Building a new Drum Room

Discussion in 'Acoustics (Live Room, ISO Booths)' started by Jason Morris, Mar 19, 2018.

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  1. Jason Morris

    Jason Morris Active Member

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    Oh! I was expecting to alternate boards of different sizes and slot widths to get more frequencies. Is that not the way to do it?
    I need to look at the book again.
     
  2. kmetal

    kmetal Kyle P. Gushue Distinguished Member

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    You can use different spacing. At the powerstation the board spacing gets smaller as you move higher in the room. This keeps it less reflective at the lower level where the instruments and most mics are, then gets more ambeint as you move higher in the room. It also absorbs deeper bass as you move further away and the bass sound wavelengths increase.

    The reason i would go with 2x10 and 16th inch spacing in your room is to maximize the absorbsion at the problem frequencies around 50-60hz and 100hz. These are the main issues in your room. Also the large boards and small space will increase the amount of highs you reflect back. With reasonators as you absorb lower bass frequencies you reflect more highs. Smaller boards and bigger spaces absorb higher bass frequencies and absorb more highs.

    It could be worth taking some readings at the location of the wiggly wall, and at the various depths to make sure the frequencies coincide.

    As a non-master in acoustics i tend to think about it in a simple way- just absorb as close the fundemental room mode (lowest peak frequency) ie, 50hz, as much as possible. This gets the best bass response and reflects the most highs.

    Your wiggly wall has a continuously varying depth, so your going to have broadband absorption of many frequencies, despite consistent board size and spacing.
     
  3. Jason Morris

    Jason Morris Active Member

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    was that a typo? I was planning on 1x10..?
     
  4. kmetal

    kmetal Kyle P. Gushue Distinguished Member

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    Yes sorry, 1x10. using 2x10 would grab lower frequencies than 1x10 but they would have to be covered or sanded and stained.

    Sorry, it was a typo.
     
  5. Jason Morris

    Jason Morris Active Member

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    well, this is frustrating. I spent several days working on the wiggly wall, putting 1x10's up with 1/16" gaps.
    It looks like it worked at the target frequency of 60hz, but everything else looks significantly worse.

    The green is the measurement taken before I did any wiggly wall nonsense.
     

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  6. kmetal

    kmetal Kyle P. Gushue Distinguished Member

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    I wouldn't panic just yet. Have you changed anything else in the room besides adding slats to the wiggly wall? Are all the other walls uncovered, filled with insulation?

    Have you checked how the drums sound in there yet?

    Remember in a tracking room the drums and the measurement mic, and regular mics arent in fixed locations.

    So it could sound subjectively better as is. Also the room shows improved low end which is better for the entire room as a whole. The mid/highs are directional and more easily influenced by mic location. The bass too will vary with position, but the improvement will be reflected everywhere in the room.

    If you arent happy with the room sound yet, you can always add a theater curtain hanging in front of the resonator. The will absorb the mids and highs while maintaining the smoother low end response, but will cover up your the cool looking wood work.

    You could also wait on the blanket / curtain, until more finish treatment is added. More slats plywood peices ect would scatter more sound around, and could create a more diffuse smoother sound decay. It could make the comb filtering worse too. Sound scattering and diffusion is a difficult area in acoustics and not "figured out" completely yet by anyone. Its not my strongest area of knowledge.

    I would test the drums as is to get an earmark. Then experiment with a blanket(s) in spaced in front of the wiggly wall covering up various portions of the wall. Ie completely covered, half, some sections but not others. Its important to get a feel for the wiggly walls range of sounds it effects.

    Once the wiggly wall was sorta mapped out sonically most important by ear/recording, and measurements perhaps for reference or not, id then mess around with some reflective surfaces around the room. Hopefully you have a sheet or two of plywood and/or some 1xs, to experiment with. You will start to get a feel for where reflecrions sound nasty or good. Id start with reflection materials on the side walls. If looking at the wiggly wall id leave a section of absorption then put the reflective stuff, then some absorbsion section where the drums are. I would try both the reflective surfaces directly across from each other, and staggerred, so they reflect into absorption. You can also experiment with some angles too.

    I wouldnt sweat the graphs too much. The Normandy control room took some time to hone in on the best spots for the plywood reflectors that are hidden behind fabric. Their locations and angles were experimented with.
     
  7. Jason Morris

    Jason Morris Active Member

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    yeah, things seem to sound better than they look.

    here's a quick test I did. Forgive the sloppy playing. I have spent too much time building and not enough time practicing. :D

    No processing of any kind. No mixing really either except panning the overeads and room mics.

     

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  8. kmetal

    kmetal Kyle P. Gushue Distinguished Member

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    Sounding nice in there. Id experiment with a room mic facing the wiggly wall a couple inches away and probably up near a corner. This will show what kind of ambeince is currently available. Not sure if the hall is available for re-amping/ambeince.

    Beyond that is mess with some reflective panels to see if i can get some more top end from the snare without washing out the cymbals.

    Honestly as-is would produce good sounding drum tracks in a mix imho, they sound clear and punchy raw, just a tad dull, and maybe slightly boxy, (which isnt unusual) but still nice and solid. When you factor in processing and sample layering, i dont think the drum sound will have any compromise.

    Nice work man. Looking forward to hearing and seeing more as this evolves and gets wrapped up!
     
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  9. Jason Morris

    Jason Morris Active Member

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    Getting ready to staple cloth to the rest of the walls..
    Any tips for how to keep my bass traps stuffed with fluffy insulation from being lumpy?
    Chicken wire over them before I put the cloth on?
     
  10. kmetal

    kmetal Kyle P. Gushue Distinguished Member

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    You could use chicken wire. They also make a thin metal strapping for retaining insulation which you could use. If theres room you could face the traps which rigid fiberglass too. Small Eye bolts and string or metal string can work too.
     
  11. kmetal

    kmetal Kyle P. Gushue Distinguished Member

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    You have the option of retaining the insulation so it is behind the framings front face a little bit, with an airspace between the fabric. This way is looks good, but you don't have to worry about using a pretty looking or flat or onobtrusive retention method. You can just use watever is easiest and its guarenteed to look good. Since its up high you dont have to be concerned about bumping into it. Although the occasional flying drumstick might hit it lol.
     
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    The New AT5047 Premier Studio Microphone Purity Transformed

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