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Workstation/Sequencer EQ'ing.

Member for

21 years 2 months
I have been researching recording techniques for the past few weeks and one common thread from the experts seems to always be present, in addition to panning, volumes, etc. To "leave or make room" for vocals by gently adjusting the mid-range frequencies as not to "mud up" the space for a vocal track. In an experiment, I reprogrammed a vocal choir program track ("Just the way you are" Billy Joel) and sure as sh*t, it left a better "pocket" for my vocal track!. My question is, just like an audio engineer will skillfully adjust (if necessary of course) EQ'S on tracks in practice, should I apply THIS SAME practice to different tracks (instruments) in these sequence/compositions for which I am to accompany with live vocals or perhaps to record to disk as a demo? Am I trying to go about this in a rational way? Thanks ----ROB

Comments

Member for

21 years 2 months

Guest Wed, 03/13/2002 - 17:08
You might, but let's face it, it's hard to mix for vocals without the vocals actually being there. In a live situation, it may be easier and more flexible just to use the console EQ going to the PA to scoop out a little midrange if necessary on the prerecorded tracks.

Alternately, you could make two mixes - one with and one without the scoop - and see which sounds better. Ultimately your ears are going to be the judge, and variables such as acoustics of the room you are working in may also affect the decision.

Member for

21 years 2 months

Pro Audio Guest Wed, 03/13/2002 - 17:13
Thanks Littledog. Makes good sense to me. I appreciate you taking the time to respond. ----ROB

Originally posted by littledog:
You might, but let's face it, it's hard to mix for vocals without the vocals actually being there. In a live situation, it may be easier and more flexible just to use the console EQ going to the PA to scoop out a little midrange if necessary on the prerecorded tracks.

Alternately, you could make two mixes - one with and one without the scoop - and see which sounds better. Ultimately your ears are going to be the judge, and variables such as acoustics of the room you are working in may also affect the decision.

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