to use. We could have actually purchased a new one for less than the cost of the print head for our old one. The OKI works great and so far all the clients love the output. We do our own in house cutting and folding and on CD printing and we have a heat tunnel and sealer for the CDs. We did NOT want to become a printing and packaging operation but we could not find anyone locally who could consistantly produce good looking and sounding CDs in small runs without charging us an arm and a leg so we were kind of forced into it.

Member for

18 years 5 months

pmolsonmus Thu, 12/21/2006 - 05:51
Hi,

Thanks for the info. The total bill from HotCards for 2000 booklets and trayliners was just over $300 bucks plus shipping. It was about the same for just paper and prescored liners when I looked into it. They print, cut, fold and score for that price. Which means I don't have to do it or oversee quality control.

As producer, engineer, mixer, master(er?), music director, baby-sitter, crowd control, piano player, chief cook and bottle washer - if I don't need to oversee the paper end of this thing as well, I'm happy. And oh yeah, it's Christmas and we've got about a-gazillion concerts and other activities going on.

We're at about 1000 Cds sold already. Mechanical royalties cost about $900, Cds, Jewel Cases and paper approx another $1,000. That means almost 8k in profits. Any wonder why we don't sell pizzas?

Phil

Member for

17 years 8 months

Cucco Thu, 12/21/2006 - 06:34
pmolsonmus wrote: Hi,

Thanks for the info. The total bill from HotCards for 2000 booklets and trayliners was just over $300 bucks plus shipping. It was about the same for just paper and prescored liners when I looked into it. They print, cut, fold and score for that price. Which means I don't have to do it or oversee quality control.

As producer, engineer, mixer, master(er?), music director, baby-sitter, crowd control, piano player, chief cook and bottle washer - if I don't need to oversee the paper end of this thing as well, I'm happy. And oh yeah, it's Christmas and we've got about a-gazillion concerts and other activities going on.

We're at about 1000 Cds sold already. Mechanical royalties cost about $900, Cds, Jewel Cases and paper approx another $1,000. That means almost 8k in profits. Any wonder why we don't sell pizzas?

Phil

That's awesome Phil!!! Congratulations!

I'm glad to see someone out there taking care of the mechanical licenses! (I'm sure most of our acoustic recording bretheren out here in RO land do as well!) Some of my competition here in the area have never heard of such things!

Granted, when I only sell 40 of a disc, it's difficult to obtain a license, but the word is "difficult" not impossible! (Actually, I have one publisher to whom I submitted a request in 1999 for 32 discs. The discs have long since been sold and likely are never ever played - it was for a Jr. High Band concert in Timbuktu! - but still - I've yet to hear back from them. My usual turn around on licenses from publishers directly is pretty long - 3-4 months! I wish Harry Fox would license smaller quantities!)

Anyway -

Tom -

I totally feel your heartache re: the Xerox! When we first got the printer, we would turn it on and off when needed. BIG mistake. We wasted so much ink! Then, after our 3 year service contract expired, it seemed like we had a tech out at least once a month! Minimum call- $100! Then, like you said, we were constantly throwing out ink that the printer would waste.

Everyone LOVED the raised text/graphics feel and appearance of the Xerox, but it was definitely not worth the headache.

The Okis have been trouble free and consistent. I wouldn't trade them for the world!

J.
x