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what is Behringer ADA 8200 ? confusing...

Member for

7 years 5 months
Hi,
I'm quite interested about this monster Behringer ADA8200. In fact, I'm quite confusing... It just like an Audio Interface, But yet it mentions AD/DA Converter! So, What is this? And All-In-One gear?

Can someone helps?

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Member for

8 years 7 months

pcrecord Sat, 12/10/2016 - 12:14
mactreouser, post: 445630, member: 47968 wrote: It just like an Audio Interface, But yet it mentions AD/DA Converter! So, What is this? And All-In-One gear?
Simply put, the 8200 is not an audio interface that can work alone with your computer. It uses a connection called ADAT to connect to a interface to expend the input count.

Conclusion, if you have an audio interface that connects to your computer via USB or firewire and also have an adat input. You can add the 8200 to your interface and it wil add 8 preamp/line input.

Member for

7 years 5 months

mactreouser Sat, 12/10/2016 - 23:06
pcrecord, post: 445636, member: 46460 wrote: Simply put, the 8200 is not an audio interface that can work alone with your computer. It uses a connection called ADAT to connect to a interface to expend the input count.

Conclusion, if you have an audio interface that connects to your computer via USB or firewire and also have an adat input. You can add the 8200 to your interface and it wil add 8 preamp/line input.

Thanks for Clarifying that, at least I got the idea "It Isn't an Audio Interface" , haha...

audiokid, post: 445645, member: 1 wrote: Thanks PC. I'm not familiar with this product but I'm assuming its an 8 channel converter / preamp combo.
I've never used ADAT so I don't understand how ADAT channel count interfaces.

As this Behringer ADA8200 is an 8 channel ADA, would you need an 8 channel interface/ADAT?

You questioned my question, actually do I really need one? What I'm considering actually is (you can see some of my threads out there) AD/DA and outboard processing? I"m quite curious about the needs!

Kurt Foster, post: 445646, member: 7836 wrote: it may be used as an expander to an existing converter via lightpipe or stand alone with a PCI card in a tower. i don't think you can interface it stand alone on a laptop.

Thanks for the firmly answer! I got it now!

Member for

8 years 7 months

pcrecord Sun, 12/11/2016 - 06:31
audiokid, post: 445645, member: 1 wrote: I've never used ADAT so I don't understand how ADAT channel count interfaces.
1 adat port can transport 8 channels at 44khz/48khz and 4 channels 88/96khz. On my RME FF800, I use both adat at 96khz which gives me 8 input channels coming from my UA 4-710 that has 4 preamps and transport the signal of 4 ISA preamps as well.

mactreouser, post: 445648, member: 47968 wrote: You questioned my question, actually do I really need one? What I'm considering actually is (you can see some of my threads out there) AD/DA and outboard processing? I"m quite curious about the needs!

Many of RO members do use outboard processing in there work flow. The simplest way to do it is to take the signal of one of your audio interface's output and process it with some outboard gear and then return the signal to an input of the same audio interface. (Beware of feedback risks, the input channel shall never be redirected to the output used for the outboard gear) This method is often called roundtrip.

Thing is, you need a very good reason to use this method because the signal degredation of passing the converters twice may be greater than the goodness you will optain with the outboard gear. For exemple, if I have an LA2A that has a very unique and sweet sound, It might be nice to use it at mix time.
But if I had a choice, I would definitly use in on the way in (while recording) instead of doing the roundtrip.
In case you ask why, here's my opinion ; the ITB tools have been getting so good the last few years that one can mix entirely with the DAW and pluggins. Therefor the risk of signal degradation can be avoided.

So my take on it is that, if you want to use a outboard gear, try to commit and use it while recording instead of after the fact.

BTW, in case we are talking about reamping. buy a reamp box that will change the impedance of the audio interface output to the instrument level of the guitar amp.. This is very important to get good results. .. .

Member for

7 years 5 months

mactreouser Sun, 12/11/2016 - 06:57
pcrecord, post: 445652, member: 46460 wrote: 1 adat port can transport 8 channels at 44khz/48khz and 4 channels 88/96khz. On my RME FF800, I use both adat at 96khz which gives me 8 input channels coming from my UA 4-710 that has 4 preamps and transport the signal of 4 ISA preamps as well.



Many of RO members do use outboard processing in there work flow. The simplest way to do it is to take the signal of one of your audio interface's output and process it with some outboard gear and then return the signal to an input of the same audio interface. (Beware of feedback risks, the input channel shall never be redirected to the output used for the outboard gear) This method is often called roundtrip.

Thing is, you need a very good reason to use this method because the signal degredation of passing the converters twice may be greater than the goodness you will optain with the outboard gear. For exemple, if I have an LA2A that has a very unique and sweet sound, It might be nice to use it at mix time.
But if I had a choice, I would definitly use in on the way in (while recording) instead of doing the roundtrip.
In case you ask why, here's my opinion ; the ITB tools have been getting so good the last few years that one can mix entirely with the DAW and pluggins. Therefor the risk of signal degradation can be avoided.

So my take on it is that, if you want to use a outboard gear, try to commit and use it while recording instead of after the fact.

BTW, in case we are talking about reamping. buy a reamp box that will change the impedance of the audio interface output to the instrument level of the guitar amp.. This is very important to get good results. .. .

Wow... so much appreciate and this is really a great reply with details to me!
So,
1) Nowadays, a lot of plugins doing good job for Mixing, most probably could just stick on DAW Mix instead of roundtrip
2) Even interested to play with the outboard gear, do it in PRE instead of tweak around via roundtrip

Is these what you suggest?

Question (again) - to understand :
If my audio interface only with LR output (like one of mine - Zoom R24), or an USB Mixer (like Behringer UFX1204), how to set the roundtrip ?

Member for

8 years 7 months

pcrecord Sun, 12/11/2016 - 07:42
mactreouser, post: 445653, member: 47968 wrote: 1) Nowadays, a lot of plugins doing good job for Mixing, most probably could just stick on DAW Mix instead of roundtrip
2) Even interested to play with the outboard gear, do it in PRE instead of tweak around via roundtrip

Is these what you suggest?
That's exactly what I suggest. Of course most homestudio don't have the budget to buy 10 outboard compressor at 2000$. It's very good if able to buy 1 or 2.. If you record a drum set with 10 mics it's normal you won't be able to put 10 physical pricy compressor.. but for simple projects, vocal/guit it's easy to make the gear usefull before the signal hit the converter.

mactreouser, post: 445653, member: 47968 wrote: Question (again) - to understand :
If my audio interface only with LR output (like one of mine - Zoom R24), or an USB Mixer (like Behringer UFX1204), how to set the roundtrip ?
It is simple as out to in with anything you want in between. As I said the only important thing is to make sure the signal going in is not going out at the same time.
Many interfaces have a realtime mixer who help monitoring what you record in different outputs.
So if you record a signal coming from the output and that signal also goes to the output, you are doing a loop and there for will create feedback and potentially damage your equipement.

what unit(s) would you like to use OTB ?

Member for

7 years 5 months

mactreouser Sun, 12/11/2016 - 08:13
pcrecord, post: 445656, member: 46460 wrote: That's exactly what I suggest. Of course most homestudio don't have the budget to buy 10 outboard compressor at 2000$. It's very good if able to buy 1 or 2.. If you record a drum set with 10 mics it's normal you won't be able to put 10 physical pricy compressor.. but for simple projects, vocal/guit it's easy to make the gear usefull before the signal hit the converter.

Yup. Think about that too!

pcrecord, post: 445656, member: 46460 wrote:
It is simple as out to in with anything you want in between. As I said the only important thing is to make sure the signal going in is not going out at the same time.
Many interfaces have a realtime mixer who help monitoring what you record in different outputs.
So if you record a signal coming from the output and that signal also goes to the output, you are doing a loop and there for will create feedback and potentially damage your equipement.

what unit(s) would you like to use OTB ?

For a test/experiment task, an old Behringer Dual Compressor is what I have in the store room :p

Could you please show me the route from Audio Interface (which only have 2 outputs like R24, and some Inserts, Aux...like UFX1204) -> Compressor -> DAW (playback and print). Your help is appreciated! :)