DIY lettering

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair Modifications DIY' started by mberry593, Apr 13, 2012.

  1. mberry593

    mberry593 Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2012
    Location:
    Silver Spring, Maryland
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    Sometimes I build my own stuff. I have been using dry transfer lettering called "Letraset" to label the controls and connectors. I purchased it many years ago at a hobby shop. I can no longer find it in the style that I need. Everything I found was either too large or the wrong color. I prefer white labels. I searched and found some Chartpak lettering but it also was too large. I also found a system to make letters on a laser printer but that cost waaaay too much. I would prefer not to use p-touch labels because I don't want to see the backing.

    So what I am asking is how do you DIY people label things these days? Any information would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks
     
  2. MrEase

    MrEase Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2006
    Location:
    West Suss ex, UK
    Like you I have always used Letraset for prototyping. It seems it is still available with font size of 3mm (1/8th") or is that still too large for you?

    Letraset - Helvetica Med Cond
     
  3. mberry593

    mberry593 Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2012
    Location:
    Silver Spring, Maryland
    Home Page:
    Thanks for the reply. Unfortunately at that site (and others) the 3mm white is out of stock.
     
  4. MrEase

    MrEase Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2006
    Location:
    West Suss ex, UK
    The site I pointed to is the manufacturers own site. I can only suggest you try contacting them to see when they'll have some more in stock.
     
  5. dvdhawk

    dvdhawk Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2008
    Location:
    Western Pennsylvania, USA
    I've seen Chartpak lettering 3mm and smaller: PCB

    I wonder how small the machines they use in the sign / vinyl lettering business can cut. I know a couple people in the sign business, they can do 1/4" pretty easily, but 3mm might be too fine to get a clean cut. It might be ridiculously expensive too, I don't know. Since they wouldn't have to fuss with putting it on, they might help a guy out if they had the time. It would certainly be a good adhesive (maybe too good).

    There are numerous places who will silk-screen or laser etch metal work, but I'm sure that's too expensive for prototyping.
     
  6. RemyRAD

    RemyRAD Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2005
    Mike, why do you think all of the other manufacturers utilize silkscreening? Because it is practical and designed to do exactly what you want. It's slightly complicated, a little involved and of course somewhat messy. But it looks slick with silk. I certainly haven't bothered with that and use a P Touch labeler and live with it. It's adequate to quote a friend of mine.

    The practical if not adequate
    Mx. Remy Ann David
     

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