Drum Mic opinions

Discussion in 'Drums' started by Randy Carrillo, Nov 4, 2014.

  1. Davedog

    Davedog Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2001
    Location:
    Pacific NW
    I'm not sure that drum sound isn't samples. There may be a live mic'd drum in their somewhere but it sounds like samples over the top. Nothing wrong with that. I use it all the time.
     
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  2. MadMax

    MadMax Well-Known Member

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    Mar 18, 2001
    Location:
    Sunny & warm NC
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    Go to:
    1) Goodwill/local thrift shop with furniture... Look for a pillow that is ~18" x anything less than 18".
    2) Go to any large chain/big box store and get the cheapest down/feather pillow you can that's as close to 18" as you can find.
    3) Get a piece of velour fabric 1 yard long... fold ROUGHLY in half (~18") and fold in to fit and covers the bottom 2 lugs, to no more than the bottom 4 lugs.

    The key is to get the damping material JUST to touch both heads.
    (Most throw pillows have a roll/bead of fabric around the center that will lightly wedge in just fine.)

    Tune that puppy as follows...
    Batter head: tune to first resonant point... leave it that loose for now.
    Reso head: Tune to first octave of the batter head.
    Throw in the damping
    Start tightening the batter head no more than 1/4 turn... you'll hear it all of a sudden just become a cannon.

    After that, it doesn't matter which mic you use... You'll get a good kick sound, but only if it sounds good to begin with.
     
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  3. Kurt Foster

    Kurt Foster Distinguished Member

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    Jul 2, 2002
    Location:
    77 Sunset Lane.
    i like "Dead Ringers" to dampen kicks. why? because they leave the rest of the drum shell undamped .... make a kick drums sound good imo.
     
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  4. audiokid

    audiokid Chris Staff

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    One of my best friends is a drummer who does it that way. I thought it was a disco thing lol. I like it more than ever now because it kills that boing! which helps get a nice fat sub.
     
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  5. MadMax

    MadMax Well-Known Member

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    I can work with Dead Ringers... but I prefer the emad
     
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  6. Randy Carrillo

    Randy Carrillo Active Member

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    Jun 9, 2014
    Great! I will be going with the e602 then!
     
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  7. Davedog

    Davedog Distinguished Member

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    Dec 10, 2001
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    Pacific NW
    Emad here.
     
  8. Matt

    Matt Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2014
    Location:
    Canada
    Hey,
    I am a drummer and have been through my fair share of mice. I've used the d112, the md421 and so on. I had a shure beta 91 for a while but recently I acquired the beyerdynamic drum mic kit. I am really surprised that we don't hear about this more. I thought the beta91 sounded good but the beyerdynamic tg d70d blew it out of the water. I lot more bottom and and less clicking highs without sounding fat. Great for live music. I am truly impressed with the tg mic kit including the tgd58c, d57c and the mc930/950 overheads and hi-hat mics and I am really surprised they are not more common. The Tom mic have the best clips I have ever used on a Tom and fit even if you have suspension on your toms which is great because even an industry standard sennheiser e604 clip does not work with suspension on toms. It's my 2 cents. They are pricy but what a difference it makes. I recently bought a ride nt1000 and was surprised how little of a difference it made over some other condenser mics as I was expecting a big difference as I hear with the beyers. Definitely not disappointing.
     
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  9. Matt

    Matt Active Member

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    Oct 28, 2014
    Location:
    Canada
    As for that drum sound you like, I can maybe point you in the right directio as I have spent countless hours tunning and eq'ing my drums while recording. The first key is obviously having good sounding drums and great tunning. It's unbeleivable how many drummers can't tune their kits. As for the recording, that sound really does emphasize the attack of the stick which is usually around or just below 4k. With a narrow bandwidth on your eq, crank up the gain and try to zero in the attack around 3-4khz. Once you find the clicking, spread the bandwidth a bit a low the gain to a desirable amount, I usually find myself around 3-6db up. The mids seem to be cut quite a bit which will help against resonance and it will give more space for other things to come through in the mix. Experiment with that and good luck. Don't hesitate to contact me if you have questions
     
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  10. Big_D

    Big_D Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2004
    Location:
    Quakertown PA
    As a drummer I probably have way more opinions on this topic than most would like to hear but here's a few anyway.

    D112 - I like it most on small (20" or >) kicks with a more resonant front head. It gets a lot of use on my '72 Ludwigs

    Beta 52 - Best used on larger kicks (22" and up) with a more muted front head. Used mostly on my Ludwig Super Classics and Tama Starclassics

    D6 - Best on larger kicks - I don't use this in the studio much except for a clicky metal sound. Used mostly for live work.

    RE20 - good on everything but more work to EQ - was stolen quite a few years ago but was my go to when nothing else worked.

    I sometimes add a 4047 or 4033 in front of the kick to pick up more of the low end but in general I keep the drum micing simple as I prefer more traditional sounds to todays processed sounds.
     
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  11. Randy Carrillo

    Randy Carrillo Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2014
    I currently have the e602 for the kick. An SM57 and an i5 for the snare. Use either mic depending on the genre. MD421s for the rack tom and floor tom. And two AT2020s for OHs. I am pretty satisfied with my set up. The one I would maybe change later on are the OHs. The AT2020s do the job with some added eq. But I am sure there are better mics that can be used for OHs.
    Tuning the drums is of course the first thing I did before even thinking of what mics to purchase. I spent a lot of money on trying to find the right drum heads to suit the sound I was looking for. I am glad I did this as it makes recording the set easier.
    As I said I am pretty happy with my set up right now. Now I just need to work on recording the drums and messing around with everything that can be done to the tracks so I can gain experience and learn more through this.
     
  12. paulears

    paulears Well-Known Member

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    I have a 112, and use it on the kick for our Beachboy Tribute. It sounds right for this. On the other hand with a rock kit, it just doesn't do the business at all, without far too savage eq. The Beta52 seems to work well on thumpier rock for me. I do rather like the 112 on a double bass, though.
     
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  13. Boswell

    Boswell Moderator Distinguished Member

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    I've been round the houses several times with kick mics, and for live work I now just put up an RE20 outside and sometimes a Beyer M88 inside and use those unless the actual drum sounds really bad acoustically. In that case I'll try other dynamic mics until I find an acceptable sound, but there generally isn't a huge amount of time available for experiment when you are setting up for live recording.

    In the studio, I normally ask the drummer how he wants his kick to sound, and then put up several mics on the kick at the same time, always including an RE20. The drummer is impressed by what comes out of the array of mics, and I never tell him it's just the RE20 in the mix.
     
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  14. DonnyThompson

    DonnyThompson Distinguished Member

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    The RE20 is absolutely my go-to mic for kick drum. (pretty nice for vocals, sax, trumpet and trombone too!)

    FWIW, the D112 would almost always be my last choice.
     
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  15. Kurt Foster

    Kurt Foster Distinguished Member

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    Jul 2, 2002
    Location:
    77 Sunset Lane.
    nothing wrong with a D112 if you know how to use it that is ...... :rolleyes:
     
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  16. DonnyThompson

    DonnyThompson Distinguished Member

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    I guess I just don't have the level of experience commensurate to what is required in its use. ;)
     
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  17. Big_D

    Big_D Well-Known Member

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    Aug 21, 2004
    Location:
    Quakertown PA
    I love the D112 depending on the source and style. I've had great success with it on country and blues or really any style of music where most of the bass guitar notes are on the E & A strings because it lets the kick sit just perfectly above that. It seems to favor smaller, slightly higher pitched kicks in my experience too. It's not my choice for heavier styles of music or really dense mixes as it seems to get lost but in its element I think it's great!
     
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  18. Kurt Foster

    Kurt Foster Distinguished Member

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    Jul 2, 2002
    Location:
    77 Sunset Lane.
    with the d112 it all depends on where it's placed and what it's aimed at .... never had one fail to do the job. of course nothings perfect but to me the d112x is a standard. just like an re20, a 57 or a 421. d112 is also a good guitar amp mic.
     
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  19. simman

    simman Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2012
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Here's one no one mentioned but Telefunken M82 on kick and if you want a great mic for snare put away the 57 and get a Telefunken M80 you won't regret the purchase.
     
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  20. DonnyThompson

    DonnyThompson Distinguished Member

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    There's nothing wrong with using a 57 on a snare, thousands of hits have been recorded using it. Then again I wouldn't think that there'd be anything wrong using an M80 series either, considering Telefunken's track record with mics.

    At brass tacks, everything is going to rely on the mic preamp you choose... even more-so than the mic.

    The 57 is much cheaper, though... by around $300.
     
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