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Akai unlocks MPC Software (v2.2) for all controllers

Check it out.


The MPC Software main page.
http://www.akaipro.com/products/software/mpc-software


The new features in 2.2
http://www.akaipro.com/


I bought this yesterday, having been planning on the MPC Studio hardware for some time, I can’t wait to move some air with these sounds! The AKAI stuff is the last part of my virtual drum machine collection for now. I sprung for the iphone app too, lol. GAS tank empty.

Beyond the sample set, the software looks to make quick, clean, work of drastic time and pitch altering, and making your own samples. Very cool. Seems super creative with those processes, which can be a tedium in other programs.

Comments

kmetal Sun, 05/13/2018 - 16:40
http://www.akaipro.com/pages/mpc-2.2-desktop-software-firmware-update

For existing owners, I’m not sure the $99 is worth it. Some of it seems like features that ‘should’ be standard imho. I could see where the addition of audio tracks could be useful, even if you are working within another daw. It runs as a VSTI now if I understand correctly or maybe it can just host vsti’s within the MPC software. Not sure if it’s both, I know it hosts vsti and other plugs. I can see it being a toss up for existing owners. It also makes MPC software compatible with all midi controllers, not just the MPC/Akai brands.

For someone who’s not an owner yet. $99 is a steal for the MPC soundset, imho. To have true licensed MPC samples is like burnt sienna to a painter, especially if involved in anything headed for mass listening. There’s more to the ‘real hardware’ MPC than just the digital samples, both in workflow, and analog section, that im guessing make it desirable. That aside, an authentic sample set, and the real-time pitch manipulation was worth the entry cost. The ability to host 3rd party plugs and do audio are gonna keep my sessions organized better I think, with way less clutter and responsibilities pinned on my main daw pc.

It Seems like a nice bridge between software, hardware, and daw. I’m planning on MPC controller for playing, and an SR-16, and to trigger my samples, and parts. Maybe is was just a first impression, but the pith and time was remarkably arftifact free. Changing time without effecting pitch, and vice versa. And you can manipulate it with a knob and fader.

It should make sequencing to live material sound smoother. Like programming strings behind a band that recorded live. The daw can set the conductor track to follow the swings, and I think the MPC software algorithm is going to allow to more transparent layering of audio samples and midi. Just a hunch I haven’t tested anything yet.


I was curious how you implemented the MPC/software into your particular rig and workflow. Before I purchased the software I looked at several threads where you speak highly of the MPC stuff.

audiokid Sun, 05/13/2018 - 17:45
kmetal, post: 456971, member: 37533 wrote: I hope more ‘rock guys’ like me open their mind up to electronic mixing styles, and music. There’s true art and soul that can be created. It’s amazing how ‘still’ some of the rock mixes seem, especially mine, relative to some of the other stuff I’ve been listening to lately.
IMO every studio (old school or current) should have at least one MPC in there arsenal and know what they are all about, what the sounds are and how much of an impact they have had for, musicians, writers, producers, recordists, mixers and DJ's . I have made hundreds of thousands of dollars because of an MPC so to all that are still back in the stone ages... MPC gear is absolute wow to me and to most that know what the sequencers can do.

kmetal, post: 456970, member: 37533 wrote: http://www.akaipro.com/pages/mpc-2.2-desktop-software-firmware-update
I was curious how you implemented the MPC/software into your particular rig and workflow. Before I purchased the software I looked at several threads where you speak highly of the MPC stuff.

Yah, you understand it. I have the Rennaisance, which is really cool. It syncs super tight to my DAW and yes, you can use its as a VSTi or a drum machine controller. I like how you can have it as an independent sequencer while in sync with your DAW timeline. You can open it up as a plugin and actually bounce the audio lanes of the MPC into your DAW session too. It makes writing very easy and fun. The library is excellent.

To answer your question, when I'm writing I usually start out with a beat so I will lay down a simple 4 bar track and let that loop. The MPC will loop while you are building a session in your DAW (samplitude as an example) It slaves perfectly. Once I have a song completed, I will play the drum parts to the session in real time. Its brilliant software.

My version of MPC was in need of some updates to fix a few bugs.

Oh ya... the sampling and time stretches etc is so cool. And its mxer is excellent as well.

I really want the MPC X. Its on my list of gear to get next.

audiokid Sun, 05/13/2018 - 17:56
PS,

The more I use a DAW the more I like independent hardware that "syncs" tight with a DAW. Good implementation of outboard gear reduces DAW bloat, and all that goes with having too many things running on one computer. The MPC does still use the same computer your DAW is on but it miraculously seems to stream along pretty well.

Now the new MPX X appears to be a whole new animal which I am expecting is like the original MPC 60 standalone. A stand-alone MPC drum machine is my answer to 20 years of waiting. If it does what I think it does... we are entering a hybrid area of the 80's. The days when midi actually worked and you could get shit done without all the stupid software problems we have had to suffer with for years now.

audiokid Sun, 05/13/2018 - 18:00
I'm thinking the 2.2 software is just like having the MPC X without the controller. kmetal . One of the coolest parts to MPC's are the actual controllers so if you can get your hands on a used Renaissance or Studio... do it. A drum controller is way cooler than just using some keyboard or pads. People that usually use keyboards to trigger drums are cheating themselves out of know how real and fun programming is and can be.

The X is a very solid hub to a studio production system.

kmetal Sun, 05/13/2018 - 18:10
audiokid, post: 456972, member: 1 wrote: IMO every studio (old school or current) should have at least one MPC in there arsenal and know what they are all about, what the sounds are and how much of an impact they have had for, musicians, writers, producers, recordists, mixers and DJ's . I have made hundreds of thousands of dollars because of an MPC so to all that are still back in the stone ages... MPC gear is absolute wow to me and to most that know what the sequencers can do.

Well put.

audiokid, post: 456973, member: 1 wrote: The MPC does still use the same computer your DAW is on but it miraculously seems to stream along pretty well.

This is exactly what I was hoping. To bridge the transitions (sync) between film, audio, midi, and remote control. The audio to midi capabilities of BFd, drumagog, and samplitude, allow you to use pretty much any sound you have as a trigger. There’s a plug-in for guitar that lets you trigger your vsti by your guitar witkout a midi pickup, with low latency.

audiokid Sun, 05/13/2018 - 18:16
What many people don't know is you can actually control acoustic music and vocals (acoustic lanes) into these units and mix tracks way cooler than you can in a DAW. Once you become familiar with something like these, it opens up a world of mixing like you never thought was possible. Thus.. ah... thats how they do it ;)

audiokid Sun, 05/13/2018 - 18:18
kmetal, post: 456975, member: 37533 wrote: Well put.



This is exactly what I was hoping. To bridge the transitions (sync) between film, audio, midi, and remote control. The audio to midi capabilities of BFd, drumagog, and samplitude, allow you to use pretty much any sound you have as a trigger. There’s a plug-in for guitar that lets you trigger your vsti by your guitar witkout a midi pickup, with low latency.
Yup. I use my MPC to trigger BFD as well. Works great.

audiokid Sun, 05/13/2018 - 18:30
audiokid, post: 456974, member: 1 wrote: I'm thinking the 2.2 software is just like having the MPC X without the controller. kmetal . One of the coolest parts to MPC's are the actual controllers so if you can get your hands on a used Renaissance or Studio... do it. A drum controller is way cooler than just using some keyboard or pads. People that usually use keyboards to trigger drums are cheating themselves out of know how real and fun programming is and can be.

The X is a very solid hub to a studio production system.

See what you can do with 2.0 from 20 min mark on. Work at things in the studio, then import the audio into the MPC. I would then use this for gigging, busking etc along with my playing guitar and vocals. Then go back into the studio and continue with producing etc. Very very cool.

audiokid Sun, 05/13/2018 - 18:43
This is is how I used to play and (god willing) want to get back into it again. Even if I never get back to where I was, I would use an MPC as a background beat and jam along like this for hours blowing people away. I used make money doing this back in the 80's/ 90's. It was so fun just playing along to a beat that never complained lol.

So to expand on how I would use it, would be like this as well as techno...:

kmetal Sun, 05/13/2018 - 19:00
audiokid, post: 456974, member: 1 wrote: One of the coolest parts to MPC's are the actual controllers

Yeah I’m planning on one of the flagship models at the time. First was software, next is computers, then the controllers. Imho the MPC is a classic just like a moog or fairlight, et al.

I like analog hardware because you can touch it, I like digital because you don’t necessarily have to touch it.

audiokid, post: 456980, member: 1 wrote: Oh Kyle, you have me drooling over MPC lol.

You and me both man!

audiokid, post: 456981, member: 1 wrote: This is is how I used to play and (god willing) want to get back into it again. Even if I never get back to where I was, I would use an MPC as a background beat and jam along like this for hours blowing people away. I used make money doing this back in the 80's. It was so fun.

So to expand on how I would use it, would be like this:


That’s sick. I was so clumsy with my previous setup for various reasons, I never really made good use of digital backing tracks, especially the drums. When im riffing I want to lay the drums down. I just didn’t do well w the pencil tool, or basic midi keyboard controller. It wasn’t inspiring.

How do you know it was the 80’s?

‘Cuz I was making lot of money in the music industry’

I just want to be able to pull up to a lake, or sing into my phone, and start developing in the moment. With the studio, the goal is always on, always record ready. Like Prince who’s famous for wanting everything mic’d up and ready before the session started.

audiokid Sun, 05/13/2018 - 19:33
kmetal, post: 456982, member: 37533 wrote: How do you know it was the 80’s?

‘Cuz I was making lot of money in the music industry’
I toured from 1981 to 1998 and during that time I used an MPC 60 every day. I earned a good living playing and singing back then. Is that what you are asking me to elaborate?

So, even though those days are gone, I still would love to get my chops back up and use an MPC to accompany me. I love jamming to beats and bass lines. Makes practicing fun. MPC's make it easy to figure out verses and chorus to things you get from jamming. The odd time I came up with some good hooks. As you get proficient with the software, you learn how to quickly add lib, get creative on the fly and if you are smart... stored your stuff on the MPC as seen in that MPC demonstration (20 min mark).

kmetal Mon, 05/14/2018 - 07:16
audiokid, post: 456984, member: 1 wrote: I toured from 1981 to 1998 and during that time I used an MPC 60 every day. I earned a good living playing and singing back then. Is that what you are asking me to elaborate?

I was just generally joking around about the current times of the industry (360 deals, YouTube ads, Ect).

For some reason, I was under the impression that you were a keyboard player and guitar player in bands during that time period. I didn’t realize you used the MPC daily. My exposure to the MPC was always at GC and with hip hop related clubs and artists. I had never looked at it as much more than that until very recently.

kmetal Mon, 05/14/2018 - 07:37
All sorts of cool factoids on the wiki. I didn’t know Roger Linn designed it. Considering the cd came out commercially in like 82’, it’s pretty sweet to have had a porysble machine with 12bit, 40khz sampling capability. Funny they still sell in the 1300-2k range, amazing.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Akai_MPC

These machines are intriguing. Is this the one you had? audiokid



audiokid Mon, 05/14/2018 - 07:45
kmetal, post: 456987, member: 37533 wrote: I was just generally joking around about the current times of the industry (360 deals, YouTube ads, Ect).

For some reason, I was under the impression that you were a keyboard player and guitar player in bands during that time period. I didn’t realize you used the MPC daily. My exposure to the MPC was always at GC and with hip hop related clubs and artists. I had never looked at it as much more than that until very recently.
When I was a little kid I used to jam to a Hammond Organ rhythm section.

I've been interested in synths my whole life so I've always used them but I am not a keyboard player, however, I am a good programmer and can fumble my way around the keys to where I can usually pick out every part of a song and program it all into a MPC per-say. I became so good at it to a point I invested in a full PA and light system, bought racks of keyboards, put together a playlist and was hired to play rock and dance clubs.

I would rock it out as a guitar player. I learned to jam with my midi rig. I got to a point where I could switch drum and sequencer patterns by foot switch or midi keyboard commands to do anything I wanted via sequencer automation or simply manually commands reaching over to a keyboard note to change patterns that I knew fit for a particular riff I wanted. Multitasking / playing, singing and using midi instruments in real time to create music is not a problem for me. Thus I became good enough at this to make a career out of it. I have always used electronics as part of my workflow.

I have always used drum machines for metronomes and as they evolved, so did my use of them. I've been using MPC 60's since their launch and before that I used Linn and Roland drum machines. Thats how it all evolved for me.

audiokid Mon, 05/14/2018 - 07:50
kmetal, post: 456988, member: 37533 wrote: These machines are intriguing. Is this the one you had? audiokid

Yes, I just tossed it into the trash as it finally was burned out completely. The sad part is all my work I did over the last 30 years was lost with it. Trying to transfer it all to a DAW today was way to daunting. The new MPC X looks to finally be the answer to what the MPC 60 was which is a stand alone midi production sequencer. Basically a very cool DAW that is designed to build music the way musicians and drummers think.

audiokid Mon, 05/14/2018 - 08:06
A DAW is really just a different kind of MPC and an"MPC 60" was really the first versions of a DAW. Other types of sampler sequencers of these early DAW's came as EMU Emulators, Fairlight, Synclavier.

Samplers are just cooler tape machines that can do a lot more with. Combine the two, give them midi control features and you basically have an MPC X. The MPC 60 and the NEW MPC X are ideal for musicians, recording studios, mixers and producers. They are very powerful secret weapons to say the least. :) They are what a calculator is to an accountant. What a set of knives and a counter-top is to a chef. What goes on in the back room where all the magic happens.

kmetal Mon, 05/14/2018 - 08:23
audiokid, post: 456989, member: 1 wrote: I've been interested in synths my whole life so I've always used them but I am not a keyboard player, however, I am a good programmer and can fumble my way around the keys to where I can usually pick out every part of a song and program it all into a MPC per-say. I became so good at it to a point I invested in a full PA and light system, bought racks of keyboards, put together a playlist and was hired to play rock and dance clubs.

I would rock it out as a guitar player. I learned to jam with my midi rig. I got to a point where I could switch drum and sequencer patterns by foot switch or midi keyboard commands to do anything I wanted via sequencer automation or simply manually commands reaching over to a keyboard note to change patterns that I knew fit for a particular riff I wanted. Multitasking / playing, singing and using midi instruments in real time to create music is not a problem for me. Thus I became good enough at this to make a career out of it. I have always used electronics as part of my workflow.

That’s really cool.

audiokid, post: 456990, member: 1 wrote: Yes, I just tossed it into the trash as it finally was burned out completely. The sad part is all my work I did over the last 30 years was lost with it. T

Man that is rough to hear.

audiokid Mon, 05/14/2018 - 09:09
To elaborate on the CV controls.

Think of those rotary knobs as a hands on mouse that will attenuate +- values of a curve > examples: volume, envelop filters, actual lighting for a light show, and so on. Grab and twist lol! Anything that accepts a midi or CV control can be assigned to be controlled by those knobs or pads.

Keep in mind how you can import audio track (this means not just synth sounds but vocals and acoustic tracks) into the MPC 2.0 and then use CV controls to do very cool commands that can be saved into a timeline just like a DAW lane but with a more tactile way to program, edit,, filter, curve, time stretched etc.

audiokid Mon, 05/14/2018 - 10:15
kmetal, post: 456971, member: 37533 wrote: I hope more ‘rock guys’ like me open their mind up to electronic mixing styles, and music. There’s true art and soul that can be created. It’s amazing how ‘still’ some of the rock mixes seem, especially mine, relative to some of the other stuff I’ve been listening to lately.

audiokid, post: 456972, member: 1 wrote: IMO every studio (old school or current) should have at least one MPC in there arsenal and know what they are all about, what the sounds are and how much of an impact they have had for, musicians, writers, producers, recordists, mixers and DJ's . I have made hundreds of thousands of dollars because of an MPC so to all that are still back in the stone ages... MPC gear is absolute wow to me and to most that know what the sequencers can do.

Yah, you understand it. I have the Renaissance, which is really cool. It syncs super tight to my DAW and yes, you can use its as a VSTi or a drum machine controller. I like how you can have it as an independent sequencer while in sync with your DAW timeline. You can open it up as a plugin and actually bounce the audio lanes of the MPC into your DAW session too. It makes writing very easy and fun. The library is excellent.

To answer your question, when I'm writing I usually start out with a beat so I will lay down a simple 4 bar track and let that loop. The MPC will loop while you are building a session in your DAW (samplitude as an example) It slaves perfectly. Once I have a song completed, I will play the drum parts to the session in real time. Its brilliant software.

My version of MPC was in need of some updates to fix a few bugs.

Oh ya... the sampling and time stretches etc is so cool. And its mixer is excellent as well.

I really want the MPC X. Its on my list of gear to get next.

Those looking from the outside in on what "drum machines" are all about.. there are two kinds of drum machines,

  1. Beat boxes

  2. Stand alone, sampler/ sequencer, controllers designed like drum machines with pads and CV controller that have DAW software and memory.
    class="xf-ul"> If you are part of the drum machine resistance, you are very likely more often than not blinded by your first and most obvious impression as to what a rudimentary and stock "drum machine" and its programmers work sounds like. Example: hip hop artists, big bass dance and electronic music where drums are not intended to be much more than a back beat.

    What the resistance don't see and hear are examples from those who know how to use these beasts in other musical production projects. The best of the best composers do not always make an MPC sound like a rhythm box ;) And mixers who use these can take a boring and out of time mix and turn it into wow so fast, it's nothing short of... OMG, that's how they do that! ;)

    I used to chuckle back in the day when I first started RO (1998). I had come from a 20 year music career, had at least 10,000 hours into programming and using these computers. Unfortunately I could never "comfortably" talk about how recordist and their artists could use an MPC as tools (an instrument) and how recordist could sync these to further controllers in a SMPTE chain, tape machines including Pro Tools and other DAW's that accepted MTC, SMPTE, CV.
    They are a wonderful composing tool for any pro active studio that wants to offer more ways to skin the cat.

    Very few recordist here were openly aware of how powerful the MPC > digital recording and editing devices were for musicians, recordist and mixers.
    (Well at least those who knew never admitted it publicly).

    Out of laziness more than anything, I've basically kept my lips sealed on all this here (we are a recording forum) but occasionally when someone chimes (y) I'm more than thrilled to share what I know about them.

    All in all... negativity we hear from the drum machine resistance likely come from those who got there because:
    • they tried the cheap stuff and it sounded cheap
    • they couldn't understand it all, it has nothing to do with mics and recording

    • they think these are only for electronic geeks
    • they couldn't be bothered.
    • they are afraid it is a threat
    class="xf-ul"> A usual indication of the resistance says... "you can always tell a drum machine when you hear one".

    Fact: How they sound is because that's how it was programmed. They are DAW's > dedicated recording devices > digital audio workstations that can also send and receive many midi channels that can be assigned to control an entire production. Its that simple.

    These controllers are very sophisticated tactile tools dedicated for building and organizing audio tracks quickly and spontaneously.

kmetal Wed, 05/16/2018 - 07:00
Eh fuck the resistance. There’s no place in art for that eleistist, egocentric, attitude. Those people are usually has beens, close cigars, or just ingnorant.

This MPC setup is rediculously powerful. For instance, i can set up sessions in the MPC 2.0, hosting dozens of my VSTI, and then open them it as a Single channel, in the Daw. Beautiful. all my moogs. Done. One click. 2 dozen classic drum machines. Done. All in perfect sync, instantly recalllable.

Pad folding- in my daw workflow, I have a separate track lane for each sample, (kik for instance) then bus them to a mono kik bus. It adds up quickly. It’s way to have over a dozen tracks just for kick and snare. Trigger tracks, midi/instrument, busses. With MPC I can assign several samples to one pad/midi note, in one or two clicks/presses. Killer.

Channel switching on the avid eleven I believe can be midi controlled. So I can program the changes, printing re-amped tracks with different sounds, on the same track.

In like a literal minute, I recorded myself snapping, trimmed it, and assigned it to a pad, and played along to a beat, right in the MPC app.

My mind has been going wild with ideas for this thing. I’m hoping to pickup my speakers at the fedex today, and put the MPC software and the speakers thru the ringer. Might be time to unbox my little 10” portable subwoofer. Kik kik boom!!

I hope you share any and all of your techniques and experiences. There’s a wealth of information to be had there.

kmetal Wed, 05/16/2018 - 18:36
Picked up the speakers a few minutes ago. Seems like cheeeburgers are always smaller than the photo implies, and speakers are bigger, much bigger than the photo suggests. Lol. Haven’t taken them out of the shipping box yet. Gonna see if I can mickey mouse some cabling together tonight possibly. A pair of Alesis monitor one mk3’s, excited to hear what these little guys can do. The mk2’s are one of my favorite speaker, but discontinued. No expectations for the mk3, just curiosity. Can’t wait to blast 808, 4 on the floor, with the MPC and little speakers & sub.

audiokid Sat, 05/19/2018 - 10:55
I'm excited to hear all of what you think about MPC 2.2.

To expand on the MPC hardware. One of the coolest features of MPC hardware ( I'm assuming the new MPC hardware is the same) enables real time triggering which includes the use of mics. Having a real drummer trigger the MPC is dope. Using pre recorded tracks to trigger the MPC is dope. Turning real time tracks into midi tracks that can trigger the MPC software is serious dope.

Drummers who use an MPC to work with or o use an MPC to collaborate with other studios... is a really good thing.

As an example for my lake home studio... I will source out real drummers like Marco to play drums for the songs I am producing here. I send Marco a song with a scratch track of what my client wants. Marco lays down real drums and sends it back to me. We may or may not use some or all of his drum sounds but we will use his performance and pay him for that.
We may keep hats or a snare or even augment his sound with MPC sounds as well. We simply use Marco's performance to trigger the MPC library.

All clients can sit in on the mix and choose what drums fit best for them. Win win for everyone.

kmetal Sat, 05/19/2018 - 14:52
audiokid, post: 457033, member: 1 wrote: I'm excited to hear all of what you think about MPC 2.2.

To expand on the MPC hardware. One of the coolest features of MPC hardware ( I'm assuming the new MPC hardware is the same) enables real time triggering which includes the use of mics. Having a real drummer trigger the MPC is dope. Using pre recorded tracks to trigger the MPC is dope. Turning real time tracks into midi tracks that can trigger the MPC software is serious dope.

Drummers who use an MPC to work with or o use an MPC to collaborate with other studios... is a really good thing.

As an example for my lake home studio... I will source out real drummers like Marco to play drums for the songs I am producing here. I send Marco a song with a scratch track of what my client wants. Marco lays down real drums and sends it back to me. We may or may not use some or all of his drum sounds but we will use his performance and pay him for that.
We may keep hats or a snare or even augment his sound with MPC sounds as well. We simply use Marco's performance to trigger the MPC library.

All clients can sit in on the mix and choose what drums fit best for them. Win win for everyone.

MPC is the shit man. I can’t believe I’ve been missing out on it. Drummagog replaces in real-time, and host vsti, and sends midi. It takes a powerful machine to run all that. I’ve always loved how streamlined all-in-one recorders, tablets, and the MPC can be, while being reliable and doing difficult tasks. I can’t say I’ve feel confident using the computer based thing live. Something like the MPC really stands up to the task with no Bs. When i did a well known hip hop artists live sound, the dj came in with a white machine, maybe an MPC, it was old. The DJ said ‘what’s his face doesn’t care, this thing has all his beats. I think it was on the rom or floppy drive, I can’t remember. But he pressed a button and played the entire backing track. I remember going crazy because the newer the song, the louder it was, and he was mixing back and forth. I had no compressor or sound check, so did my best riding the gain knob on the house mixer.

The workflow you describe with drums, is exactly how I see all instruments. Between DI, and triggers, and the high level of transparency between audio and midi.

One thing about the MPC i noticed at GC whenever I’ve mashed around on it, was the solid feel. It feels like it was made to be played. That’s another difference between a drum machine and the MPC. The SR-16 is a fun little thing, I like it, but it doesn’t have the feel of an instrument, which is fine, it’s part of its charm. But when you crack the MPC it doesn’t move.

The instant gratification of an all in one unit vs the vsti/controller just isn’t equaled yet, in my limited experience at least. The MPC hardware does have some limitations but creatively it’s much more seamless, from afar at least. It seems to me the software/brains of the MPC are only a part of what it’s about.

audiokid Sat, 05/19/2018 - 16:29
kmetal, post: 457034, member: 37533 wrote: MPC is the $*^t man. I can’t believe I’ve been missing out on it. Drummagog replaces in real-time, and host vsti, and sends midi. It takes a powerful machine to run all that. I’ve always loved how streamlined all-in-one recorders, tablets, and the MPC can be, while being reliable and doing difficult tasks. I can’t say I’ve feel confident using the computer based thing live. Something like the MPC really stands up to the task with no Bs. When i did a well known hip hop artists live sound, the dj came in with a white machine, maybe an MPC, it was old. The DJ said ‘what’s his face doesn’t care, this thing has all his beats. I think it was on the rom or floppy drive, I can’t remember. But he pressed a button and played the entire backing track. I remember going crazy because the newer the song, the louder it was, and he was mixing back and forth. I had no compressor or sound check, so did my best riding the gain knob on the house mixer.

The workflow you describe with drums, is exactly how I see all instruments. Between DI, and triggers, and the high level of transparency between audio and midi.

One thing about the MPC i noticed at GC whenever I’ve mashed around on it, was the solid feel. It feels like it was made to be played. That’s another difference between a drum machine and the MPC. The SR-16 is a fun little thing, I like it, but it doesn’t have the feel of an instrument, which is fine, it’s part of its charm. But when you crack the MPC it doesn’t move.

The instant gratification of an all in one unit vs the vsti/controller just isn’t equaled yet, in my limited experience at least. The MPC hardware does have some limitations but creatively it’s much more seamless, from afar at least. It seems to me the software/brains of the MPC are only a part of what it’s about.
Right on, Kyle. Welcome to the world of MPC. You are going to be so inspired with all this!
I hope you can save up and get the hardware because it’s really like you said.... they are an instrument in itself.
I’ve used them so much that they are the ineffable tool to everything timing and track construction, always sitting beside me, live or studio, 37 years and counting.

kmetal Sun, 05/20/2018 - 12:23
audiokid, post: 457035, member: 1 wrote: Right on, Kyle. Welcome to the world of MPC. You are going to be so inspired with all this!
I hope you can save up and get the hardware because it’s really like you said.... they are an instrument in itself.
I’ve used them so much that they are the ineffable tool to everything timing and track construction, always sitting beside me, live or studio, 37 years and counting.

Thanks, this should be fun. The MPC hardware is on the list, likely about 3 years, when i do my first order of flagship stuff. I’m gonna work with the software/MPC controller for now, which is a different animal, but makes sense for my situation in this short term.

I also figured out the iPhone sounds different if you use the lightening to 1/8”, as opposed to the regular 1/8” headphone jack. It’s a noticeable improvement. I think they addressed this in the later versions of the iPhone, mine is a 6. You can’t charge the phone while using the port for the audio plug too. Whatever, sounds better on battery, worth the improvement.

Anyway, next step is the install and registration for me. Another thing the hardware has going for it. Power on, GO!!

audiokid Fri, 05/25/2018 - 16:40
Finally read the UA info on preamps. Good read. Here is the bit on MPC and samples I thought was interesting.

How the Pros Choose Microphone Preamps


Young Guru

The engineer of choice for Jay-Z, Common, and more, Young Guru has been dubbed “the most influential man in hip-hop that you’ve never heard of,” by the Wall Street Journal.

Are preamps as valuable a tool for line-level sources like samples, synths and beats as they are for miked sounds?
Guru: Absolutely. I come from the era where DJs always played and sampled a vinyl record through a DJ mixer, which is, in essence, just another preamp. These days, producers are doing a lot of that type of sampling work with an MPC or by downloading samples online, but I still want to give those sounds some sort of harmonic character, so it still has the feel and the warmth of when we all ran vinyl through a mixer.

I’ll often run synth and sound samples through the Neve 1073, especially when I don’t necessarily want to use EQ, but I want to give the sample some real presence and body. I’ll turn the input of the preamp way up, and bring the output down to keep the level correct. This gives the sound a lot of presence and character.

For drum samples specifically, I’m more likely to use an API and I’ll take advantage of the multiple outputs on an MPC to individually dial in the preamp sound for kick, snare, hats, and everything else.

Joel Hamilton
A Grammy and Latin Grammy-nominated Brooklyn-based producer, engineer, musician, and co-owner of Studio G Brooklyn, Hamilton’s CV features credits with Tom Waits, Highly Suspect, Pretty Lights, Sparklehorse, and The Black Keys.


Joel Hamilton: I like the SSL preamps on anything that’s already line level, like a drum machine. The SSL just has a way of carrying that sort of idiom, anything from a Janet Jackson or En Vogue record, where you want that perfect ’80s or ’90s R&B snare that just “splats” so well, that Timbaland-type of snare.

Working with all the electronic acts that I do, that type of SSL sound is crucial for me. Now, the artist may have created those sounds in Ableton or on an MPC, but I color it with the SSL for that modern analog vibe, and it gives it that correct, big-studio sound. The SSL is a great finisher.

— James Rotondi

Tony Carpenter Mon, 05/28/2018 - 08:18
I have native instruments Maschine mk1 with version 2.x software. Very powerful I’m sure. Honestly though, I bought it initially thinking I would use it for manual beats. With getting first BFD3 and now SD3 I’m seeing just sitting there. I used to play beats live on my keyboard keys... guess I’m just a dinosaur.

Tony

audiokid Mon, 05/28/2018 - 09:59
Maschine is okay, MPC controllers are my preferred way to program drums and the new MPC X looks to be even more amazing.

MPC's are a more natural organic way to program music apposed to other boxes. Maschine to me always has a techno feel. MPC on the other hand would be imho, the mix engineer/ producer choice sequencer because its not just a beat box, its a midi hub with amazing editing capabilities and more. However, just like any (electronic or acoustic) tool, you either like it or you don't and that doesn't mean it makes something a good, better or best fit for everyone. Everything has a use in the creative world.

Being said though... Do not be disillusioned on this box... The MPC X is really a DAW. Its not just a beat box. Its a whole different animal.

kmetal Mon, 05/28/2018 - 11:31
In the UA article Young Guru brings up using the pre amp for warming up line level signals, which is awesome, because the pre’s don’t just sit there most of the time. Passive summit mixers let you make use of your pre amps gain staging too. This is starting to help confirm my notion to setup a couple reverb/re amp spots in the concrete basement, and one of the bathrooms of this house.

The sequencing and tempo manipulation on the MPC stuff really seems to make creative work of otherwise mundane tasks like that.

Programming the click was always one of the things I hated most in any DAW I’ve used. I always dreaded those days or sessions.

kmetal Mon, 06/11/2018 - 18:23
Ordered this wireless, mini MPC/midi controller today because the price was too good. Figured I’d spread the word. It’s back ordered, but whatever totally worth waiting for. Should be perfect for my battery powered portable rig. And certainly ideal for the iMPC iOS app I purchased.


Here’s the link to the product page:

http://www.akaipro.com/products/pad-controllers/lpd8-wireless



Here’s the link to the sale price:

https://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/LPD8BT--akai-professional-lpd8-wireless-pad-controller

kmetal Mon, 06/11/2018 - 19:12
audiokid, post: 457679, member: 1 wrote: wow, that's what you are talking about. Would that have latency?

Sorry i had to edit the product link, i accidentally linked the Akai homepage.

That’s one of them lol, till the space allows the big dog!!

Having not been able to find the latency specs in the manual, my presumption is the latency would reflect the connection which is BT 4.0, and usb 2.0. I’m also guessing latency is part of the reason for the sale price. I can’t tell if the wireless is only Mac/iOS compatible, forcing Wind users to be tethered. It seems to state both on the website.















Since it works both wireless and cabled up, I wasn’t super concerned w latency. Worse comes to worse I’ll program it to control plugins or vsti’s parameters. My guess is the wireless latency walks the line between torerable and a nuisance.
x

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