Drum room advice

E

Eleganceofadream

Guest
Alright guys ive been reading these forums for maybe 2 yrs to gain advice which i have used. Im not recording from home in a room with the dimensions as follows 12 X 16 X 8 ft now im gonna be recording scratch guitar and drums on friday. Im wanting to get the best drum sound possible with this room. Any suggestions? Should i build like a small riser made of wood and put it under the kit to have some reflection. Its drywall with carpet in the room now. I can easliy put wood under the kit if needed? what about on the ceiling above the kit? or around it. Im just not to good with room acoustics yet. I know the ceiling is low and that sucks i could take a shotgun and blow some holes in the roof? =)
 

RemyRAD

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 26, 2005
Use all of the space you can. With low ceilings, I put my overhead further in front of or behind the drums rather than overhead. Just to get that space to improve the overall ambience. I wouldn't try to make things too dead as you will lose all of the drums presence.

If you are going to record and a small dead room full of drums, keep your microphones tight without too much elevation overhead and rely on your software/digital reverb's for artificial ambience.

Plenty of rock-and-roll hits in New York City were recorded in small bedroom/living room like environments and became well-known hits. This thanks to electronic week created ambience from EMT plate and/or digital reverb's from Lexicon and others. I've made plenty of recordings that way and people love the room sound from the space that had no room sound.

Don't try to put the drums in a telephone booth it will make the drummer uncomfortable.

Extremely comfortable in my 24 x 8 x 8 box
Ms. Remy Ann David
 

Cucco

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 8, 2004
Location
Tacoma, WA
I agree -

Don't worry about elevating the drums - the carpet does very little to detract from the drums (if anything it will tighten the kick by better coupling it to a solid surface.)

Get your overheads out in front of the kit a bit to avoid drums-too-close-itis and cymbal-overload-ism.
 
Top