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Basement Studio

 

For those who hate to read, the main points:
Just starting
$4-5k budget
Transforming my basement
Style: Acoustic guitar, vocals, some electric
Information on setting up acoustics for a room
Looking for: a nice 'real' sound
Estimated costs / suggestions: mixers, compressors, mics, the works


Hey everyone, I'm new here, and have pretty much just started out recording music. Right now I run on my laptop, and for equipment I only have an SM57 and a little behringer xenyx 502.

I guess for what it is, it gets the job done. But I want something that sounds really nice and not so 'far off'

My budget - $4-5000
Project - Transform my basement into a studio
Get some good stuff for recording

I'm a songwriter and most of my stuff is acoustic with mixed drums (drumkit from hell + fruity loops to tie it together) But I love all kinds of music so I have some songs that use electric guitar and of course you gotta love some techno once in a while.

I would describe my style as somewhere in between Jack Johnson, Matt Pond PA, and with a little Joe Satriani mixed in.

 

Comments

Jeremy Tue, 01/16/2007 - 20:08
you can get some really great drums for under a grand. I have a Peavey radial pro kit that has the best kick I have ever heard. I also have a Premier XPK that has an awesome sound for the toms and snare, but a smooth subtle kick even with a superkick1. You could get Pacific drums, or even a cool gretsch catalina cub rock kit that has a massive 26" kick. I love drums they are like Harley's you just want to shine them up and look at them.

Pro Audio Guest Mon, 01/22/2007 - 20:24
In response to something cucco said about micing the drums. I do agree with the fact that you can get a good recording from just 3 mics. But i've always felt that you don't really have too much controlled after the fact of how the drum sounds in the recording. ex: You get done recording the drum track, get the bass guitar recorded, and you find the bass drum gets drown out too much, you have no way of raising the bass drum a little, unless you raise the bass on the eq of the whole drum track.

I just think that micing each drum seperately gives you more control over the final product. This can help alot if you have in experienced drummers, and they bring their own set and well, it just doesn't sound too great.

Pro Audio Guest Thu, 01/25/2007 - 14:27
drumkit

I admit that I didn't read ALL the posts to find out if someone had caught this yet... but you're all debating drum mics whereas the guy never mentioned having a drumkit that I had read.

He mentioned having "drumkit from hell" which is a midi drum program.
GT The Brick preamp

So my first suggestion would be to save money by not buying drum mics.

If you have the guitar, and you're using synth-drums, and you're STILL looking to spend $4k, then you might as well go all out and buy a Neumann tube mic, a nice tube preamp, and... hmm... sure... a firepod. See, you can even skip the mixer by multitracking, and recording seperate takes between the vocals and guitar.


That's the easiest was to spend $4k when all you need is a mic, pre-amp, and a method of input.

Pro Audio Guest Thu, 01/25/2007 - 16:46
Acoustic Treatment

I would like to get into the acoustic treatment a bit more... I too am relocating my studio into a basement type of room. It'l be broken up into 2 rooms (control room and live tracking room). The ceilings are low (prob about 6') and as of now, it is completely cement all around. I have a complete Auralex kit for my control room, but I have yet to figure out what exactly I'm going to do to the tracking room.

Does anyone have some basic recomendations on a tight budget (ie: simply using carpet, should I use hardwood flooring, etc etc). Any help would be great. Thanks!

Scoobie Thu, 01/25/2007 - 17:44
AumStudioBrain said................
I would like to get into the acoustic treatment a bit more...

I would ask that question over in the acoustic & design fourm. You will get lots of help their. Also, Ethan Winer's web site can answer any question you have about acoustic treatment.



The ceilings are low (prob about 6').......

I would use another room if I could........I wouldn't be able to stand up,LOL
JMHO.........

Peace........Scoobie

Pro Audio Guest Thu, 01/25/2007 - 21:56
Re: Acoustic Treatment

AumStudioBrian wrote: I would like to get into the acoustic treatment a bit more... I too am relocating my studio into a basement type of room. It'l be broken up into 2 rooms (control room and live tracking room).

The ceilings are low (prob about 6') and as of now, it is completely cement all around. I have a complete Auralex kit for my control room, but I have yet to figure out what exactly I'm going to do to the tracking room.

Does anyone have some basic recomendations on a tight budget (ie: simply using carpet, should I use hardwood flooring, etc etc)

John L Sayers forum. Bar none, the best forum (by far) there is regarding both the field of sound control/acoustics and also studio construction techniques. You have any questions... ask there.

They are however in a whole other league. Perhaps far too obsessive-compulsive for the average person to deal with. If you ask one question.... they'll ask you 100 questions in return.... but if you bear with the hazing.... they'll give you great advice.

Only comment I would have is to make the control room 10 - 20 percent bigger than you think you need it, even if that means making the studio/live rooms smaller (unless you plan on having a lot of bands in your studio).

Hardwood floors are preferable in my opinion, albeit pricey. Carpet is perfectly acceptable for a home studio. However, I'd stick with the commercial type carpeting, as opposed to longer fiber traditional house carpeting.

Carpeting has the advantage that you can always take it up if you decide that you would rather have a wood floor instead. With hardwood, your making a big investment at $6 - $8 per square foot (for real wood, not the cheap laminate (pergo) shit... which always feels and looks like pergo no matter how hard the manufacturers try to make their fake floors simulate real hardwood).

You may find that you had wished you had put some nice patterned commercial carpet down instead of the wood. I have known several people who ran home studios that regretted putting wood floors down. It is a trade-off between the "wow" factor which impresses guests or clients with nice wood floors.... versus having a certain degree of comfort in your home studio (carpet).
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