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How can I get Stereo Mix functionality?

Member for

16 years
My new Dell laptop comes with Vista and does not have a "stereo Mix" function, my external Creative Soundblaster MP3+ soundcard also does not have this option, how can I get this stereo mix funtion please,? I would prefer a software option but if not, then hardware, help?

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Member for

14 years 2 months

Space Fri, 02/15/2008 - 16:58
I have yet to locate the words stereo mix function on the website in question.

I have, however, located info that may be of some use?

It reads like you must be logged into your Ustream account BEFORE you begin anything.

http://www.ustream.tv/helpcenter/broadcastvideo#id2
Configuring Sound

3. Select the audio device from the Audio Sources drop down menu. If you have a mic plugged into the input on your computer or laptop then select "Built-in Input". If you want to use the embedded webcam mic then select "Built-in Microphone". If you want to use the audio from a DV camera then you need to connect it to your laptop via a cable connection (i.e. XLR to 1/8" jack or 1/8" jack to 1/8" jack) and then select "Built-in Input".



I'm just here for the beer boss.

Member for

21 years

Member Wed, 02/20/2008 - 14:34
stereo mix

ok i have a similiar problem,

i was told that i can record any sound that is coming out of my computer using sound recorder just like you see in this video : what i am trying to do is take the sound from a video and record it into wav format, from there i know how to do what i want with it

my problem is that when i go in my volume controls i goto options- then properties and when i select recording and i am only able to pick from line in and microphone. now i tried switching my mixer device but i am only able to use sigma tel audio. what i want to know is how can i get the choice of stereo mix..

thankyou everyone and if you dont understand watch the video its exactly what i am trying to do.

Member for

21 years

Member Wed, 02/20/2008 - 15:00
Grove, if you right click in your Sound mixer under the Recording Devices tab, and "Show Disabled Devices" is checked, and you still are unable to see Stereo Mixer, then you are one of the unfortunate customers that bought a computer from a manufacturer (Dell, HP, etc) that has made an agreement with the RIAA to have Stereo Mix disabled due to potential copyright issues that may occur with the feature being enabled. E.g. Recording/Capturing copyrighted material via your sound card using stereo mix.

The only other problem it could be is that you have a very old sound card that did not provide this option to begin with. Most likely, your problem is the OEM agreement with RIAA.

Member for

21 years

Member Wed, 02/20/2008 - 15:30
Unfortunately, no Grove. There's an apparent class action suit regarding this issue against Dell and a proposed one against another manufacturer about this issue -- since Dell conveniently failed to give notice to customers that basic functionalities of their sound cards may be disabled. They didn't own up to it until much much later, and even then it wasn't a complete disclosure of the agreement.

It's an RIAA situation with OEMs. Only a few have gotten aboard about the RIAA agreement but not all.

My suggestion... Don't buy a Dell again. I never will.

Ari

Member for

21 years

Member Wed, 02/20/2008 - 15:38
Grove... sorry, but I said one thing wrong. No, there's nothing you can do about your sound card, BUT to achieve the same effect, yes there is something you can buy.

Essentially you can just run a stereo 1/8" cable from your speaker out port into your line-in port, and then choose line-in port as the source for recording in your recording program.

Most likely if your sound card is multichannel the functionality of that is also disabled, so you may not be able to hear anything when you record something this way.

Member for

14 years 2 months

Space Wed, 02/20/2008 - 16:11
aristjohn wrote: Grove... sorry, but I said one thing wrong. No, there's nothing you can do about your sound card, BUT to achieve the same effect, yes there is something you can buy.

Essentially you can just run a stereo 1/8" cable from your speaker out port into your line-in port, and then choose line-in port as the source for recording in your recording program.

Most likely if your sound card is multichannel the functionality of that is also disabled, so you may not be able to hear anything when you record something this way.

You have lost yer mind boss!!!

You do not run cables out of low quality sound cards and then run the sandwich right back into it. Where the heck are you getting this information? Have you tried it AJ? Try it, you try it and then explain to this guy what happens when you do something so basically dense.

Run a 1/8 inch cable, my butt, where do these ideas come from? Is there a book summers that I missed?

Member for

21 years

Member Wed, 02/20/2008 - 16:18
Actually I do exactly that, and it works just fine for me. I run it straight through my sound system and into my line-in port. Use my software to capture the audio I need for broadcasting.

No problems whatsoever.

But, Grove, with what he said... perhaps you should try that venture at your own risk ::shrug::

Every comp and hardware is different I suppose, but that's how I capture and mix all my audio at CD quality. Like I said, I haven't had any problems with it whatsoever, but you may.

*AJ*

Member for

21 years

Member Sun, 02/17/2008 - 08:20
First of all, I'm new to this forum.
Secondly, I'm glad that I found this forum as I also need some information or sharing of experience in solving problems related to audio, recording, and broadcasting.

Now, about what mikehende has been talking about, the "stereo mix" or "wave out" option:
1. It is true that in order that you can broadcast/webcast your sound file or video file through live streaming, you really need this "stereo mix" or "wave out" option to be enabled or activated on your sound card.
2. Why is it so? I don't know how to explain it from an expert point of view but according to my (and friends') experience, that's the only way to do it.
3. I have several computers with Windows XP on them, some with on-board sound cards, some with plug-in sound cards, and Windows XP can enable this option ("stereo mix" or "wave out") through the Volume Control--Options--Properties--Recording.
Windows Vista, or at least Vista Home Premium installed on certain new laptops (and certain series) such as Sony, Dell, HP/Compaq, does not have an option to change the setting to enable this "stereo mix" or "wave out". Therefore, Mike, and I or others who usually have no problems streaming with Windows XP, now are having this problem with Vista.

If anyone could help Mike, and it means me and some other users too :D , it would be highly appreciated. Perhaps there are some hidden tricks with Vista on how to change the volume control or sound setting?

Thanks so much.

Member for

21 years

Member Wed, 02/20/2008 - 17:17
Well since Dell laptops do not have out ports for the exception of the XPS, he would have to use a stereo system. My assumption was that someone would know their laptop doesn't have an out port. I guess that's my bad. Sorry, Grove for the assumption.

Any type of speaker system will do, you can grab one for $20 at Radio Shack to do what you are wanting which is capture audio. Hook the cable up to the out port and the other into your line-in on your laptop. Set your line-in in the Record control menu, and you're good to go. Remember, you most likely will not hear what you are recording.

Member for

14 years 2 months

Space Wed, 02/20/2008 - 17:35
Ok, we're still on topic, wide and to the outside, but still on it.

If Dell doesn't provide out ports for this particular notebook tell me again what this "sound system" thing is achieving?

One line you say "My assumption was that someone would know their laptop doesn't have an out port" few lines later "Hook the cable up to the out port..."

I'm a non-practicing alcoholic AJ, but I'm thinking about running a few laps here if we cannot get this thing to make sense :)

Member for

17 years 6 months

Cucco Wed, 02/20/2008 - 17:44
Are you suggesting that he take a line out from his stereo into his laptop so he can take sounds from a CD or iPod and put them on his computer?

That's what it sounds like you're saying to me.

Also, I'm not familiar with this class action law suit. Do you have a link to some documentation on this?

Member for

21 years

Member Sun, 02/17/2008 - 12:30
I noticed your discussion on "stereo mixer" problems, perhaps I can help. If you are desiring to ustream then visit the ustream message board or email support@ustream.tv.
Or even better, visit the Ustream Users Community Forum on Tuesdays and Fridays at 7:30 p.m. central for live discussion and help with your problem, it shouldn't be hard to straighten out..

Member for

21 years

Member Wed, 02/20/2008 - 18:17
Ok, well wow... Apparently I'm full of assumptions tonight. When I said:

aristjohn wrote: Any type of speaker system will do, you can grab one for $20 at Radio Shack to do what you are wanting which is capture audio. Hook the cable up to the out port and the other into your line-in on your laptop.

The later sentence followed after the first sentence of using a speaker system, I assumed, he would get that. Perhaps you're just toying with me, who knows. But, whatever :)

Anyways... step by step here:

Get a speaker system. An inexpensive one will do. $20 at Radio Shack

Get a 1/8" speaker cable.

Plug said speaker cable into the outport of SPEAKER SYSTEM.

Plug other end of said speaker cable into the in-line port of LAPTOP.

Go to Recording Menu on Windows ensure it is set to line-in (Grove, probably this is the only thing you ARE seeing since it is a Dell. Dell really screwed their customers with the sound card issue).

Record what you are trying to capture with whatever software. Cakewalk, Audacity, Record Now, CapTalk, doesn't matter... whatever it is. IF it is Audacity it should most likely either be grayed out or defaulted to line-in as the only option available to you. It'll assume the role as a mic, but you are using the out port on the speaker system to help aid in the capture of the audio. So don't worry about it, you won't have to do anything that's just the way Audacity picks it up when you're telling it to record. But, I believe you are saying your going to use Record Now, and that's a very very simple program and you won't have to do anything except check to ensure that Record Menu in Windows is in fact set for line-in which I'm 99.9% with a repetend bar positive that it is.

Now, seriously.. for the exception of pointing out that I assumed that someone (outside of the ones who don't know where the power button is on their computer) would know pretty darn quickly they don't have an out port on a Dell, seriously Space, I didn't think I had made it into this big huge deal and all complicated. ::shrug:: Sorry!

Apologies on any confusion, guys!

Good luck to you, Grove! Hate to see a fellow Dell user (and hopefully former Dell buyer) go through this. This is nasty situation for all Dell, HP, Gateway (?) customers, and a double whammy for musicians and even hardcore online broadcasters who mix.

Member for

14 years 2 months

Space Wed, 02/20/2008 - 18:54
It's convoluted that is why you had to read me the script on it.

It reads like just plugging a 1/8 inch plug into the line in would be enough to set this chain of events into play with no need for the speakers. The speakers don't actually play right?

It's just inside out to me...and I have had my mind around some fairly cosmic scenarios.

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