Skip to main content
Start a topic JOIN NOW!

My Quiet Recordings

Member for

15 years 5 months
Hey guys.

Im not part of a pro studio or anything. Im just trying to get the best recording i can out of my home setup.

So this little irritation of mine is when i record and get a decent mix, but you play another studio qualiity song and the volume levels are way up its just really in your face compared to mine.

Can anyone point me in the right direction about how to fix this....i have a feeling its in the mastering process but i just dont see how i can get it lounder with out clipping.

thanks =)

Comments

Member for

17 years 2 months

Massive Mastering Sun, 01/06/2008 - 18:49
Yes, to a very large extent, it's part of the mastering process.

but you play another studio qualiity song and the volume levels are way up its just really in your face compared to mine.
So if you go to a studio with a professional staff, track and mix there, then go to a professional mastering facility with a qualified engineer, you can be that loud too. Assuming the arrangements and core sounds allow it.

Making professional recordings doesn't happen by accident.

(Dead Link Removed)

Member for

13 years 6 months

cerberus Fri, 03/14/2008 - 19:46
xX5thQuarterXx wrote: Hey guys.

Im not part of a pro studio or anything. Im just trying to get the best recording i can out of my home setup.

So this little irritation of mine is when i record and get a decent mix, but you play another studio qualiity song and the volume levels are way up its just really in your face compared to mine.

Can anyone point me in the right direction about how to fix this....i have a feeling its in the mastering process but i just dont see how i can get it lounder with out clipping.

thanks =)
i think the problem may be that you are recording too hot into your digital
system; which would leave inadequate headroom for processing;
perhaps your transients are smeared and distorted?

in that case, when you attempt to peak limit, the distortion would get out
of control before the music seems loud enough, because you've
already over-distorted the very signal components that a
peak limiter is going to distort.

as i suggested at the head of the post, do not record hot. leave yourself 12-18db
of headroom going in. every top mix engineer and dsp designer is going
to agree. there's a strong technical foundation for this theory, and it
bears out in practice for those who would know. so i would
suggest to try it and reap the dynamic rewards.

jeff dinces

Member for

13 years 3 months

Cmac3469 Tue, 12/23/2008 - 05:49
What you can do is take your Master and render it as a wav file and add it as a new track in a new project in your recording software. Take your volume level and raise it to your desired level.
You just need to make sure you do not raise it up to a distorted level. This is what I do if the level is too low on some tracks.

Member for

13 years 6 months

cerberus Fri, 03/14/2008 - 20:38
that is what paul frindle and dan lavry had both suggested.
then those who followed that advice reported
positive results in their mixes.

i had argued for a lower noise floor, and greater resolution.
those guys used math to convince me that the analog
noise floor overwhelms my theoretical qualms. that
which i claimed to value was "bad noise".

i think it is perhaps a similar philosophy as could be applied to amp design;
clean, unfettered headroom; more than one might think,
is king if one desires a "loud" output.

i am not talking about mastering technique. but garbage in... likely you
would agree that if a mix is correct, then it shouldn't take much in
mastering to achieve an appropriate perception of loudness.

jeff dinces

Member for

21 years

Member Thu, 01/31/2008 - 12:37
I’m hoping that I don’t get flogged for adding my two cents here.

If you’re just working in a home set up and you want to add a little more “Umph” to your tracks, here are a few ideas you might want to use.

One thing I use quite a lot is something called “Ruby Tube” it’s available as a free .vst download from Silverspike.

http://www.silverspike.com/?Products:RubyTube

Just add a little “Medium Sparkle” to your mix and it warms it up nicely.

Also, have you normalized your mixdown track to its max peak value? I think a lot of DAW software has the option to do that.

Finally, you could add a very soft limiter to your mixdown track. Try compressing at a 1:infinite ratio above -3db and a 1:1 ratio below -3db with a 1db boost. I generally do this after normalizing a track. I have found that this adds the volume I want without sacrificing the overall dynamics of the track.

Keep in mind that these are things you want to use when you’re messing around at home or just making a simple demo. If you’re looking for a professional quality sound then there is no question that you should have a COMPETENT mastering engineer master your tracks. I farm out all my mastering to a guy I found in Miami who is in his late 70s and has forgotten more about audio engineering and mastering that most of us will ever know. I love how he is able to incorporate his “old school” knowledge and experience into modern technology.

Good luck!

Member for

17 years 2 months

Massive Mastering Mon, 01/14/2008 - 09:25
Roidster wrote: what......you guys dont use a little bit of reverb on your drums :roll:
Certainly. But don't you think that would be better applied during the mixing session instead of washing the whole mix in reverb? Not exactly what would be done during the mastering session (well, the occasional bad edit or cut tail perhaps, but it's pretty rare otherwise).
and im thinking that mastering isn't something that i could just pick up in a few months and do it myself am i right?
I don't think I've ever done this twice in the same thread...
(Dead Link Removed)

But let's make something perfectly clear again -- Mastering is NOT ABOUT MAKING EVERYTHING REALLY LOUD.

Just because it happens to be the stage where this happens to occur, it is NOT the goal. The goal is creating a compliant production master for replication that will translate to the widest possible array of playback options.

The "loud" part is an (unfortunate) afterthought.

As far as "learning it in a few months" -- I'll leave that to the horse.

Member for

19 years

Michael Fossenkemper Sat, 03/15/2008 - 05:13
Jeff,
I can see their point if one was working in the analog domain, but if say you have a mix captured, what would be the difference if you had 12db or 1 db of headroom? To me, not much as I always adjust the output before sending it out of the box. As long as you leave enough headroom to keep the peaks intact, which also means what the DAC and gear can handle, then why the rule?

Member for

13 years 6 months

cerberus Sat, 03/15/2008 - 07:10
michael;
i think it applies to a->d only. one may set d->a output levels by ear.
however it seems with a->d it needs a wider margin to be safe that
distortion will not be amplified later in the chain. iirc, the lower
bits of a 24 bit signal are said to exceed the dynamic range
of the analog stage, so there would be no program
material lost from using one or two fewer bits.

jeff dinces

Member for

15 years 6 months

rockstardave Mon, 01/07/2008 - 11:32
of course he says that you have to have it mastered... he runs a mastering company

now, he's absolutely right. pro recordings dont just Happen. but the average hobbyist isnt willing to spend hundreds of dollars to be a little bit louder.

what can you do? you'll probably take some of the life out of your tracks, but you could use some compression.

Member for

21 years

Member Sun, 01/27/2008 - 09:15
Perhaps a creative explanation would help.
Music is filled with Dynamics, ups and downs. It is an aesthetic choice on what to do with dynamics in your mix. Do you want the quiet parts to have signifigance?
The type of music also makes a difference. What is yours?
A Guitar Center Pro audio associate told me he uses The Finalizer.
Additionally, the Bit Depth is important here so record in 32 Bit Float.

Link for Finalizer, http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/Finalizer96/ with a $2,500 tag,
though it is only 96khz so it may not be best for those who use 192khz and want to put the audio on a DVD.

http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/Finalizer96/

Member for

17 years 6 months

Cucco Sun, 01/27/2008 - 11:24
filmmusic2008 wrote: Perhaps a creative explanation would help.
Music is filled with Dynamics, ups and downs. It is an aesthetic choice on what to do with dynamics in your mix. Do you want the quiet parts to have signifigance?
The type of music also makes a difference. What is yours?
A Guitar Center Pro audio associate told me he uses The Finalizer.
Additionally, the Bit Depth is important here so record in 32 Bit Float.

Link for Finalizer, http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/Finalizer96/ with a $2,500 tag,
though it is only 96khz so it may not be best for those who use 192khz and want to put the audio on a DVD.

http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/Finalizer96/

Dude - SERIOUSLY!

What is your deal? Everyone here slaps you around for your mis-statements and you just keep plugging away. Either you're a troll, or you're really mis-informed and obtuse!

First -
The finalizer is a device which makes the vast majority of mastering engineers CRINGE. Not because of what it can do (actually, it's a relatively powerful box in the right hands) but because what it USUALLY does. That is to say, in most peoples' hands, the finalizer is guilty for ruining MANY a mix by squashing the hell out of it and draining it of all its life.

Then - the whole DVD with 192kHz audio thing. Please pay attention to the following:

192kHz DOES NOT BELONG ON DVD. THE ONLY EXCEPTION TO THIS IS STRICTLY FOR 2-CHANNEL DVD-A. THIS DOES NOT APPLY TO DVD VIDEO OR ANY OTHER DVD FORMAT. ALSO, DVD-A REQUIRES A SPECIAL PLAYER TO PLAY BACK THE DATA STREAM AND IS A NICHE FORMAT AT BEST. YOUR MOM'S DVD PLAYER CAN'T PLAY DVD-A, NOR CAN MY MOM'S.


Now seriously, I don't care if the Tascam DVD-RA1000 can record in this format - it can also record in DSD. Are you proposing that everyone should/can work within this format as well?

Member for

21 years

Member Tue, 10/07/2008 - 17:48
hey yall im new here and just was looking for a site to help me in my "recording deal" and finally found it...anyway yeah so you guys are talking about how to make the the entire mix or master track louder, yeah i see how the mix, using reverb ( pretty smart by the way, setting wet all the way to 100%), and compression could play a role in making the signal stronger. But for instance im using protools m powered and you can only do so much to boost the signal with out it peaking and thats the thing to boost it WITH OUT PEAKING, i even have izotope on there that has a supposbably signal booster to amplify the track. but i see that the results are ok. i mean i compare it to other professial recordings and there is a difference. yeah i understand i that im not a professional and i dont have $10,000 equipment... is there any sofware out there specifically for boosting the mix to a significant amount with out peaking that i could get reasonably?

Tags