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Help with low output signal.

Member for

4 years 4 months
I am trying to setup a youtube channel on the cheap and got a condenser mic and amp. I recorded with multiple programs all registering very low signal strength. How do I increase the signal strength of my recordings? The XLR output goes to my audio jack. I am using Windows 10, InnoGear 1- Channel 48V Phantom Power Supply with 10 Feet XLR Cable and Adapter, Excelvan BM-800 Condenser Studio Recording Microphone, Audacity for recording, and Realtek High Definition Audio driver. Realtek is configured to "line in" with "level" set to 100. When "mic in" is chosen the computer doesn't recognize the mic. Audacity recordings register below -50db. Please help! I have scoured countless youtube videos and forums to solve this myself. I just ordered a Sabrent USB External Stereo Sound Adapter for Windows in hopes that maybe it is an impedance issue but I really have no idea what I am doing. Thank you for any responses!

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Member for

7 years 5 months

DogsoverLava Sun, 07/09/2017 - 15:00
Austin, post: 451274, member: 50690 wrote: I am trying to setup a youtube channel on the cheap and got a condenser mic and amp. I recorded with multiple programs all registering very low signal strength. How do I increase the signal strength of my recordings? The XLR output goes to my audio jack. I am using Windows 10, InnoGear 1- Channel 48V Phantom Power Supply with 10 Feet XLR Cable and Adapter, Excelvan BM-800 Condenser Studio Recording Microphone, Audacity for recording, and Realtek High Definition Audio driver. Realtek is configured to "line in" with "level" set to 100. When "mic in" is chosen the computer doesn't recognize the mic. Audacity recordings register below -50db. Please help! I have scoured countless youtube videos and forums to solve this myself. I just ordered a Sabrent USB External Stereo Sound Adapter for Windows in hopes that maybe it is an impedance issue but I really have no idea what I am doing. Thank you for any responses!

I'll maybe let others address trouble shooting for you if there's anything to be done -- though your issue may be simply that the gear is too cheap or budget. Your mic lists for between $20-25 USD, and about the same for your phantom power unit. They just might not be up to the task. (hard to say). When I look at entry level stuff for what you want to do you'll find it costs about $200 bucks to get to where you want to be (using a proper interface and mic etc...) On the low end you have stuff like this focusrite bundle https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01E6T54E2/?tag=r06fa-20 Kind of an all-in-one starter package. As you have some of this stuff already you might just opt for an interface (so you can bypass using any on-board audio processing in your PC) I'd look at a gen2 Scalett 2i2 https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07229R7PP/?tag=r06fa-20

You might be able to find good deals on these in your local Craigslist. Here's a used gen1 for $50 in Milwaukee https://sheboygan.craigslist.org/msg/6162302424.html ----- Good luck. Maybe others can help you trouble shoot what you have further.

Member for

11 years 10 months

bouldersound Sun, 07/09/2017 - 22:13
You need a mic preamp with phantom power connected to an analog-to-digital converter and some way to connect it to a computer. A USB audio interface with XLR mic input does all that in one box. A USB mic does all that in one device. If you're recording music an interface is usually preferable. Either works okay for spoken word.

Member for

19 years 4 months

Kurt Foster Mon, 07/10/2017 - 15:50
bouldersound, post: 451283, member: 38959 wrote: You need a mic preamp with phantom power connected to an analog-to-digital converter and some way to connect it to a computer. A USB audio interface with XLR mic input does all that in one box. A USB mic does all that in one device. If you're recording music an interface is usually preferable. Either works okay for spoken word.
...... however don't be confused. yes a good interface would increase your quality significantly but for what you said you wanted to do coming out of a mic pre into the line in on your computer will work fine.

Member for

11 years 10 months

bouldersound Mon, 07/10/2017 - 15:57
Kurt Foster, post: 451289, member: 7836 wrote: ...... however don't be confused. yes a good interface would increase your quality significantly but for what you said you wanted to do coming out of a mic pre into the line in on your computer will work fine.

True, and it's entirely possible that a dynamic mic with the right adapting cable could be connected to the input with no other gear. There are several ways to solve this problem. A proper USB interface is the one that I find most attractive.

Member for

7 years 5 months

DogsoverLava Mon, 07/10/2017 - 17:17
bouldersound, post: 451290, member: 38959 wrote: True, and it's entirely possible that a dynamic mic with the right adapting cable could be connected to the input with no other gear. There are several ways to solve this problem. A proper USB interface is the one that I find most attractive.
That's why I recommended a used focusrite if he can find one - particularly if he's looking to do more. A 2i2 will give him 2 mic inputs if he gets into something like podcasting or recording conversations as opposed to just a single voice. Kurt's suggestion is still the winner in the sense it properly explained what he was missing -- basically a pre-amp. An interface is a preamp, a PC soundcard, and a recording I/O interface designed to give you a studio in a box. What I like about a good interface is that it basically replaces your soundcard on the MB of your computer and let's you skip all those buggy drivers and just use ASIO based drivers for superior sound and integration of future gear.

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