Building a recording studio

Discussion in 'Mixing & Song Critique' started by MadMax, Dec 29, 2001.

  1. Ted Nightshade

    Ted Nightshade Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2001
    My house studio, in no way suited to commercial recording business, lacks a really good control room. I like the idea of building an outbuilding for a control room, so I could have an old school huge thing 20x30 absolute minimum and high slanted ceilings. It could be an advantage to have it close to but not physically connected to the tracking area (which sounds less crucial in your case), as sound travel would be at a minimum and you can monitor on video if it's impractical just to have windows on both buildings that you can see through into the tracking area. Just an idea.
    I've been loving the quiet out here in my little valley. I've got a ridge in between me and any neighbors. :p If they want to run a backhoe all day I hear only a vague subtle subsonic tone. Gunshots can be a problem but these are infrequent. The single cargo air route over the house is like clockwork. I've never had a problem with it but it would be easy to figure out the schedule and take a five minute break then.
    So I have no soundproofing at all and record with the windows open- birdcalls don't really pickup, oh well! And I have no air conditioning, forced air furnace, refrigerator or anything else to cause rumble issues.
    If your paradise is not this quiet you should look for a huge concrete agricultural building. In my area there are pear cold storage facilities you could park a small airplane in. Very cool! Masonry is the best soundproofing.
    Big houses are very spendy, I bit big outbuildings are not nearly so much. For many buyers they are almost a nuisance.
    I agree that this is trying times for buying gear. A really good room will be useful with whatever they have in 2050. The best investment, although you could probably use a good piano too if you do much classical, choirs and that.
    Maybe you should squirrel away some dough for equipment and forget about it until all the other facilities are in place. If it takes a couple years (reality sometimes! Especially when moving and developing the place at all) the gear scene could be really different. Let everyone else make mistakes in the meantime and learn from that what you really need.
    Ted
     
  2. MadMax

    MadMax Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2001
    Location:
    Sunny & warm NC
    Home Page:
    <SNIP>I like the idea of building an outbuilding for a control room, so I could have an old school huge thing 20x30 absolute minimum and high slanted ceilings. It could be an advantage to have it close to but not physically connected to the tracking area (which sounds less crucial in your case),

    You got it... that's exactly the situation I'd love to get into.

    as sound travel would be at a minimum and you can monitor on video if it's impractical just to have windows on both buildings that you can see through into the tracking area. Just an idea.

    A damn good one if you ask me. My thoughts were also pondering on whether I could possibly set up a VERY basic video system that would allow for webcasting... IF, big IF, I could potentially hook up with a decent video/internet video/audio outfit... (Some pipedream huh?)

    <SNIP>Masonry is the best soundproofing.
    Big houses are very spendy, I bet big outbuildings are not nearly so much. For many buyers they are almost a nuisance.


    The only problem has been in finding that situation without it being thirty miles and fifteen turns off of any major road. I'm not giving up hope. I know that it'll be tough to find, but I expect to persevere.

    I agree that this is trying times for buying gear. A really good room will be useful with whatever they have in 2050. The best investment, although you could probably use a good piano too if you do much classical, choirs and that.

    I've got a line on a 1930's or 40's full size Steinway grand. Low miles and not too bad of shape... still negotiating... if I get it, I'll pay premium dollars I know, but I'd like to get Steinway to move it, set it up, and go through it... Besides, the AWF (Agreeable Wife Factor) indicated that this would be an absolute necessity to actually put a studio on the same property as our home.

    <SNIPPAGE... again> Let everyone else make mistakes in the meantime and learn from that what you really need.
    Ted


    I'm beginning to sense that the overall consensous is to disregard the gear entirely at this stage of the game. But, don't I at least need take into account some sort of dimensional reasoning with the console? With wiring ducts and all, I'd almost think that it would be a necessity...

    Max
     
  3. Ted Nightshade

    Ted Nightshade Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2001
    Good to hear you'll persevere! This may be simplistic, but just leave plenty of space for a huge console if need be.
    If you spend a mint on a fine old Steinway :D

    If you can take a vacation from gear obsession and come back with a fresh perspective when you really have a place to put it all, I truly envy you! You might be smiling pretty big by then.
    :w: Ted
     
  4. Max,

    Sorry it has taken so long to get back with you on this post. It got burried and I didn't check it. Sorry. Anyway..

    Well when you design your room, you need to pick out a pro with the track record to do it. Genelec, specializes in sound reproduction, this is what they do. Their high end solutions start at around 30k and got to about $50k. Genelec is in the business to provide professional solutions, and they don't stay in business by "passing the buck" and sticking you with a room that you have 30-50k in just speakers. This is something that is taken and planned from conception. The price of their expertise is already figured in. If the room isn't right on the big systems the frequency response is all wrong, thus making the sound reinforcement system inaccurate. Genelec doesn't want this anymore than you.

    I deal with companies that stand behind their product and service as I do. I am presently working on business relationships with Genelec and Studio Acousticians, that compliment each other so the above scenario doesn't occure. I talked to Genelec to see who they recomend, and who does quality work. I am presently putting together a team that could meet your needs in an effecient manner.

    It is a big job putting together a commercial recording solution. You need help you can rely on.

    Max if you want we can get together with some studios that Genelec has installed some wall mount speakers, and you can talk to the studio owners, look at them, and listen. There are no surprises and secrets in this part of the business. We'll go to several places that you can see first hand. You have to be comfortable with who you work with. If you are interested I'll set it up. That way you'll know. No commitment needed. I feel confident that if you are in the market for the Wall system, Genelec is the only way to go.

    Have you decided on your total budget?

    Thanks

    Darren
    http://www.dixondigital.com
     
  5. MadMax

    MadMax Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2001
    Location:
    Sunny & warm NC
    Home Page:
    Well, I FINALLY get to post an update on things...

    Here's the poop so far; Found 5.6 Acres with a nice house with a basement AND.... (drum roll please......)

    A 30x40 unfinished barn with 20+ foot clear-span ceiling height!!!

    It's on a concrete footer with cinderblock foundation that is 3 courses above ground. The walls are 20' high on top of the block. The walls are 2x8 unfinished on the inside. The exterior is 3/4" CDX (painted). The roof is 4-12 pitch with 3/4" plywood, tar paper and asphalt shingle.

    The unfinished floor is about 3" of large gravel and "crush and run" packed solid. Should make the concrete pouring a bit more stable than just pouring it on top of undisturbed soil and an inch or two of gravel.

    We're hoping to close by the end of June with construction to begin ASAP.

    Jumping the gun a bit... I found a hell of a buy on 728 sq ft of 3/4" Cherry tongue and groove. The wood will be going into storage for a couple of months whilst everything else gets underway.

    Anyone have any recommendations on a preferred type of wood for finished flooring? I was thinking about hard rock maple or ash. I can get red or white oak very reasonably priced and almost always available.

    Thanx for any input.

    xaMdaM
     

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