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One of my favorites

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10 months 3 weeks
 
Attached files whiter shade of pale.mp3 (7.4 MB) 

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Member for

15 years 7 months

Boswell Sun, 02/14/2021 - 05:03
That's a nice version, well done!

As constructive comment, the vocals are displaced to the right, which is rather disconcerting to the listener, as though any minute a second voice was going to come in to balance it on the left.

The other problem I had was that the very well played and recorded guitar has too much reverb added in the mix.This may just be a reverb type that has tails that are too long rather than its level being too high, but the result is that it feels as though the guitar and vocal are in different acoustic spaces. Maybe the thing to do is dial back on the reverb levels added to the individual guitar and vocal tracks, and then restore some of the lost reverb by adding it to the final mix, as that would give more cohesion. I don't think you need to keep the reverb level high just to impart more width to the image.

Member for

10 months 3 weeks

Bonecrusher1 Sun, 02/14/2021 - 11:46
Awesome... thank you.... unfortunately the reverb is burned in. I will re track it dry. Should vocals always be down the middle? And the guitar is left two clicks... is this okay? As far as reverb goes I’ve always loved the washed out sound ie: the flute in Glen Campbell “by the time I get to Phoenix” and dream pop and shoegaze

Member for

15 years 7 months

Boswell Sun, 02/14/2021 - 14:23
While it's merely convention that a single vocal track should be positioned centrally, you are perfectly entitled to be different. However, you may have to be prepared to defend yourself against the barrage of resulting comments!

The reverb is more a matter of style and production values, but these are based on opinion, not hard fact. What is fact, however, is that if you track with effects applied, you can't easily undo them.

Your performance is good - it would be well worth getting the recording up to a similar standard.

Member for

21 years 2 months

audiokid Sun, 02/14/2021 - 16:03
Words of advise there from, Bos. (y)

I’m a long time believer one common reverb goes a lot further than various rooms types fighting each other in a mix. Less reverb is more to my ears. I try and reproduce one room rather that trying to glue a bunch of rooms.
I know many people use a few different reverbs in a mix but to my ears... it causes all sorts of mix issues.
I also like to apply most reverbs on the sub mix or master buss as well. I find the master bus glues the room the best there.
But of course there are no rules as it’s a matter of tastes too. Sometimes we use gates etc on snares but that kind of falls into sound design IMO.

From a realistic POV, I try and reproduce a realistic space of musicians all playing together...

Member for

21 years 2 months

audiokid Sun, 02/14/2021 - 16:51
Kurt Foster, post: 467513, member: 7836 wrote:
there is a standard approach to reverbs that evolved in the 70'/80's which is to have 3 aux sends with aux 1 to a plate or chamber, aux 2 to a delay and aux 3 to a spatial time based effect like an Eventide.
IMHO, I used to use that formula years back but believe its a dated concept today. Of course this doesn’t mean I’m saying I’m right either.
I tend to use beat synced delays over multiple reverbs.
Multiple Reverbs/ tend to thin sound and cause that swirling effect.

Member for

19 years 4 months

Kurt Foster Sun, 02/14/2021 - 18:04
audiokid, post: 467514, member: 1 wrote:
Multiple Reverbs/ tend to thin sound and cause that swirling effect.
only if you don't run them 100% wet. the thinning and swirling are casued by the dry signal being run through the effect and then mixed back in. there's a slight latency introuced. running the reverb 100% wet remedies this.

Member for

21 years 2 months

audiokid Sun, 02/14/2021 - 18:04
For many years this is what I do a lot. If I was recording a group of guys on a porch I would record the porch with a very nice stereo mic. My preference has always been a Royer SF 24 but those are pricey. There are many options from a stereo mic to some LDC.

Then use that track in a mix, blend to taste. Works great ;)
Or exactly what Boulder just said (y)

Member for

21 years 2 months

audiokid Sun, 02/14/2021 - 18:06
Kurt Foster, post: 467517, member: 7836 wrote:
only if you don't run them 100% wet. the thinning and swirling are casued by the dry signal being run through the effect and then mixed back in. there's a slight latency introuced. running the reverb 100% wet remedies this.
I always (well usually) run reverb effect 100% wet.
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