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Reamping Guitar Tracks

Member for

21 years 2 months
Hey,
I recently did a recording of a local punk band and miced their Mesa Boogie half-stacks, but also took a direct signal from their guitars and recorded thawt straight into the soundcard. Now that I have these tracks that are just guitar ittno direct box, how do I get them back to the amp at a reasonable level? My direct box is really just a "Mic Eliminator" which is active, so I don't think it goes both ways. If I get a normal Direct box that is passive, can I just use this backwards? I know there are a couple of products just for this, are they expensive? Are they really different than any other direct box?

Thanks,
Ian

Comments

Member for

21 years 2 months

Pro Audio Guest Fri, 03/08/2002 - 15:25
I would also be interested in figuring out how the reamp works and how I could make a simplified version that just takes my +4 out to a guitar amp. I know quite a bit of basic electronics, but not enough to just figure it out on my own. So what does the reamp do electronically? Does it just match gain and impedence? Does it use a transformer to do this?

Ian

Member for

19 years 11 months

Ted Nightshade Sat, 03/09/2002 - 07:51
I'm just now realizing that this post started with a punk band playing through mesa boogies! :roll:

But the old punks certainly appreciated fine gear- lots of Les Pauls, Flying V's, and that, mostly through Marshalls.
I always thought a little combo amp would be more "punk" than an arena rig, but I must still be a little unclear on what's punk.
Ted :confused:

Member for

21 years 2 months

Pro Audio Guest Sat, 03/09/2002 - 08:41
Ted,
What a lot of people call "punk" now is very different from the original punk. I don't know how to explain it, but I guess some of the "new punk" bands would be Pennywise, NOFX, The Ataris, Blink 182 (mainstream). Anyway, this "punk" I recorded was by a bunch of sophmores in high school whose parents had bought them some pretty nice stuff. They were actually very good at what they played, which I guess isn't very punk either! I guess the reason why I took a direct out of these guy's amps in the first place was so that I could send their tracks to my Marshall JCM800. I know what a pad does, but can one be made easily?

Ian

Member for

19 years 11 months

Ted Nightshade Sat, 03/09/2002 - 10:29
Actually the old SF punks were very good at what they did, and had rigorous standards for tone and unflagging energetic precise performance. Just their horizons were a bit limited... I think "Communication Breakdown" was the model, and a a certain classic punk guitar solo (the solos were the first to go, then later unrelenting intensity became optional as well) is basically modeled after that one- check out the solo on the Bad Brains' "Sailing On".
I'll post a link to some do it yourself pad instructions. The fanatic thing to do would be to have a switchable set of pads- a stepped attenuator. What might work perfectly well is a continuous passive attenuator with a potentiometer. Not sure how to make one of these, but I have one that comes in handy in a number of situations.
Ted

Member for

21 years 2 months

Pro Audio Guest Sat, 03/09/2002 - 20:41
Originally posted by Bear's Gone Fission:
If there is that little to it, we could naturally try to trick it out with a splitter, say, for parallel processing.

Bear
Bear, why not mult the direct gtr track output to 2 high quality passive DI and variable pad setups if you want to feed two amps? Unless your recorder has a really flimsy output stage it should be able to handle the load. If worst comes to worst you could do two passes with different amp setups. ;) :p :w:

Member for

4 years 9 months

teleharmonic Wed, 12/17/2003 - 08:26
i just built a reamp box a couple months ago. it is possibly the simplest electronics project next to repairing cables. it is basically a transformer hooked up to some variable resistors. well... not 'basically'... it IS a transformer hooked up to a couple of variable resistors.

here's the schematic:
http://www.jensen-transformers.com/as/as092.pdf

it has two dials: one for level matching and one for impedence matching and a ground lift switch. it's a passive device.

i used the jensen tranformer but you could likely swap in a cheaper one if you wanted. project cost me $100 Canadian ($90 of which was the transformer).

just used it last week... works great.

there are a host of schematics on the jensen site:

http://www.jensen-transformers.com/apps_sc.html

greg

Member for

21 years 2 months

Pro Audio Guest Wed, 12/17/2003 - 10:25
Thanks for the responses.

The very same #092-pdf was already on my table, together with I thought #04. In a book about guitar-electronics I've found some interesting impedance characteristics for several pickups,
so by adding say a cap and a coil the resonance of the impedance could be added as well.

Point is, when it works & sounds OK is _IS_ OK, but when I try to understand the function of adding the impedance when sending the signal back to the amp, I can only conclude it wouldn't be necessary.

Because: when DIY-ing the gtr (as when recording it dry to tape/disk) the influence of impedance is already taken into account. Note that I would do it like this: plug gtr into a very Hi-Z DI and feed/copy the direct (pre-DI) dry signal to the amp as well.

This way the DI is already 'sniffing' the interaction between gtr & amp-input. When reamping, all that seems to be needed is taking care the same voltage is present again at the amplifier-input.

Any oversights here ?

Thanks,

Peter

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