Advanced Funk Technique

Discussion in 'Guitars' started by ClarkJaman, Jul 2, 2015.

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  1. ClarkJaman

    ClarkJaman Active Member

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    Please forgive me-- this thread has little to do with "recording" and everything to do with musicianship. But I know there are some fantastic guitarists on this site and I thought you might be interested in exploring this song with me. :)

    I'm labouring trying to learn this song on guitar:


    I'm trucking along, but one part I can't figure out for the life of me is the run at 0:25. I know he is doing octaves from C to E chromatically, but I can't figure out why he is strumming like that. He seems to be doing down-up-down-down-up-down-down-up-down-down-up-down and every third stroke (always a down) is a rake. Why wouldn't he just do down-up-down-up-down-up-down-up...? Is it possible that he is actually doing down-up 16th notes and then raking down-up 32nd notes in between and it's just so fast that I can't even tell when I slow it down 75%?

    This song is driving me crazy and I love it!!! :p
     
  2. audiokid

    audiokid Chris Well-Known Member

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    Fun style!

    Curious, is it the sound you are struggling with too?

    But, (except for the traditional palming and/or 1/4/1/8 note down down stuff) fwiw, I strum the same direction as I would if I was soloing. So, at any given moment in a song, I don't get tripped up by going against the natural swing of the rhythm guitars do so well. :D
    The strum hand its the metronome.
    This approach makes it easy to solo or chord "improvise" without loosing a beat.. I took this approach for practicing my chops which seemed to attribute to the ease picking up a song just by listening to it a few times.
    Guitars seems to have a natural up or down motion that we all seem to fall into sooner or later.

    The "down" is the kick and "up" is the open hat/ off beat, back beat. "chuck" (Boom/Chuck)


    I'm curious to hear others on this. I never took a "formal" guitar lesson so I could be talking my own language.
     
  3. DonnyThompson

    DonnyThompson Well-Known Member

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    Well, I don't know if this technique is "formal", as I never took guitar lessons, either, but being primarily a rhythm player, I generally play this way as well ... but it depends on the song, too, I guess. Without having a guitar in my hands it's kind of hard to know exactly what I do and when, because so much of it is a second nature/habit thing... LOL

    It's almost as if he's slipping into a bit of a bass guitar -slap/thump style thing occasionally as well, providing more of the "percussive" vibe..

    Sound wise, it's a classic strat tone.
     
  4. ClarkJaman

    ClarkJaman Active Member

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    I finally figured out the answer to my question. At 0:25 he is doing down-up-down-down-up-down-down-up-down-down-up-down instead of down-up-down-up-down-up-down-up... so that he gets a downstroke for the first stroke of each set of three pulses! :D
     
  5. Chris Perra

    Chris Perra Active Member

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    Sounds like he's keeping the 16ths note pulse going just grouping the pattern in 3. Common for drummers to do R l R R l R etc.
    The rights would be a shuffle pattern. The difference here is that he's using 16ths as the pulse so you get a 3 over 2 thing happening.

    Cool tune very Oz Noyish
     
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  6. audiokid

    audiokid Chris Well-Known Member

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    My thoughts as well.
    The beauty of the guitar, the strum hand is like playing hi-hats.
     
  7. ClarkJaman

    ClarkJaman Active Member

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    Yes, although playing it in 3s, they are still straight sixteenth notes. Playing it in threes instead of alternating down/up gives it a kind of triplet feel although the notes are not triplets.
     

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