DonnyThompson

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 25, 2012
Location
Akron/Cleveland, OH
Your link took me to Mix, which is certainly a trusted source for information. I have several boxes in storage filled with old Mix magazines, some issues going back to 1981/82. Lol, those were the "SSL Years"... for awhile, it seemed like every other page was either an article or an advert for Solid State Logic at that time.

Another trustable source is Sound On Sound Magazine ( SOS), which do very well-written and informative reviews. TapeOp is another great trade mag, though it is geared a little more towards analog tools.
And, RO is also a good source, too ...to get educated opinions on certain tools that you may be interested in. There are many veterans here, from both the analog and digital world. I wouldn't go as far to say it's totally unbiased, because opinions generally are not; but, you can get informed opinions from members, many of whom have actual hands-on experience with a great many and different audio tools, including both HW and SW.
:)
-d.
 
Joined
Nov 24, 2017
Location
Hampshire, UK
Performance is Key/king. As I've always been taught as a musician, and it's obvious to me that that is the key element in session recording and live performances for that matter! I have completed a diploma in Music at college (not the same in the US, college is further from secondary education), as well as top marks for an O-Level/GCSE in Music. (secondary education level here in the UK). If it wasn't for my extensive background and genuine interest in instruments, the components involved and the environments in which things are created/recorded etc.. I'd never be where I am today. Just.. ugh, such a set back for me with my poor health.
 
Joined
Nov 24, 2017
Location
Hampshire, UK
Your link took me to Mix, which is certainly a trusted source for information. I have several boxes in storage filled with old Mix magazines, some issues going back to 1981/82. Lol, those were the "SSL Years"... for awhile, it seemed like every other page was either an article or an advert for Solid State Logic at that time.

Another trustable source is Sound On Sound Magazine ( SOS), which do very well-written and informative reviews. TapeOp is another great trade mag, though it is geared a little more towards analog tools.
And, RO is also a good source, too ...to get educated opinions on certain tools that you may be interested in. There are many veterans here, from both the analog and digital world. I wouldn't go as far to say it's totally unbiased, because opinions generally are not; but, you can get informed opinions from members, many of whom have actual hands-on experience with a great many and different audio tools, including both HW and SW.
:)
-d.
Been signed up to SOS for while now! And I will for sure get my head stuck into TapeOp ;) Loving RO so far!
 

Kurt Foster

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 2, 2002
Location
77 Sunset Lane.
TapeOp is another great trade mag
-d.

i agree TapeOP is a great publication! what's not to like? it's free!! i actually wish everyone here at RO would subscribe and read it. it would open some eyes for sure!

what i enjoy about TapeOP, it is geared towards the actual people who are "in the trenches" doing actual production rather than towards the sales and marketing types for large scale manufacturers who are doing large scale production offshore or large retail outlets like Sweetwater. You will notice a distinct lack of Sweetwater advertising in TapeOp.

i surmise that is one of the reasons TapeOp is perceived as being tilted towards analog, the reason being people who are actually making real records (backed by labels, major distribution and sales) use analog (consoles and tape) more than the powers that be would like the general public to know. There's no money in hawking old used analog gear. They are way to invested in pushing software, plug ins and hardware to run it, all which by the way has a comparably short shelf life when compared to quality analog equipment.

It's an easy sell too. Lot's of people want to hear they can do things on the cheap. no one wants to be told that it's very expensive to accomplish a goal. It's easy to lead them down the garden path to the kool aide.
 

pcrecord

Quality recording seeker !
Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 21, 2013
Location
Quebec, Canada
@Henry Turner Ward ;
Most of us dream of the gear only the elite can afford.
But if you get a little mixer or an audio interface to record your stuff and learn, having knobs or not won't stop you from learning what gain staging or an EQ or a compresor is.
Those are universal audio knowledge that will always be true regardless of the gear you use ;)

Focusrite.png
 
Joined
Nov 24, 2017
Location
Hampshire, UK
@Henry Turner Ward ;
Most of us dream of the gear only the elite can afford.
But if you get a little mixer or an audio interface to record your stuff and learn, having knobs or not won't stop you from learning what gain staging or an EQ or a compresor is.
Those are universal audio knowledge that will always be true regardless of the gear you use ;)

View attachment 17854
Awesome! Is that your console?! Been signed up to UAudio for a while now, love their outboard equipment and plugins. Could you maybe suggest some sources for me to learn about gain staging? I have lots of texts books, one I'm loving right now is Carlos Lellis Ferreira's 'Recording', I have also read Bobby Owinski's series on Engineers (Mixing and Recording Handbook) and Dittmar's 'Audio Engineering 101'. I know it sounds unrealistic but I just want to learn as much as I can ("evil laugh"; nothing can stop me!) and if you can help me buy introducing the basics/ refer to some sources you used while starting out that'd be awesome! :D
 

DonnyThompson

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 25, 2012
Location
Akron/Cleveland, OH
Lol. Im sure Marco wouldn't mind if I jumped in here to tell you that this is not his console - no one here owns a desk like that.i agree with Kurt that TapeOp is a great mag, but he's our resident analog purist. There are plenty of big records being made in digital. Tracking analog is popular to be sure, but mixing is done in the box (ITB) by many big engineers, on many huge and successful records ...and I can also assure you that plenty of software is being used as well.
There's not a thing wrong with familiarizing yourself with analog. But few own the kind of gear that Marco posted the picture of. ;)
 

Davedog

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2001
Location
Pacific NW
@Henry Turner Ward ;
Most of us dream of the gear only the elite can afford.
But if you get a little mixer or an audio interface to record your stuff and learn, having knobs or not won't stop you from learning what gain staging or an EQ or a compresor is.
Those are universal audio knowledge that will always be true regardless of the gear you use ;)

View attachment 17854

Studio A @ Oceanway. The Rupert Neve designed ISA 110. One of 10 throughout the world.
 
Joined
Nov 24, 2017
Location
Hampshire, UK
Hiya chaps! @DonnyThompson , @miyaru, @pcrecord @Kurt Foster @Davedog! Been doing some intense revision since my last post/comment-
Focusing primarily on console types (in-line and split), console functions and the signal flow involved;
1. auxiliaries (pre/post/pre-cut etc)- perhaps give me a few examples of how you use PFL and AFL in everyday, studio scenarios?
2. inserts (acc. to outboard equipment/ overall processing effects whole selected channel)
3. fader section: (chan/ mixB, mute, solo types etc...),
...as well as just starting work on...
4. patch bays; (main functions, layout, normalising)
5. Routing matrix (acc. to group +/ main output busses and pan control)
6. master-section...
Now... breathe ;)
I'm fairly competent in my understanding of the input section (mic/line), EQ section, as well as dynamics (which I know in most consoles is not featured that much/ more insert sends to external/ outboards dynamic controls (like gates, expanders and compressors) but when available you can use to side chain signals etc)...
'????????????????????????????'
I guess what i'm asking is that... is this 'summed' (audio pun defiantly intended) up correctly, how'd you improve/ ammend some of the information and how can I learn to understand the numbered sections better (1. Auxes and their functions, 2. inserts and their functions, 3. fader section and their func... yeh you get the point). Would be really helpful if I can get some professional overview of my, admittedly, v. basic understanding of signal flow and i/o module basics. :)
 

Kurt Foster

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 2, 2002
Location
77 Sunset Lane.
just from reading your post i think you have a better grasp on it than you seem to think.

the thing is there really aren't any set in stone rules on how to use a console. it is best for you to just get a grasp on what each section does and then you get to decide how to use it.

AFL / PFL (after fader listen or pre fader listen respectively) are soloing functions. auxs can be sends for many things. pre sends usually go to monitors. (headphone system/ in ear/ wedges). post sends usually go to effects, reverbs/ delays/ flangers/ time shifting effects, but can also be employed to facilitate side chain or parallel compression or alternate mixes. however you really are only limited by your imagination.
 
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