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Beyer M-88 Classic

Member for

21 years 2 months
any ever use the Beyer M-88 classic, what is it best suited for?

Comments

Member for

21 years 2 months

Pro Audio Guest Mon, 02/18/2002 - 15:35
I guess you are referring to the riedition made a while ago of the M88 (and M500). Two of the real "classic " mikes Beyer has ever built.
The " classic" comes in wooden box... and is 100%
similar to the original design/specs/look.
A collectors item...
The M88 is now called M88tg and is slightly different from the M88 due to a change of the upper and lower basket and a reinforcement done
in the internal schock-mount.
Besides that the new M88tg is exactly the same mike "on paper "...
Han is right about it is a wonderfull mike.
I own a pair and is still one of my fav for kick, and super on guitar amps.
You'll find more on Beyer web-site with many info
since is really an historic piece. Jo

Member for

20 years 9 months

drumsound Fri, 02/22/2002 - 20:20
Originally posted by Han:
Tony, talking about Beyer and snare, have you tried the M201 yet?
No, but I've heard good things. These days I'm using th ATM23he snare drum mic a lot and it's working for me. I usually mic the shell if I'm using a wood drum. I think I put up an M88 next time though.

Member for

20 years

Kev Sat, 02/23/2002 - 10:47

I like the M88 quite a bit, a very underrated and flexible mic. I could do a track with one and a small diaphragm condensor.
[/QB]
I agree...
I don't think it is so much underrated rather just forgotten.

In the early eighties it was a very talked about Mic. I guess it was the Phil Collins connection. That is when I bought one. It is a very tight pattern so the singer has to be a little more disciplined compared to using a 57/58 sort of thing. Good signal rejection makes it handy in some live situations.

One last word of advice. It is cool in a kick drum but don't let that give you a false sense of security ..... DON"T DROP IT ... it will stop working and the replacement capsule is expensive.

Member for

21 years 2 months

Pro Audio Guest Sat, 02/23/2002 - 13:09
Well not really forgotten around here...
I may add a few things.
The M 88 is really an almost condenser quality mike. Thanks also to the great ability to reproduce low frequencies does a beatifull job on kick, toms and whenever you need a full tone with clean mids. It can handle SPL up to 150 dB BUT be aware that higher pressure can cause premature
failure of the copper coil. Repair is expensive like Kev says. In simple words you should play a little bit of attention when you stick M88 inside the kick of an....Heavy Metal drummer in terms of placement ( just use common sense, usually the mike right on the..beater does not sound that good either) but nothing that can make your hands sweating.... and yes, don't drop it...
I've never had a problem. If you buy an used M88
( expecially one that has lived...on the road ) always make sure of its condition.
It's not your average dynamic mike..
It's also a great vocal mike ( that as usual depends from the voice. It cannot work for everybody ) and you'll find that is very sensitive
to P's and other blasting cons. almost as a condenser... Requires a very good mike technique from the vocalist. Can sound strange but in this the M500 is less problematic.
The M500 like Bear's said is a ribbon. BTW both M88 and M500 have Hypercardioid patterns.
The M500 was developed for a specific purpose.
Vocals. In particolar for live applications.
It has a rising high freq response so to help voice to "cut through " easily. Not a flat mike.
There are four stage integral blast filter. You can hold this mike and get close to grill as much
as you want. Danger of blast is really at min.
There is a foam pop filter right inside the grill. Since the grill can be unscrewed or untighten ( depends how old is the mike) sometimes
i take that off. But honestly is so trasparent that i can't hear a night and day difference.
Mike can handle a lot of SPL ( 130B) as well but its magic is in the tone ( also here it depends from voice ) and by the way it can be used outdoor is unaffected by atmospheric conditions.
One of the characheristic of ribbons is fast response to transients and sharp attacks.
In this sense the snare seems a nice place to place a ribbon... I would be more afraid of a stick shot then SPL. BUT with a proper placement i would suggest to take a ride.. . ....Hyper is pretty tight too. Jo
And again for those interested to know more about M 88 check Beyer web-site.....

Member for

21 years 2 months

Pro Audio Guest Fri, 03/01/2002 - 16:21
I got my M88 in my first microphone purchase, when I got all my drum mikes. I have yet to find a better sounding mike for kick drum - Beta 52 comes close, but doesn't have the midrange "punch" of the 88. The M88 combined with a Royer 121 on kick is the ultimate. (Good pre's help)

I must admit I have never used the M88 on snare... going to try this, as I am starting to tire of the sound of a 57.

Was "In The Air Tonight" vocal recorded on a M88? That is such an intimate vocal sound - what kind of preamp did they use?

Member for

20 years

Kev Sat, 03/02/2002 - 01:15
Originally posted by Han:

Have you dropped a (big) Neumann yet? :D [/QB]
Not a Neuman but an AKG414. I was on the my side of the glass ... I pushed to talk and said "be careful not to bump that mic stand" .... "What was that?"... as they spun around and down it went!

I kept my cool and walked out to make a coffee. I didn't get much work done that day. At the time it was my most expensive mic. It is not the Mic it was anymore.
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