Holy bleepin' Standing Waves!!!

Ethan Winer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2001
Location
New Milford, CT USA
Dan,

> any room will have problems with specific levels of energy at specific frequencies. I wonder (and I am not an acoustics guru) if the shotgun approach (everybody cover 3 walls and hope for the best) is going to leave some rooms with too much trapping at certain freqs and not enough at others - with the end result that the room response is different, but not necessarily better. <

For a control room you generally want to remove as much ambience as practical - but not to the point that it sounds like an anechoic chamber of course! Any ambience in the mixing room will confuse what you are hearing as you mix. That is, in an overly ambient room you'll think you have enough reverb on a track when in truth you have too little. Ambience also fosters flutter echoes when the room is small and/or the walls are parallel.

Especially in the bass region, you want to absorb as much as you can to minimize the problems caused by standing waves. It's not like you should leave out some absorption because "this room" needs more bass standing waves than another room. All standing waves are a problem because they change the low end balance depending on where you stand.

As Angelo mentioned elsewhere, some studio designers like to add deflectors as well as absorbers, since deflectors further help to minimize flutter echoes.

--Ethan
 
S

Southwind

Guest
Thanks one and all,

Here's where I'm at. Got the room re-oriented so that it is much more ergonomic/feels better. While there is better imaging over here and the low mids seam tighter, the 80hz thing is still there. However, the back wall is contiguous now and so far, untreated. Let the game begin.
First up, I think I'll try diffusion maybe mixed with some panel traps.
My only worry is that there is SO much going on right now. I amm starting an indi CD project very soon and am in the process of auditioning new gear (Distressors ROCK!). I guess I should really concentrate on the room first.

Thanks again,

Charles

P.S. Quick question. I see many floor plans that have the mix position in a corner. While this has always seamed "wrong" to me intuitively, obviously there are people doing this for a reason. I guess it would cut down on flutter as there are no parallel walls in front and behind you.....any thoughts?
 

Ang1970

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 5, 2000
Well, any flutter that was there before will still be there when you pivot into the corner. A more likely reason for doing this is to cut down on direct reflections from side walls. When the speakers are in the corner, reflections from the side walls will be directed toward the back of the room instead of the mix position.
 
L

lflier

Guest
Originally posted by Dan Popp:

Dear Lee,
Sorry, I don't "get" that philosophy. I have about 4k invested in acoustics in my small room.


Hmm. Which part of "I don't have 4K" do you not "get"? :)

The time savings alone of *not* wondering "is this really what I think I'm hearing?" is priceless.


I agree. However, 1) I do not have 4K, and 2) I don't believe it has to cost that much to get a room together where I can hear reasonably accurately.


--Lee
 
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lflier

Guest
Ethan,

I am wondering if I were to make some gobos after the fashion of your bass traps, if I could use them as gobos while tracking and put them behind my chair while mixing, instead of treating the whole room.

Eventually I would like to treat the whole room, but it will take time, and meanwhile I have mixes to finish up. I need to build some gobos anyway. Do you think this would be a good approach?

--Lee
 

Ethan Winer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2001
Location
New Milford, CT USA
Lee,

> I am wondering if I were to make some gobos after the fashion of your bass traps <

Sounds like a good idea to me. And it will probably work (even though I've never tried it). But consider this:

You want to keep the total surface area the same. So instead of 2x8-foot panels, make them 4x4 feet to not change the frequency ranges they act on. Also, make sure that one side (the "back") is as heavy and rigid as possible. Use at least a couple of sheets of 3/4 plywood, or maybe one sheet of plywood and two pieces of heavy sheetrock. It's important that only the plywood membrane vibrate, and not the back surface too.

You could also double up the high-bass traps, so they'll be a sandwich with vibrating plywood membranes on both sides, with a heavy non-flexing core in the middle.

This really sounds like a great idea. If it actually works let me know!

--Ethan
 
L

lflier

Guest
Ethan, this sounds great! Thanks for the suggestions - 4x4 was exactly what I was thinking, actually.

I'll bet if I put those babies in front of the drums during tracking I can get a FAT and tight as hell sounding drum kit, too! But the cymbals still ought to be high enough to reverberate nicely.

I am digging this idea more and more. I have a heck of a cold right now, but hopefully by the weekend I'll be able to get to work! Oh yeah, does Home Depot et al stock the Corning fiberglass panels or is there someplace else I have to go?

Thanks a million, again! I will be sure to let you know how it works out and hopefully post some pics.

--Lee
 
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